Maize Guide 2021 Available Now from Wynnstay

Wynnstay

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The latest maize guide is available now to download from wynnstay.co.uk.

Introduction to Maize 2021 by Dr Simon Pope, Crop Protection Manager, Wynnstay Group PLC

The UK maize area continues to increase and for 2020 it was estimated to be more than 200,000 ha. Cropping has increased across all maize-growing regions throughout the country, and the South West and West Midlands regions now account for more than half of the total area. Livestock producers appreciate the value of high dry matter yields of high feed-value forage.

The crop is an important feedstock in biogas production and the benefits of including maize as a break in arable rotations are widely recognised, particularly as blackgrass control becomes an increasing problem.

To achieve the best results it is important to plan ahead and attention to detail at every step of the way pays dividends.

With the value of varieties such as Prospect topping £10,000/ha (covered later in the guide), it is worth giving careful consideration to agronomy, inputs, harvesting and ensiling.

To achieve the best results it is important to plan ahead and attention to detail at every step of the way pays dividends.

A good crop of maize is a cheap crop, whilst a poor crop of maize is very expensive indeed.
With the value of varieties such as Prospect topping £10,000/ha (covered later in the guide), it is worth giving careful consideration to agronomy, inputs, harvesting and ensiling.

Request a hard copy or digital version at https://www.wynnstay.co.uk/maize-guide
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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