Mastering spring barley – Malting market looks buoyant

Written by cpm from CPM Magazine

Download PDF The spring barley area is expected to be at its lowest level for two years after a kinder autumn enabled autumn drilling, but it’s a crop with multiple market options that can be grown with low nitrogen inputs. CPM delves into the opportunities it presents growers. Malting barley has its own momentum and with premiums it stands on its own feet. By Melanie Jenkins UK spring barley has multiple market outlets and there are options to grow dual purpose varieties to provide flexibility if the growing season means things don’t go to plan. The most prominent market is now for distilling, which non-glycosidic nitrile (GN) spring barley is grown for, explains Jonathan Arnold, of Robin Appel. Over half of all malting barley grown in the UK goes for malt distilling, adds Tracy Creasy of Syngenta. “Traditionally this was all taken from barley drilled in Scotland and the North of England but nowadays the market is so large that distilling varieties are grown across the whole of the UK.” Almost all Scottish spring barley is grown for malt distilling and some low nitrogen crops grown in England which make the grade will provide malt for the Scottish distilling industry…
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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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