Might as well pack up

Barleymow

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Ipswich
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Gong Farmer

Member
BASIS
Location
Glos
What I don't get about these sky high grain prices, is surely someone down the chain is going to refuse to pay the increased costs? Even if it went right through to retail bread, at £10 a loaf not much would sell.
 
Either price of the finished product at your farm gate pencils (as the Americans like to say) or you don't produce it. It is that simple. The cost of fertiliser when lumping on to the average shopping bill will be pennies added to the total.

The price of the stuff at the farm gate will have to increase or no one will use fertiliser and supply will drop back. All you guys will do is pass on the cost to the buyers. It's not like any farmer will be able to totally negate the cost increases so for once you will be in the same basket as each other.
 

Pennine Ploughing

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North Cumbria
Could be a good thing really, I mean farmers feel under valued and are all running to stand still, your all on the treadmill doing same old stuff for little return long term.
A shortage of food globally could help long term, as unrest in the public of the country could well cause trouble for the government, this may see a change of opinion by the leaders, and thus a change of policy on agriculture and environmental schemes.
So hold on in there for the rocky ride ahead, but might do as much good for food production in UK as it did after ww2.
 
What I don't get about these sky high grain prices, is surely someone down the chain is going to refuse to pay the increased costs? Even if it went right through to retail bread, at £10 a loaf not much would sell.

Rubbish, people need to eat. Food would be the very last thing I would decline to buy. Once you can't afford food you're down to donations and probably stealing the stuff.

Agriculture will come out as the winner of all this, in any worldwide shock to the supply chain, it always does. Many people will undoubtedly reduce output, cull or sell cows or get by with less fertiliser, others will take out a functional calculator and work out how much the added cost will incur and decide whether it will be realistic to go ahead or not. If some people want to hang up their boots I'd understand but many have been through worse times than this. Wheat at £60 sounds way scarier to me.
 
I can see a lot of dairy cows hanging on a hook

Not all about arable doncha know
Go and visit an organic dairy farm and learn how they do it with slurry muck and legumes
It can be done

at 1300 I will halve the rate or more and take a lower yield
Needing less combine dryer loading and labour
1300 a tonne or £4 a kg of n needs wheat at 500 a tonne to maintain the rate
 
I would imagine the overseas contributors, many of whom face this same quandary every year will not be very sympathetic on this thread. Many of them have to have a few brave pills on board and a good calculator before making decisions, especially when many of them have extremes of weather to contend with and might not actually harvest a crop with 100% reliability some years.
 
Biggest problem is going to be the price of feed for intensive livestock/poultry units imo, most of them will not fatten/milk or breed without it. Corn price will offset fert ,fuel etc for the arable farmers. I expect big rises in the price of meat and milk or there will not be any

How much will the fertiliser price add to the cost of a steak or a loaf of bread? When all value is added and all processing complete, the end price on the shelf bears no relation to the real world price at the farm gate?

Diesel at £2 a litre and food price increases, maybe I won't get a new car on finance every 3 years or get some daft new phone that costs £60 a month to impress the friends I don't actually have?
 

Humble Village Farmer

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Cb97ej
What I don't get about these sky high grain prices, is surely someone down the chain is going to refuse to pay the increased costs? Even if it went right through to retail bread, at £10 a loaf not much would sell.
Wheat at £300 per tonne is 30p a kilo.

A loaf of bread uses approx 500g of flour. 15p for that wheat.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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