Milk Price Tracker

pastit

Member
It's not quite as simple as that. It can be described generally:
On a constituents basis an ex farm price for a standard litre of milk in the supermarket own brands is around 25ppl currently. It will have varied from 16ppl to 30ppl in recent years.
However the own brand milk in most is tied to specific producers and they receive a set price for it.

As for profits, Farms can vary wildly, processors generally work on tiny margins and supermarkets post profits in the billions.

There are also products available from producer cooperatives where indeed any profit generated finds it way back to the farm however.
25 pp pint not litre.
 

dinderleat

Member
Location
Wells
It's not quite as simple as that. It can be described generally:
On a constituents basis an ex farm price for a standard litre of milk in the supermarket own brands is around 25ppl currently. It will have varied from 16ppl to 30ppl in recent years.
However the own brand milk in most is tied to specific producers and they receive a set price for it.

As for profits, Farms can vary wildly, processors generally work on tiny margins and supermarkets post profits in the billions.

There are also products available from producer cooperatives where indeed any profit generated finds it way back to the farm however.
Also with his level of constituents it would produce a lot more cream and skim milk powder per litre of milk than say a standard litre of milk 4% fat 3.3% pro which currently equates to 10p a litre more value of final product. I may have confused myself there??
 
Location
southwest
It's not quite as simple as that. It can be described generally:
On a constituents basis an ex farm price for a standard litre of milk in the supermarket own brands is around 25ppl currently. It will have varied from 16ppl to 30ppl in recent years.
However the own brand milk in most is tied to specific producers and they receive a set price for it.

As for profits, Farms can vary wildly, processors generally work on tiny margins and supermarkets post profits in the billions.

There are also products available from producer cooperatives where indeed any profit generated finds it way back to the farm however.

Yeah, no money in milk for processors. That's why Herr Muller has paid the best part of £200 million to get a share of the action.
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
Yeah, no money in milk for processors. That's why Herr Muller has paid the best part of £200 million to get a share of the action.
On the other hand over here Westland dairy has just been sold to the Chinese (who just want the product) because they were struggling to make money and Fonterra's going slowly broke, with big losses and more people about to lose their jobs.
So maybe not plain sailing?
 
On the other hand over here Westland dairy has just been sold to the Chinese (who just want the product) because they were struggling to make money and Fonterra's going slowly broke, with big losses and more people about to lose their jobs.
So maybe not plain sailing?
Dad said that the exporter stated that debt has reached 25$ a K.G. of solids in NZ. If correct that is serious money.
 
So if the exchange rate is 5 to 1
Then that works out in uk terms £5 per kg of solids.
So for us that would be £2600 a cow. Or 700k. Which would equate to 30% of our asset base. Which looks fine on paper but the ability to service and then repay that debt on a lower long term price than we have is quite scary.
Even in my younger days debt like that would have kept me awake at night.
Hoping to be under £600 a cow by Christmas that’s manageable for me.
 
So if the exchange rate is 5 to 1
Then that works out in uk terms £5 per kg of solids.
So for us that would be £2600 a cow. Or 700k. Which would equate to 30% of our asset base. Which looks fine on paper but the ability to service and then repay that debt on a lower long term price than we have is quite scary.
Even in my younger days debt like that would have kept me awake at night.
Hoping to be under £600 a cow by Christmas that’s manageable for me.
But the exchange rate is 2:1 not 5:1. So that works out as £12.50/ kg MS, which would be £2.5m for me. A big number but quite servicable at current prices. Interest and capital on that would be less than my rent bill.

Average debt in NZ has increased 400% in the last 10 years.
 
But the exchange rate is 2:1 not 5:1. So that works out as £12.50/ kg MS, which would be £2.5m for me. A big number but quite servicable at current prices. Interest and capital on that would be less than my rent bill.

Average debt in NZ has increased 400% in the last 10 years.
Your right sorry. So over 6k per cow for me. I suppose I’m used to paying back debt either out of cash flow or at max 5 to 10 yr time frames the monies involved here would not allow that.
No thank you!
 
Last edited:

Rossymons

Member
Location
Cornwall
So if the exchange rate is 5 to 1
Then that works out in uk terms £5 per kg of solids.
So for us that would be £2600 a cow. Or 700k. Which would equate to 30% of our asset base. Which looks fine on paper but the ability to service and then repay that debt on a lower long term price than we have is quite scary.
Even in my younger days debt like that would have kept me awake at night.
Hoping to be under £600 a cow by Christmas that’s manageable for me.
Now all we have to do is figure out many cows you're milking! :pompous::pompous::pompous:
 

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Creamy, untreated and in a glass bottle: Britain gets a taste for old-fashioned milk

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Creamy, untreated and in a glass bottle: Britain gets a taste for old-fashioned milk

Written by Freya Herring

Dairy farmers cash in on a growing trend to replace both homogenisation and plastic with a revival of the traditional ways
“When the milk price crashed five years ago, we were in a bad...
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