Milk Price Tracker

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
Do you mind me asking where the bacto problem was? I’ve got a niggly issue, I cannot get it below 40 and everything has been cleaned inspected, tried different tanks etc. Had milk tested which pointed to tank, scrubbed both tanks etc to no avail.
in the milk line, 12 units/side, the surge was not quite touching the top of the pipe, in one place, in the middle, about 6ins. That line had been swapped rewashed time and time again, and the experts kept saying, no problem there, it was the tank, the water, the cows and every other thing, but not the milk line. We only found it, because we started stripping the whole parlour out, and lucky to spot it then, taking the pipes outside, just saw a thin film, in the sunlight, impossible to see without sun, or torch, sorted, bacto straight back down. As 24/24, we now have a surge on both sides ! After paying 2.5 thousand, to one '''expert''' firm, the best we got was, 'mmmm intriguing', and they never rung back, to see if problem had been sorted, we simply stopped using them. A very costly experience, under wyke, we wouldn't have been penalised.
 

Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton
That losses in one yer can be offset against another year's profit.

Are any other businesses allowed to do this?

So the fact beef and sheep , and some milk producers have been paid below the cost of production for x number of years the fact averaging their income tax, which maybe some weren't paying any makes it all right.

Makes complete sense not
 
Location
southwest
The issue with farming is that the losses from previous years business activities is never recouped in any sector

You posted the above. I pointed out that farming enterprises are allowed to average out their losses and profits over a number of years.

At the end of the day, it's up to individual farmers if they continue to run a loss making business. Perhaps these individuals are not good businessmen as rising land prices, rising breeding stock prices, the fact that UK farmers spend more on machinery than anyone else, the dearth of farms available to rent and the fact that hardly anyone seems willing to take advantage of the "early retirement" scheme proposed last year, suggests that not all farmers are worried about being "paid below the cost of production for x number of years"
 

Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton
You posted the above. I pointed out that farming enterprises are allowed to average out their losses and profits over a number of years.

At the end of the day, it's up to individual farmers if they continue to run a loss making business. Perhaps these individuals are not good businessmen as rising land prices, rising breeding stock prices, the fact that UK farmers spend more on machinery than anyone else, the dearth of farms available to rent and the fact that hardly anyone seems willing to take advantage of the "early retirement" scheme proposed last year, suggests that not all farmers are worried about being "paid below the cost of production for x number of years"


So when First milk, meadow, Omsco, any other buyer went through a rough patch they over paid their producers to make up the difference?or do you have to recoup via the standard price?
 

farmeronecow

Member
Location
Dorset
in the milk line, 12 units/side, the surge was not quite touching the top of the pipe, in one place, in the middle, about 6ins. That line had been swapped rewashed time and time again, and the experts kept saying, no problem there, it was the tank, the water, the cows and every other thing, but not the milk line. We only found it, because we started stripping the whole parlour out, and lucky to spot it then, taking the pipes outside, just saw a thin film, in the sunlight, impossible to see without sun, or torch, sorted, bacto straight back down. As 24/24, we now have a surge on both sides ! After paying 2.5 thousand, to one '''expert''' firm, the best we got was, 'mmmm intriguing', and they never rung back, to see if problem had been sorted, we simply stopped using them. A very costly experience, under wyke, we wouldn't have been penalised.
Definitely worth a check, looks clean from the end but i do have a bit of a suspicion that the surge might not be 100%, parlour engineer tells me it’s fine and it will be in the tank. Dairy engineer tells me tanks are fine and it will be the plant!
 

Ball acre

Member
Location
Somerset
Definitely worth a check, looks clean from the end but i do have a bit of a suspicion that the surge might not be 100%, parlour engineer tells me it’s fine and it will be in the tank. Dairy engineer tells me tanks are fine and it will be the plant!
Can't you just take two samples one morning. One from the last bit of milk out of the pipe before it hits the tank. The second from the tank. This will tell you where the problem lies. Work forwards or backwards from there.
 

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
Definitely worth a check, looks clean from the end but i do have a bit of a suspicion that the surge might not be 100%, parlour engineer tells me it’s fine and it will be in the tank. Dairy engineer tells me tanks are fine and it will be the plant!
at one stage, adamant it was our borehole water, today, as it was then, our water check for RT, came back perfect.
Stupidest idea, it was our volume washer, must have picked up 'something', really clutching at straws, with that one.
 

Ball acre

Member
Location
Somerset
at one stage, adamant it was our borehole water, today, as it was then, our water check for RT, came back perfect.
Stupidest idea, it was our volume washer, must have picked up 'something', really clutching at straws, with that one.
Surely you just test different parts in isolation until you find the culprit. Did any of your experts use a borescope?
 

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
Surely you just test different parts in isolation until you find the culprit. Did any of your experts use a borescope?
yes, that's why they were certain it wasn't the milk line.
if a problem arises, it's usually tank, air line/split liner, or milk line, that is where to go first, and usually is one of them. After that, it gets more complicated, and then it's a hunt, but that milk line, had been swabbed, at every unit joint, by more than one company, went down each pipe, with it, and still missed it. One of the problems was the bacto was never to 'bad', just over the penalty point, a high one, is easier to find. Drove us mad, and all the 'extras' we were told to try, put on 1 hour each milking, fine, if it made a difference, but didn't. When you have exhausted all your own ideas, and all the 'experts' ideas, and not cured it, we even contemplated selling the cows, that penalty hurt.
 

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