milk vending machine

delilah

Member
FFS.
Someone wants to buy a vending machine, let them buy a vending machine. Someone wants to sell it from a jug, let them sell it from a jug.
All the many many enemies of the industry, all the many many benefits of selling direct, and all folks can do is pick a fight with a firm offering one way to sell direct.
 

Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton
FFS.
Someone wants to buy a vending machine, let them buy a vending machine. Someone wants to sell it from a jug, let them sell it from a jug.
All the many many enemies of the industry, all the many many benefits of selling direct, and all folks can do is pick a fight with a firm offering one way to sell direct.
The firm has made claims on carbon footprint.
Very much a hot topic I want more clarity on the claims.
 

Tim G

Member
You don't need a vending machine to sell glass bottles, nor are glass bottles the complete answer.
I don't know who's post that is but it's going some to sell 9500 litres of milk a week. In our experience, very few bottles come back for a refill which makes them worse than plastic for the environment.
 

Tim G

Member
The issue is that its a ridiculous situation when people want glass because they've seen an image of a seal stuck in a carrier bag or something on the TV last night and were then told reusable glass is so much better. They then return but they've forgot the bottle/put it out for recycling/flowers look nice in it/ filled it with something else/can't be ar$ed to rinse it out and return it. The hypocrisy of it winds me up. And don't even get me started on the state of some bottles people return.....
🤮🤮
 

thewalrus

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Northern Ireland
You don't need a vending machine to sell glass bottles, nor are glass bottles the complete answer.
I don't know who's post that is but it's going some to sell 9500 litres of milk a week. In our experience, very few bottles come back for a refill which makes them worse than plastic for the environment.
selling glass bottles is another money making side of it. The glass bottles are branded too, makes it part of the thing buy the glass and the milk. Take a picture stick it on Instagram-why not make as much out of it as you can
 
The issue is that its a ridiculous situation when people want glass because they've seen an image of a seal stuck in a carrier bag or something on the TV last night and were then told reusable glass is so much better. They then return but they've forgot the bottle/put it out for recycling/flowers look nice in it/ filled it with something else/can't be ar$ed to rinse it out and return it. The hypocrisy of it winds me up. And don't even get me started on the state of some bottles people return.....
🤮🤮
Which is why if you sell them before the milk is purchased people generally bring them but plus when it’s through the vender they will clean them properly for themselves rather the bring a stinky bottle back for someone else to wash
 

Daniel

Member
Meanwhile, we went for the traditional pintie.
View attachment 953189
We don't sell the bottle, it's included in the price of the milk and a crate is left out for returns. Over the last 12 moths we have averaged 18 trips per bottle. I am well chuffed with that and it says something about our customers too 😊
We do the same with egg trays and boxes, we ask for them to be returned, but offer no rebate for returning them, what with it being an unattended egg stall, but we do get quite a lot back. We also get supermarket egg boxes left for us, which are useless to us, but the thought is nice!
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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