molases on cereals

I have hear of research in the USA spraying sugar on to raise brix levels in corn to get them to a point where they convert atmospheric N into usable N...considered to be the holy grail...but like may technologies that would kill corporations..it goes missing...

And i would probably assume that people who do see a bump in crop performance, that is achieved by some sort of improvement in leaf efficiency...converting the light or atmospheric N into Grain size etc...(leaf applied of course not soil applied)

It's certainly an area worth playing with...i will mess with from next year onwards as will have molasses for calves so a bit will go missing!

Ant...
 

shakerator

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
LINCS
Arbitrage.

Buy wheat sell sugar!

Taking advantage of price differential in 2 different markets to make risk less profit. Perhaps easier to do from a trading desk than a crop sprayer. How does it make sense to use a refined foodstuff to produce more of an unrefined commodity?!
has anyone tried to use 1 kg/ha of plain sugar with foliar spraxs, might be even easier to dilute & less messy than molasses.
York-Th.
 
I have hear of research in the USA spraying sugar on to raise brix levels in corn to get them to a point where they convert atmospheric N into usable N...considered to be the holy grail...but like may technologies that would kill corporations..it goes missing...

And i would probably assume that people who do see a bump in crop performance, that is achieved by some sort of improvement in leaf efficiency...converting the light or atmospheric N into Grain size etc...(leaf applied of course not soil applied)

It's certainly an area worth playing with...i will mess with from next year onwards as will have molasses for calves so a bit will go missing!

Ant...
hey Ant, do you have any links to that research ?

I would certainly be interested in your results

( & thanks for pointing me to this forum via another one (y) )
 
Last edited:
hey Ant, do you have any links to that research ?

I would certainly be interested in your results

( & thanks for pointing me to this forum via another one (y) )
I will try find it...alot of old timers were using brown sugar...it was only in the primary stages of research but they were investigating and thinking that this could happen...and might if explained some yield increases werent from the nutrition in the sugar but by N conversion from atmosphere...

Ant...
 

SimonD

Member
Location
Dorset
Who is using molasses this year and has anyone seen differing responses to different crop types. I know this is aimed principally at the soil but interesting to see if there’s any difference to crops response.
 

parker

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
south staffs
definitely using boost this year ,crops responded well last year and brix readings were higher where it had been used, also crop scorch was a lot less where used
 

SimonD

Member
Location
Dorset
definitely using boost this year ,crops responded well last year and brix readings were higher where it had been used, also crop scorch was a lot less where used
Were you using throughout the year or as a single application? I’m going to talk to them on Monday, nothing lost in doing so and to look at cost + delivery.
 

Clive

Staff Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Lichfield
Apologies for my ignorance, but what is the molasses meant to do? How does it work? Thanks,
It’s carb’s (sugar) for soil biology

Theory is feed them and they can work harder / do more / multiply faster

Not a lot of proof or research to back any of that up however ! Just gut feel for most and some observational in field tramline type rough and ready on farm comparison
 
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maize wheat

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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