Morrisons changes to reduce milk waste

Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton

Never taken any notice of use by dates myself

But perversely


Someone calls 999 after eating mouldy tomato sandwich.


Will it actually make a huge difference to the average consumer or volumes sold?
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
Just looked in the fridge, the milk says Best before. I thought that was normal.
Hopefully the processors don't take the same approach with the stuff in silos and still process it within a set time.
Storage is the biggest factor, that's why I prefer buying it at supermarkets because its fast moving and they have decent fridge capacity.
 

yin ewe

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co Antrim
Problem with milk is how it has been stored after purchase.
Stored in a fridge @4 degrees un opened it should last about 5 days after the date
Stored on the window sill in the sunshine it will be off long before the date.

Does my nut when people leave the milk out on the table at breakfast time, pour onto your cereal and return to fridge immediately.
No best before date on it though, comes fresh out of the bulk tank every day.
 

Jerry

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Devon
Every time I’ve heard this story on radio today they go in to say dairy is a major climate change contributor as well….Why say that??
 
The BBC couldn’t resist having a dig at the “dairy industries carbon emissions“ on tonight’s news item about it.
More fake news from the BBC. The story before was about immigrants in poor housing but during the interview in the background the trees were green and the interviewees were wearing short sleeved shirts - hardly today’s journalism! We only get told what THEY want us to hear 😡
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Use-by dates are a con. Especially so on things like drugs [the legal kind] and medical equipment such as masks, gloves and aprons. The date is there purely to produce waste and sell more product.
Just yesterday I took some Alka-Seltzer that was over two years past its use-by date. I’ve taken antibiotic tablets thar were spare that were five years past it and worked perfectly. Also had a box of teabags [Welsh Brew] that were over five years past it, some months ago and it was the best tea I’ve had in a long time and have bought more, fresh, Welsh Brew since.
Otoh have bought chicken and fish from Morrisons and Tesco periodically that were well ‘off’ by a day or two before their use-by date despite being refrigerated by me within an hour of purchase.
 

Bongodog

Member
Not sure if this is a great idea, we usually buy our milk at the nearest large Tesco once a week. The pure filtered stuff is dated at least 14 days ahead and the standard pasteurised at least 7 days. We don't rigidly stick to the dates and are quite happy to go a few days over, especially if the bottle has only just been opened. But we do have the date in front of us and won't buy a week's worth on the odd occasion that its short dated on the shelf, nor will we drink milk thats well over its date either.
How do you choose what to buy, or what to use 1st if there's no dates to assist you ? Even a can of food with 3 years of shelf life has a date to guide you. More or less everything you buy has a date on it somewhere, I discovered in December that we had had the same Christmas tree since 2003 by looking at its box.
 

Gong Farmer

Member
BASIS
Location
Glos
Use-by dates are a con. Especially so on things like drugs [the legal kind] and medical equipment such as masks, gloves and aprons. The date is there purely to produce waste and sell more product.
Just yesterday I took some Alka-Seltzer that was over two years past its use-by date. I’ve taken antibiotic tablets thar were spare that were five years past it and worked perfectly. Also had a box of teabags [Welsh Brew] that were over five years past it, some months ago and it was the best tea I’ve had in a long time and have bought more, fresh, Welsh Brew since.
Otoh have bought chicken and fish from Morrisons and Tesco periodically that were well ‘off’ by a day or two before their use-by date despite being refrigerated by me within an hour of purchase.
There are big safety margins added at each stage, from the initial research, to wholesaler to retailer, each subtracts a few days so most are unrealistic. When you see these dates on canned food, or even bags of salt, you realise it's meaningless.
 
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Alias

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Lancashire
If normal milk is going off, it starts to curdle and you get white bits floating in your tea. Would skimmed milk even do this, or will it just go rancid? Just wondering
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
A girl of 17 who comes here to ride ponies told me recently that she had 17 fractures from falling off. She said she never drinks milk. Admittedly, I don't ride but I have not knowingly broken a bone in my body my entire life and I am 82. (Some lumps and bumps in my hands, though, but none so bad that they stopped them working).

I attribute the above to my always drinking milk. Ever since the war when milk came from the family farm as it was something the government couldn't check. I'd drink a pint straight from the fridge. I still drink about 12L per week.

Discourage milk consumption and the NHS costs will go up.
 

Netherfield

Member
Location
West Yorkshire
Not sure if this is a great idea, we usually buy our milk at the nearest large Tesco once a week. The pure filtered stuff is dated at least 14 days ahead and the standard pasteurised at least 7 days. We don't rigidly stick to the dates and are quite happy to go a few days over, especially if the bottle has only just been opened. But we do have the date in front of us and won't buy a week's worth on the odd occasion that its short dated on the shelf, nor will we drink milk thats well over its date either.
How do you choose what to buy, or what to use 1st if there's no dates to assist you ? Even a can of food with 3 years of shelf life has a date to guide you. More or less everything you buy has a date on it somewhere, I discovered in December that we had had the same Christmas tree since 2003 by looking at its box.
The way I read it is, instead of 'use by' it will be 'best before'.

When my daughter first left home I would often get text messages from her, like, bacon is/meat is/tin of beans is out of date will it still be OK. My reply was usually 'is it green' she'd say 'no' I'd say 'it's fine then.

I bought Ice Cream from a company in Chesire, initially there were no dates at all, just a code for their own use. The boss once told me they'd kept ice cream frozen for 2 years or more, just as an experiment, and it came out still perfect, probably EU meddling brought in use by dates, which at the time the ice cream alliance set at 6 months from manufacture, this upset many firms who would rather get a build up of product during the winter months instead of having to find temporary staff or pay overtime during the summer months.

Longley farm cream was the same in the old days, never any dates people used their eyes and noses to see if it was still fit to eat.
 
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