Need help identifying these

torden

Member
Mixed Farmer
Hello. Can you help me identify these? What variety is this? It is edible?

They just popped up this summer in our garden, and we never had this kind planted before. They were 4, I broke one to see how's inside. The inside is light yellow, not very thick, and the seeds are white, beautiful and pretty "fat". Dimensions: 16 cm (6,2 inches) long, "meat" thickness - 2,5 to 3cm (1 inch or so...)
Thank you
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Wisconsonian

Member
Trade
Pumpkins, squash, gourds are all very promiscuous, they crossbreed widely and are among the most difficult seeds to produce true to type. Any volunteer from any of them will be quite different from the parent varieties. Those look like typical crossbred volunteer squash. Cook it and tell us if it's edible, it won't be poisonous.
 

primmiemoo

Member
Location
Devon
They may indeed be poisonous even from edible hybrids , however I do not believe anyone has died yet. Just disappointing to cook a meal to find it inedible

Wasn't there a problem with accidentally wrongly crossed courgette seeds last year? Pollination was from a squash, and the resulting vegetables were poisonous to some degree?
 

Bogweevil

Member
Discard immediately if bitter. They can be harmful and very very seldom fatal. If no bitterness then fine to eat.

Seeds from bought pumpkins often survive home composting and germinate in the garden.

Great pains are taken by the seed industry to avoid pollination of edible cucurbits by potentially harmful ones. Last year some courgette seed pollinated by inedible cucurbits was inadvertantly sold to amateur growers. It was a 'value' line, cheap, but of poor quality and of little use to commercial growers.
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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