1. Farmers, growers, processors and industry representatives are being asked for their views from 31 August for 10 weeks on the role of the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB).

    The AHDB is a UK statutory levy board, funded by farmers, growers and others in the supply chain. As we leave the EU, there is an opportunity to ensure that the sectors that the AHDB covers are as competitive as possible. This review will look at the AHDB’s purpose and priorities, its strengths and where improvements need to be made.

    This is a joint 10-week exercise covering England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The request for views will close on 9 November.

    click here to have your say...

    or

    go straight to Defra to fill out the survey here....
    Dismiss Notice

New Beef House

Discussion in 'Buildings & Infrastructure' started by Sir loin, Mar 23, 2013.

  1. Steakeater

    Steakeater Member

    Not even a concrete floor?
     
  2. Walterp

    Walterp Member

    Location:
    Pembrokeshire
    Some studies suggest that clamp silage can incur up to 20% waste, but no farmer has ever admitted this high a figure. Depending on the design of the clamp and its use, waste can easily be 10 across the shoulders/top and when feeding at self feed barriers or ring feeders?

    One thing you haven't mentioned is the possibility of saving even more money by making hay, if the weather is fine - cuts out the net entirely.
     
  3. multi power

    multi power Member

    Location:
    pembrokeshire
    no concreate anywhere
     
  4. multi power

    multi power Member

    Location:
    pembrokeshire
    thats a good point about making hay walter, we often simply make hay instead of silage, 30-50 acres at a time
     
    chibson01 likes this.
  5. Steakeater

    Steakeater Member

    Did it not turn into a bog feeding out in the winter? What about effluent?
     
  6. multi power

    multi power Member

    Location:
    pembrokeshire
    yes it was messy in winter, mud up to tractor rims but hard underneath, no effluent from dry silage
     
  7. multi power

    multi power Member

    Location:
    pembrokeshire
    if it was mine i would have concreated it but the farm owner was , lets say "carefull" with the pennies
     
  8. Thick Farmer

    Thick Farmer Member

    Location:
    West Wales
    What do the EA have to say about it?
     
  9. multi power

    multi power Member

    Location:
    pembrokeshire
    when they saw it they moaned a bit
     
  10. Sir loin

    Sir loin Member

    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    Walter lets move this thread on a bit and ask is baled hay/silage better for your stock than precision chopped clamp silage. My gut feeling would be yes it is but I cannot back this up!
     
  11. Walterp

    Walterp Member

    Location:
    Pembrokeshire
    Well, perhaps you can now - we moved from our own clamp operation, to a contractor's SP, to ordinary bales, and then to Fusion chopped bales. Chop length in the SP was a real problem for us because:
    1. clamp consolidation was difficult to achieve despite careful buckraking and rolling. Result was some mould (which we never had before,. or since, in either clamp or bales), and;
    2. cows were more content with having to chew on longer fibre, so that it took longer to go thru' 'em. That is, they say, better for the cow; in any event it seemed to slow 'em down a bit, which is what you are trying to achieve with a beef cow. It is, of course, the opposite of what my dairy farmer neighbours are seeking to achieve.
     
  12. DrDunc

    DrDunc Member

    Location:
    Dunsyre
    I thought that the short chop length was driven by what was needed to consolidate the clamp fast, and benefits speed of operation, not what was best fir the livestock.

    Chopped bales or forage wagon length is more the length cows eat when grazing (if it ever grows).

    Dairy cattle rations have straw included with clamp precision chopped silage to increase fibre length, dry matter, and introduce a "scratching" effect upon the rumen to stimulate digestion. Are these effects not similar to what is achieved with longer chop length?
     
    multi power and Walterp like this.
  13. aled1590

    aled1590 Member

    I know this is an old thread but planning a suckler shed similar to @DrDunc shed. How many cows will you keep in her comfortably? 100ft x 40ft isn’t it?
     
  14. DrDunc

    DrDunc Member

    Location:
    Dunsyre
    40 adults is comfortable without bullying at the feed barrier in my shed.
    That's 650/750 kg Shorthorns

    There are recommendation guides for how much space cattle need web housed. Somebody on here will one what they are I'm sure.
     
  15. dannewhouse

    dannewhouse Member

    Location:
    huddersfield
    the 120k for the combi wrapper would go a long way towards a clamp and possibly a forage wagon if you wanted to carry on doing it all yourself.
    I assume you have at least 1 helper? which you could juggle mowing, tedding rakeing and clamp work with. I realise lifting the sheet isn't as easy as just starting the baler again mind.

    i'm a bale man myself but I can see a forage wagon being a "compromise" keeping the process in house and removing a lot of the plastic problem. we do roughly 1k bales across 3 cuts so obviously aren't going to change the process soon.
     
  16. dannewhouse

    dannewhouse Member

    Location:
    huddersfield
    WP_20170101_001.jpg WP_20170101_002.jpg WP_20170101_003.jpg WP_20141125_026.jpg WP_20141125_027.jpg WP_20141125_032.jpg WP_20141125_033.jpg WP_20170101_001.jpg WP_20170101_002.jpg
    this is our cattle shed. 51 ft + cantilever each 30ft pen easily holds 25 sucklers. you have enough feeding space if its silage there nearly all time, not enough if your putting a dribble of corn as they cant all feed. our shed is 120ft long and will easily hold 100. 16ft to eaves, its about right, any higher getting a bit open but lower any you cant stack straw 4 high.
    scrape the front 15ft about every week with the bucket.
    2 gates means you can pen every group of cattle back separately and then use the whole length front to sort them (we have a lift in race system)
    imo going much wider with the shed is wasted unless you get to like 90ft to make full use of 2 feed fences. as 60-70ft is too much for 1 feed line but doesn't utilise 2.
    mucking out you can put 1 pens worth of cattle on the passage and clean their pen, then repeat with the next, never muddling them up.
    its not at all tight mucking out through front either, I don't see a benefit of being able to do whole shed at 1ce.

    I fancy making pit silage in 1 bay, don't go too high as only 4" panels on 100x100x10 box
    might do a bay on 150 panels just so I could put 2m of silage in, could face feed?
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
    aled1590 likes this.

Share This Page