New CLAAS Combine?

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
I think ive read somewhere that they wanted to build them all on the same chassis whereas the tucano had a narrow chassis the same as the dominators and was built on a different production line to lexions. I hope they have got a gear stick rather than electronic changes that take forever
 

MX7

Member
Location
cotswolds
Surely offering so many variations of a machine must lead to extra costs of production compared to offering say two variations of the basic machine. The costs passed on to the customer.
 

MX7

Member
Location
cotswolds
That’s the point of machines being modular. You only have what you need or want on a machine. Make it fit your farm
Surely if one sets up a production line for say 500 identical machines they can be produced cheaper than 500 machines all having slightly different variants ,that must surely require extra costs on the production line due to extra time incurred when fitting the different parts.
I just can’t understand why there is so much choice with virtually any thing one buys these days.
 

Matt L

Member
Trade
Location
Suffolk
It enables one production line to produce machines for a couple of hundred acres designed for a 5m cutterbar and machines for 4000+ acres with a 13m bar. The ultimate flexibility to react to market requirements.
it is all a very streamlined process where it doesn’t take long at all for components to be delivered to the station and fitted to the machine.
modern factory lines are seriously impressive.
 

Stewie

Member
Location
Northern Italy
It enables one production line to produce machines for a couple of hundred acres designed for a 5m cutterbar and machines for 4000+ acres with a 13m bar. The ultimate flexibility to react to market requirements.
it is all a very streamlined process where it doesn’t take long at all for components to be delivered to the station and fitted to the machine.
modern factory lines are seriously impressive.
It does increase cost of course, but not they way MX7 thinks. The production line would work by just in time anyway and the procurement/supply is fully automated, so no large increase in cost there. Where the big chunk of extra cost is generated is in design, simply because you need more variants and the modular platform must be managed, and in direct manufacturing cost, because the simpler, cheaper variants need to share the interfaces with the more complex ones, thus forcing additional complexity on them.
But companies do not do it for fun, but to stay in the market. The difficult part is where to find the balance, which like always in life is a trade-off.
 

Lowland1

Member
Mixed Farmer
Went LaManns factory last year and every tractor going down the line was a different model and spec. Tour guide said the staff prefer that as it adds variety to their day. The parts all arrive to the station ready to be fitted as per the spec sheet so doubt it takes any longer.
I am just buying a new Arion 820 nothing unsual in that except it’s the Tier 3 model they stopped selling in the UK in 2013 i wanted a new cab model but one of my New Hollands is playing up however it’s about £30,000 cheaper than the new UK spec tractor eg no front suspension 40 kmh transmission so no air brakes no CEBIS etc. But there are a lot of old models still built for certain markets.
 
Last edited:

Charles Quick

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Somerset
Had a play with one today - 730 single rotor on tracks.
Lovely to drive, cab is a big improvement and I can now stretch my legs out properly! Very quiet and smooth. Lots of cubby holes.
Mechanically much more simplified, less panelwork to catch dust, fewer hydraulic lines criss crossing about and easier access for repairs and blowing down. Nice features such as a little box to store the airline, and a water tank for handwashing. There is a dog clutch for the chopper now instead of the belt tensioning system.
Engine compartment refined, less bits to catch dust
Broke the unloading auger shear bolt - apparently not the first time it's happened this season.
About £250k I'm led to believe. PXL_20210818_174201987.jpgPXL_20210818_174804092.jpgPXL_20210818_174208111.jpg
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
So what’s the difference between a Lexion 7400 to a Trion 730? Both approx 408hp 🤷🏻‍♂️ What difference to the old Lexion 740 which would be the closest power wise to it? Engine bay looks easy to clean!
 

Charles Quick

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Somerset
The Lexion would be twin rotor.
Otherwise very little, the marketing chap agreed that it could steal a lot of lexion market share in the near term. Especially if you want a basic ish spec but with the newer cab and features.
I'm only guessing they must have a new line of lexions in the works to make the trion look inferior again.
Access around the engine is nice, and the whole left side of the bay is open so all the dust can escape when you blow it down. The cummins sounds lovely by the way!
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
The Lexion would be twin rotor.
Otherwise very little, the marketing chap agreed that it could steal a lot of lexion market share in the near term. Especially if you want a basic ish spec but with the newer cab and features.
I'm only guessing they must have a new line of lexions in the works to make the trion look inferior again.
Access around the engine is nice, and the whole left side of the bay is open so all the dust can escape when you blow it down. The cummins sounds lovely by the way!
With the 8000 and 7000 series Lexion recently being released I can’t see them releasing another lot…
 

Secret Agronomist

Member
Arable Farmer
Had a play with one today - 730 single rotor on tracks.
Lovely to drive, cab is a big improvement and I can now stretch my legs out properly! Very quiet and smooth. Lots of cubby holes.
Mechanically much more simplified, less panelwork to catch dust, fewer hydraulic lines criss crossing about and easier access for repairs and blowing down. Nice features such as a little box to store the airline, and a water tank for handwashing. There is a dog clutch for the chopper now instead of the belt tensioning system.
Engine compartment refined, less bits to catch dust
Broke the unloading auger shear bolt - apparently not the first time it's happened this season.
About £250k I'm led to believe.View attachment 980577View attachment 980579View attachment 980581
If that's right then it sound's like a good little machine!
What sort of output were you getting and what was the straw like?
 

Charles Quick

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Somerset
Swath was very fluffy and tall, the straw seemed good quality. I was told it's a tradeoff between straw quality and output, and it wasn't being pushed hard yesterday. I didn't take much notice of t/hr, but I think it was mid 30's cutting 17% wheat.
 

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
Swath was very fluffy and tall, the straw seemed good quality. I was told it's a tradeoff between straw quality and output, and it wasn't being pushed hard yesterday. I didn't take much notice of t/hr, but I think it was mid 30's cutting 17% wheat.
Am I right in saying all the rotarys are narrow body with single rotor and there is 5 and 6 Walker ones too but the guts of a Trion 650 and my Lexion 650 are identical even same hp and tank size
 

Vader

Member
What lexion or tucano you guys recommend for knocking about 50 acres a day down?
Hilly ground.
We been running an old lexy410 as it was fine on organic crops.
Average field size 20 acres.

But now farming properly again we keep getting engine overload going up the steeper bits or thick crops with chopper running.
 

CHAP Webinar - Innovative tools to overcome the challenges of Regen Ag

  • 391
  • 1
https%3A%2F%2Fcdn.evbuc.com%2Fimages%2F186160299%2F486662465563%2F1%2Foriginal.20211115-160823


Applying principles of regen ag can incur a range of on-farm challenges. Learn how innovative tools & machinery can help with these hurdles.

This event will be held online from 1pm to 2pm on Thursday 2nd December 2021 so please block it out in your diary.

About this event​

Intro
This...
Top