New quarantine

Discussion in 'Livestock & Forage' started by Benn, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. Benn

    Benn Member

    Buying in sheep from tgree differnt farms
    Last time brought sheep in i used zolvix and trodax and kept in for a week.anything else jab them with?
    If i do tgis can i still heptavac them as some not on system or should i just wait and heptavac them along with breeding ewes with first jab fourweeks before?
     
  2. S J H

    S J H Member

    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    I zolvix them and footbath in formalin, leave them isolated for as long as possible, so probably until tupping.
     
  3. GTB

    GTB Member

    Location:
    Ceredigion, wales
    What about scab? Might be worth jabbing them with dectomax or cydectin or dipping.

    We only buy the occasional ram in but we always zolvix, cydectin and footbath them and if we have any Covexin or Heptavac on the go we'll do them with that too.
     
    Benn likes this.
  4. We zolvix, flukiver and keep in for a few days and run them through the footbath a few times (gets them used to the handling system too). Been lucky with scab so far. But started jabbing for it this year as we have too many sheep to risk bringing it in now. Normally hep and fly treat them too. All sheep when sold have had this done, but I tend to go by the " believe half of what you see, and nothing of what you hear" philosophy
     
  5. Tim W

    Tim W Member

    Location:
    Wiltshire
    Ivermectin for scab and worms
    Zolvix for worms
    LA AB in case of footrot/COD
    Appropriate drug for fluke

    Isolate for as long as possible ---preferably 6 months +
    If not from MV acc. flocks then you should test for MV
    A pooled OJD dung sample will cost £30?

    If you get fluke/COD/MV all the above will be very cheap in comparison
     
    TexelBen, neilo and Benn like this.
  6. neilo

    neilo Member

    Location:
    Montgomeryshire
    I'd be inclined to footbath a group in lincospectin/tylosin rather than formalin, in order to keep CODD out (for which formalin will do nowt). If odd ones, then a healthy shot of Tylan inj would work out cheaper (which is what I do now).
    I drench with Startect or Zolvix, jab for fluke with Trodax, inj Cydectin LA for scab, then keep them isolated in a shed for a week or so if I can. I only ever buy in small numbers though.

    @Benn , there's little point doing quarantine drenches then turning them straight on a pasture to shed potentially resistant fluke or worms there. Keep them in a shed or yard for a day or so to empty out.
     
  7. Benn

    Benn Member

    @neilo was going keep them in lambing tunnel thats deep bedded for a week?or is that going be sn issue and better kept away in place were no otger sheep are kept
     
  8. S J H

    S J H Member

    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    So would you Tylan them all @neilo rather than footbath?
     
  9. Jim75

    Jim75 Member

    Location:
    Inverness
    If you had the fields would putting them out on to stubble for a few days be suitable. Said stubble fields wouldn't be in grass rotation for resistant worms? Presuming it will be ok
     
    neilo likes this.
  10. neilo

    neilo Member

    Location:
    Montgomeryshire
    I only ever bring in the odd one now, usually a ram, so in that case, yes. It would cost more to fill a footbath with ab's and then run them through daily for 3 days or more. Probably less effective too.
    If I were buying a bigger bunch of ewes in, then footbathing would be far cheaper.
     
    S J H likes this.
  11. neilo

    neilo Member

    Location:
    Montgomeryshire
    I normally keep mine in a shed, but not always feasible if it were a big group like replacement ewes. Anywhere where any resistant worms would end up in the muck heap, rather than dumped straight onto grazing fields.
     
    Benn likes this.
  12. Benn

    Benn Member

    Im buying three batches do i have to clean out shed between batches??
     
  13. scholland

    scholland Member

    Location:
    ze3
    All sheep entering Shetland get eae test, mv test, cla test, Dectomax, zolvix, vet visual assessment for cla and codd. Talk of trying scan test for opa this year. Will also need follow up mv test 6 months post import.
    Quarantine also hugely important until results are all clear.
     
    Tim W likes this.
  14. neilo

    neilo Member

    Location:
    Montgomeryshire
    I wouldn't bother. They shouldn't pick anything up in there, it's just somewhere to dump out any resistant eggs, away from pasture. Personally I wouldn't be too bothered about cleaning out until next Spring/Summer. They'll be buried in the muck and killed off (probably:unsure:).
     
    Benn likes this.
  15. Benn

    Benn Member

    Cgeers .
     
  16. Danllan

    Danllan Member

    Latest advice from my vet, but for a single good ram, is: i.m. dectomax and a fasinex drench, with formalin foot-bathing on arrival and again a few days later. Then keep him in a shed for 48 hours to be sure everything has passed out of him, and then feet again before turning out. This doesn't cater for codd or cla other than visually, so now I am wondering...
     
  17. Benn

    Benn Member

    Talked to a sheep farmer who mentioned about enzovax and toxovax to all bought in ewes if buying from different farms ,he explained the issue with enzo and about buying from eae accredited farm and explained what eae accredited actually meant which Before i understood to be conplete opposite
    i knew about toxo which give a month before lambing but didbt know about Enzo and i forgot when he said to vaccinated on quarentine or month before lambing?
    @neilo @GTB @Tim W
     
  18. neilo

    neilo Member

    Location:
    Montgomeryshire
    If you decide to do Enzovac/Cevac Chlamidia (cheaper;)), it needs to be done a month before tupping, and can be done at the same time as Toxovax. Cevac was about a quid a sheep last time I did it (2 yrs ago), so much cheaper than the criminal price charged for Toxovax now.:mad: Have dropped EAE vaccine now, to help pay for the Toxovax hike.

    EAE accredited just means the flock has been tested to show they have had no cases of EAE. If your flock us a similar status, then they may be worth paying a premium for. If there is a chance that your own flock may contain EAE infected (or carrier) ewes, or you are buying in from similar, then EAE accredited ewes are naive and totally open to picking up the bug.
     
    GTB, Benn and Tim W like this.
  19. Benn

    Benn Member

    Im biying some from a different breeder tommorrow is there a certificate to show eae accredited.
     
  20. bovine

    bovine Member

    Location:
    North
    EAE accreditation is pretty meaningless. If you want a candid view from a man that knows, speak to George Caldow at the SAC
     
    Nithsdale Farmer likes this.

Share This Page