New toy day

Farmer_Joe

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
The North
We have been growing lucerne for 10 years now and the main problem was the crop becoming weedy,we tried kerb during winter a few times but it was next to useless , then we had a french farmer visit us and suggested glyphosate in the winter, which we tried last year and it was a total success , extremely clean and the lucerne has never looked better. If anyone is interested i can look up the rate we used.
We cut our lucerne same stubble length as the grass. Good yields and to be honest we should have cut it second cut last week. Normally would be third now but everything’s behind this year.
A brilliant crop once it's established, i'm amazed more people don't grow it!
You guys keep it for a few years then?
Thinking of trying a few acres will let lambs graze it after a cut maybe rest it in winter but would like a few years off it does that sound like it would work?
 

Mark C

Member
Location
Bedfordshire
You should leave it be after the autumn. It doesn’t like compaction. I sprayed mine with roundup this spring but because it was so wet I waited too long and I thought I had killed it. It absolutely mullered it. It came back after about 3 weeks.
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
Agreed, lucerne (and red clover for that matter) must not be cut short or pounded by tankers etc when it is wet. I would also let it grow on comfortably to give a bit of biomass (and root reserves) prior to the onset of winter.
Yes those 2 come to mind particularly as not liking it but nothing, grass clovers etc likes to be shaved tight ,quicker regrowth is the first big advantage
in any case Its only poor quality stuff down there in the :X3:.....and possibly there's a few flints in that particular area referred to, as well .:cautious:
Mostly grazed mine though tbh. with just one cut per year.
 

Daniel

Member
It was set to replace our older 110 originally, but with the way business is going, ever increasing workload, the need for a loader and just general planning for the future we decided to try and add it as an addition rather than replace anything in the end. We've given the 130CVX a bit of a birthday recently (whilst it was having its main ad blue dosing unit replaced!) and it's going as well if not better than it did when it was new!

And yes, the extended wheelbase is a massive improvement with regards comfort and grip, they've squuezed as much as they can out of the steering lock to make that as good as is ever possible and it turns damn near as well as the other two! View attachment 976052

Lovely fleet!
 

Shebb90

Member
Location
Devon
1627223962705233622584711808388.jpg

Picked this up Friday
 
Thankyou,
Can you graze in winter or do they need rest?
How long can you let it get before cutting ?
Yes you can, provided the ground isnt soaking wet. We graze dairy heifers IF it isnt a wet winter.....because of the bare patches between crowns plugging will occur if wet.

Winter growth depends on the dormancy number associated with the variety. The lower the number the more winter dormant. The higher the number (10 max) the more winter active. The trade off is winter active will have a significant less life span as a stand.

Cutting height is irrelevant. It's the stage of flowering that determines that. Rule of thumb. Less than 10% But if doing it for rocket fuel for dairy cattle you want to be slightly less again.
 
Yes you can, provided the ground isnt soaking wet. We graze dairy heifers IF it isnt a wet winter.....because of the bare patches between crowns plugging will occur if wet.

Winter growth depends on the dormancy number associated with the variety. The lower the number the more winter dormant. The higher the number (10 max) the more winter active. The trade off is winter active will have a significant less life span as a stand.

Cutting height is irrelevant. It's the stage of flowering that determines that. Rule of thumb. Less than 10% But if doing it for rocket fuel for dairy cattle you want to be slightly less again.
Are you saying the more flower when you cut the lower the persistence is?
 
Are you saying the more flower when you cut the lower the persistence is?
No. Far from it. The more flower the lower the feed value.(you will generally get more bulk if you let it get to 30-50% but a much lower rfi) It is ideal to let it flower properly before the end of the season (and winter) particularly if you live in an area where you get snow and hard frost as this let's the plant build its starches up to keep it going.

I generally sow a "7" which gives moderate winter grazing (generally early winter/ late autumn when it's to dewy to make hay....as lucerne bleaches easily). Trade off with higher numbers is a higher set crown on the plant (more prone to damage) and a thicker stem (not preferred for premium hay markets) . This year (next few months) I will be sowing a new 75ac stand and it will most likely be a "3" as I'm chasing premium... at worst it will be a "5". Another oddity with the "3" is it has a longer window regarding cutting. The current 7 I have needs cutting every 28 days over summer (I got 6 cuts last season) . If theres rain forecast and you wait 4 or 5 days its flowered way to much. The 3 I'm looking at is much more forgiving apparently.
 
Last edited:

CHAP Webinar - Innovative tools to overcome the challenges of Regen Ag

  • 251
  • 0
https%3A%2F%2Fcdn.evbuc.com%2Fimages%2F186160299%2F486662465563%2F1%2Foriginal.20211115-160823


Applying principles of regen ag can incur a range of on-farm challenges. Learn how innovative tools & machinery can help with these hurdles.

This event will be held online from 1pm to 2pm on Thursday 2nd December 2021 so please block it out in your diary.

About this event​

Intro
This...
Top