No very promising for shellfish producers.

manhill

Member
Is there a form to record antibiotics etc given to injured fish? If not there should be because the EU must maintain its high standards. Read the article on the BBC website about 27 pages of bs to be filled in before a truck of fish goes across the water. The world has gone mad. I thought RT was bad but bloody hell!
I have to feel sorry for the younger generations who will waste a significant part of their lives tied up in regulations.
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
The fishing industry have shot themselves in the foot. When 95% of all fish and shellfish is exported to the EU they were vehement in leaving the EU. They knew the rules that they would have to follow once out of the EU and it seems that the shellfish industry ignored or just had their heads in the sand thinking that they could do as before. There is no ban it is just that the shellfish industry were not prepared for the EU exit and now that they have to follow existing rules for countries outside the EU, to export to the EU they are complaining.
It really is not a problem. If you actually understand what is happening on the ground the catch is still being landed by UK vessels but at Danish ports rather than UK ports. Its only a problem for those landing at UK ports and then getting lost in red tape.
 

essexpete

Member
Location
Essex
It really is not a problem. If you actually understand what is happening on the ground the catch is still being landed by UK vessels but at Danish ports rather than UK ports. Its only a problem for those landing at UK ports and then getting lost in red tape.
Only the proper sea going large boats can do that. The inshore wet fish and shell fish are going to land in UK. As the post above, many probably point the gun at their own foot.
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
Only the proper sea going large boats can do that. The inshore wet fish and shell fish are going to land in UK. As the post above, many probably point the gun at their own foot.
Ok landing in UK for UK market but for EU the inshore fleet should use factory ships and land direct in Denmark.
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
that is unbelivable
Always remember the UK wrote these Third Country rules, pushed for them to be like this to protect the UK market , while an EU member.
Frost knew what he was signing you up for!
DEFRA begged for equivalency, Frost said no!

I'm starting to think that they've engineered this , if you look at NI/ UK internal market collapse, to rip up the deal and walk to WTO and go full Singapore for the city. Fudge business! The City rules!

Boris promised a deal and got one for the plebs. He promised the fat cats he wouldn't and now delivers!
He'll blame the EU
 

B'o'B

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Rutland
Always remember the UK wrote these Third Country rules, pushed for them to be like this to protect the UK market , while an EU member.
Frost knew what he was signing you up for!
DEFRA begged for equivalency, Frost said no!

I'm starting to think that they've engineered this , if you look at NI/ UK internal market collapse, to rip up the deal and walk to WTO and go full Singapore for the city. Fudge business! The City rules!

Boris promised a deal and got one for the plebs. He promised the fat cats he wouldn't and now delivers!
He'll blame the EU
I did have the feeling for much of Boris’s tenure that we were heading towards no deal. About the only thing that made me doubt it was the lack of infrastructure and systems preparation that was going on for that, which I will never get my head around as most of it would have been quite useful in most outcomes other than a very comprehensive trade deal, which wasn’t very likely as they definitely weren’t negotiating for that.
Oh well, keep calm and carry on.
 

H200GT

Member
Location
NORTH WALES
Brexit was always going to bring about change. We are only just over a month into it, it will take time to settle in and for all to get accustomed to what required for imports & exports, and its nowhere near as bad as the some of the doomsday post brexit predictions.

As it would happen world trade is massively depressed at the moment and it will all be worked out and sorted over the next 12 months ready for the recovery.

Overall I would say it’s going relatively well all things considered
 

Ncap

Member
Brexit was always going to bring about change. We are only just over a month into it, it will take time to settle in and for all to get accustomed to what required for imports & exports, and its nowhere near as bad as the some of the doomsday post brexit predictions.

As it would happen world trade is massively depressed at the moment and it will all be worked out and sorted over the next 12 months ready for the recovery.

Overall I would say it’s going relatively well all things considered
Ha ha ha ha ha ha .
Captain of Titanic: "Just stopping to pick up some more ice for the cocktail bar"
 

H200GT

Member
Location
NORTH WALES
Ha ha ha ha ha ha .
Captain of Titanic: "Just stopping to pick up some more ice for the cocktail bar"
Well its certainly nothing like some of the doomsday post brexit predictions which included fuel shortages, food shortages, huge tailbacks at the borders and civil unrest. Not seeing any of that are we.

I concede that there are issues at the borders with trade, especially around the documents needed for imports and exports, but by and large goods are moving and I am not sure what the NI situation is currently like, things may be a bit more difficult here. There were some stats in the papers over the weekend suggesting trade is down over 50% compared to last year at the borders, but I suspect that most of that is due to Covid not Brexit, after all if there was a demand for the goods but border restrictions were holding them up then it would be all over the news, and some of the UK news outlets would love to hype this up if the were given half a chance.

It may well have been a different story if it wasn't for Covid, its done a great job in suppressing world trade and I suspect the lower demand is helping things at the borders at present.

Overall its early days, and whilst not perfect, its certainly not the poo show it could have been
 

Ncap

Member
Well its certainly nothing like some of the doomsday post brexit predictions which included fuel shortages, food shortages, huge tailbacks at the borders and civil unrest. Not seeing any of that are we.

I concede that there are issues at the borders with trade, especially around the documents needed for imports and exports, but by and large goods are moving and I am not sure what the NI situation is currently like, things may be a bit more difficult here. There were some stats in the papers over the weekend suggesting trade is down over 50% compared to last year at the borders, but I suspect that most of that is due to Covid not Brexit, after all if there was a demand for the goods but border restrictions were holding them up then it would be all over the news, and some of the UK news outlets would love to hype this up if the were given half a chance.

It may well have been a different story if it wasn't for Covid, its done a great job in suppressing world trade and I suspect the lower demand is helping things at the borders at present.

Overall its early days, and whilst not perfect, its certainly not the poo show it could have been
 

Attachments

Ashtree

Member
Well its certainly nothing like some of the doomsday post brexit predictions which included fuel shortages, food shortages, huge tailbacks at the borders and civil unrest. Not seeing any of that are we.

I concede that there are issues at the borders with trade, especially around the documents needed for imports and exports, but by and large goods are moving and I am not sure what the NI situation is currently like, things may be a bit more difficult here. There were some stats in the papers over the weekend suggesting trade is down over 50% compared to last year at the borders, but I suspect that most of that is due to Covid not Brexit, after all if there was a demand for the goods but border restrictions were holding them up then it would be all over the news, and some of the UK news outlets would love to hype this up if the were given half a chance.

It may well have been a different story if it wasn't for Covid, its done a great job in suppressing world trade and I suspect the lower demand is helping things at the borders at present.

Overall its early days, and whilst not perfect, its certainly not the poo show it could have been
The so called “doomsday” scenarios you reference, were in relation to the no deal scenario, so beloved of the hard core Brexiteers. Imagine what that would be like, if this wonderful deal is causing such pain.
 

czechmate

Member
Mixed Farmer
Well its certainly nothing like some of the doomsday post brexit predictions which included fuel shortages, food shortages, huge tailbacks at the borders and civil unrest. Not seeing any of that are we.

I concede that there are issues at the borders with trade, especially around the documents needed for imports and exports, but by and large goods are moving and I am not sure what the NI situation is currently like, things may be a bit more difficult here. There were some stats in the papers over the weekend suggesting trade is down over 50% compared to last year at the borders, but I suspect that most of that is due to Covid not Brexit, after all if there was a demand for the goods but border restrictions were holding them up then it would be all over the news, and some of the UK news outlets would love to hype this up if the were given half a chance.

It may well have been a different story if it wasn't for Covid, its done a great job in suppressing world trade and I suspect the lower demand is helping things at the borders at present.

Overall its early days, and whilst not perfect, its certainly not the poo show it could have been
Yes, Covid-19 has been the saviour of the brexiteers.
all part of the rich tapestry ...
 

Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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