Not dribbling N down the tramlines.

Aceface

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
About 7 or 8 years ago I picked up a leaflet at either Cereals or Lamma (which may or may not have been produced by Omex). It gave the usual reasons why switching to the use of liquid had advantages over the use of solid N, such as no bags to dispose of, accurate dressing up to the outer edge of the crop, the freeing up of shed space etc, etc. However, I am sure one of it's points was that by blocking off the jets that are over the tramlines, that wasted N can be largely avoided. Each year I think about doing this, but I have never done it, because I like my boom high when using liquid N and you only need a slight breeze for the jets you have blocked to be off target. However this year, if I block 2 or perhaps 3 spouts per wheeling, (out of the 192 over a 24 metre boom), that will be over 2 or 3% of valurable N not wasted. Does anyone actually do this in practise?, or is it just a better idea on paper than in practise?.
Any thoughts will be appreciated, many thanks.
 

Aceface

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Surely the crop has roots underneath the tramlines so this nutrient won’t be wasted?

When I was a student 35 years ago, often crops of wheat on the fertile silts, would have crops of wheat, lodged flat to the floor due to too much N and weak straw, the only stems upright, were the ones immediately adjacent to the tramlines. This was explained to me as a student as evidence that those plants near the tramline having had their roots damaged by compaction and therefore were unable to take up excessive N. (Those plants would also have access to the prills in the tramlines). That explanation makes sense to me still.
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
About 7 or 8 years ago I picked up a leaflet at either Cereals or Lamma (which may or may not have been produced by Omex). It gave the usual reasons why switching to the use of liquid had advantages over the use of solid N, such as no bags to dispose of, accurate dressing up to the outer edge of the crop, the freeing up of shed space etc, etc. However, I am sure one of it's points was that by blocking off the jets that are over the tramlines, that wasted N can be largely avoided. Each year I think about doing this, but I have never done it, because I like my boom high when using liquid N and you only need a slight breeze for the jets you have blocked to be off target. However this year, if I block 2 or perhaps 3 spouts per wheeling, (out of the 192 over a 24 metre boom), that will be over 2 or 3% of valurable N not wasted. Does anyone actually do this in practise?, or is it just a better idea on paper than in practise?.
Any thoughts will be appreciated, many thanks.
Some farmers are trying to use wider row spacing's, to the point its all tramlines, what happens then?
 

Aceface

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Wide row widths are one thing, but growers will only run the sprayer and spreader down the same wheelings the whole season. Roots will be unrestricted between the widest of rows if they aren't used as tramlines, surely.
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Wide row widths are one thing, but growers will only run the sprayer and spreader down the same wheelings the whole season. Roots will be unrestricted between the widest of rows if they aren't used as tramlines, surely.
Not sure as some of these wide row farmers are now going to combine drilling fert to get it near the roots?
 
Last edited:

Aceface

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Are you saying that "top dressing" N will be injected into the soil using a drill in the spring?, even if this is done, each wide row will not be used as a tramline. With N being so mobile in the soil, I can't see the point and cost benefit of this, unless it is to trap urea under ground, and there are easier and cheaper ways to prevent volatilisation.

Not sue as some of these wide row farmers are now going to combine drilling fert to get it near the roots?
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Are you saying that "top dressing" N will be injected into the soil using a drill in the spring?, even if this is done, each wide row will not be used as a tramline. With N being so mobile in the soil, I can't see the point and cost benefit of this, unless it is to trap urea under ground, and there are easier and cheaper ways to prevent volatilisation.
No, combine drilling is drilling fert and seed at the same time, usually into the same slot.
 

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
On 10” row crops it’s not worth doing as there’s very little waste, 0.5/24m tramlines = 2%

But with the current fashion for leaving 650’s on all year round it may be worth doing (with nozzles on 500 centres). 1.3/24=5%
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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