Old agricultural merchants

This nice old Norfolk farm machinery club journal arrived today, spent a nice bit of time looking through after lunch. Lovely old ads from days gone by and a few good articles too
 

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Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
In those days the East Anglian ( the Suffolk newspaper ) carried 4 pages of agricultural news every day.
That days edition started with the story that the MMB was considering marketing it’s own range of dairy equipment, milking machines etc. The dairy manufacturers association were up in arms! There were also yesterdays market reports from 10-15 markets across Suffolk for cattle pigs etc.
 
In those days the East Anglian ( the Suffolk newspaper ) carried 4 pages of agricultural news every day.
That days edition started with the story that the MMB was considering marketing it’s own range of dairy equipment, milking machines etc. The dairy manufacturers association were up in arms! There were also yesterdays market reports from 10-15 markets across Suffolk for cattle pigs etc.
That is interesting I didn't realise that, farm mechanisation would of been my local dealer. I have looked for information in Suffolk record office etc but unfortunately nothing exists with them. May have to see if I can find a few old east anglians. I presume edp would be the same?
 
F.H. Burgess springs to mind in the West Midlands.

Frederick H. Burgess founded his ironmongers and agricultural implement business in Eccleshall in 1900. The business was a success and by 1912 the headquarters had moved to Stafford, with branches in Newcastle-under-Lyme, Wolverhampton and Newport, as well as in Eccleshall. In 1934 F.H. Burgess died and the company was taken over by his sons H.F. and W.D. Burgess. The following year saw a new branch open in Lichfield and amalgamation with its chief competitor: Woodings, who were dealers for Massey-Harris. Further acquisitions followed and by 1942 Frederick H. Burgess Ltd was the biggest agricultural machinery dealer in the West Midlands and north west, with branches in Ormskirk, Northwich, Liverpool, Warrington, St. Helens, Worcester, Hereford, Leominster, Bromyard and Tenbury. By this time it employed 1,180 staff and a had a fleet of 350 service vehicles.

In 2003 the Eccleshall store closed and moved to Ladfordfields Industrial Estate at Great Bridgeford. In 2008 Burgess Agricultural Engineers Ltd went into administration, and the final seven branches closed: these were in Shrewsbury, Chester, Nantwich, Llangefni, Denbigh, Leek and Barton-under-Needwood

Whilst checking on the details I did come across this wonderful site of old farming photos in the Staffordshire area well worth a look if you know that area.

850658


850671
 
F.H. Burgess springs to mind in the West Midlands.

Frederick H. Burgess founded his ironmongers and agricultural implement business in Eccleshall in 1900. The business was a success and by 1912 the headquarters had moved to Stafford, with branches in Newcastle-under-Lyme, Wolverhampton and Newport, as well as in Eccleshall. In 1934 F.H. Burgess died and the company was taken over by his sons H.F. and W.D. Burgess. The following year saw a new branch open in Lichfield and amalgamation with its chief competitor: Woodings, who were dealers for Massey-Harris. Further acquisitions followed and by 1942 Frederick H. Burgess Ltd was the biggest agricultural machinery dealer in the West Midlands and north west, with branches in Ormskirk, Northwich, Liverpool, Warrington, St. Helens, Worcester, Hereford, Leominster, Bromyard and Tenbury. By this time it employed 1,180 staff and a had a fleet of 350 service vehicles.

In 2003 the Eccleshall store closed and moved to Ladfordfields Industrial Estate at Great Bridgeford. In 2008 Burgess Agricultural Engineers Ltd went into administration, and the final seven branches closed: these were in Shrewsbury, Chester, Nantwich, Llangefni, Denbigh, Leek and Barton-under-Needwood

Whilst checking on the details I did come across this wonderful site of old farming photos in the Staffordshire area well worth a look if you know that area.

View attachment 850658

View attachment 850671
Some great pictures on the website thanks for sharing ?
 

Gadget

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Sutton Coldfield
F.H. Burgess springs to mind in the West Midlands.

Frederick H. Burgess founded his ironmongers and agricultural implement business in Eccleshall in 1900. The business was a success and by 1912 the headquarters had moved to Stafford, with branches in Newcastle-under-Lyme, Wolverhampton and Newport, as well as in Eccleshall. In 1934 F.H. Burgess died and the company was taken over by his sons H.F. and W.D. Burgess. The following year saw a new branch open in Lichfield and amalgamation with its chief competitor: Woodings, who were dealers for Massey-Harris. Further acquisitions followed and by 1942 Frederick H. Burgess Ltd was the biggest agricultural machinery dealer in the West Midlands and north west, with branches in Ormskirk, Northwich, Liverpool, Warrington, St. Helens, Worcester, Hereford, Leominster, Bromyard and Tenbury. By this time it employed 1,180 staff and a had a fleet of 350 service vehicles.

In 2003 the Eccleshall store closed and moved to Ladfordfields Industrial Estate at Great Bridgeford. In 2008 Burgess Agricultural Engineers Ltd went into administration, and the final seven branches closed: these were in Shrewsbury, Chester, Nantwich, Llangefni, Denbigh, Leek and Barton-under-Needwood

Whilst checking on the details I did come across this wonderful site of old farming photos in the Staffordshire area well worth a look if you know that area.

My father’s account number at Lichfield was 002, the farmers who were 001 are also still farming locally.
Burgess’ had their branches, that I know of, next to the local cattle markets. It made them very valuable later as they were mainly in town centres.
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
That's a nice one im going to try collect a few of these I think, never heard of page hunton ltd, that's why I like these always something new to look at. Interesting article about your farm as well, I know that area fairly well lovely part of the world
Page huntons was a foundry/blacksmiths who sold a wide range of farm supplies and equipment. Until recently we had a 12 ton bulk bin with the sticker supplied by page huntons Ltd.

When they were ferguson agent they actually invented the ferguson game flushed to go on the front of a tea fergy to flush game from grass ahead of a rear mounted finger bar mower.

Also the "page" part of the company was my great great grandad on my mums side.


I have got a few ring binders full of adverts and brochures from the 50's and 60's that I could take some pictures of if anyones interested.
 

bobk

Member
Location
stafford
FH Burgess were huge around here , excellent to deal with until the 90's when it started to go pear shaped .

They didn't upgrade to the newer technology and therefore got left behind .

All their outlets were in market town centres which made them extremely valuable .

A disgrace the company were put in to administration whilst the owners kept the freeholds and sold them off one by one

Eccleshall made £7m alone
 
Page huntons was a foundry/blacksmiths who sold a wide range of farm supplies and equipment. Until recently we had a 12 ton bulk bin with the sticker supplied by page huntons Ltd.

When they were ferguson agent they actually invented the ferguson game flushed to go on the front of a tea fergy to flush game from grass ahead of a rear mounted finger bar mower.

Also the "page" part of the company was my great great grandad on my mums side.


I have got a few ring binders full of adverts and brochures from the 50's and 60's that I could take some pictures of if anyones interested.
I didn't realise they had invented the game flusher, rare bit of kit only ever seen a few at shows. I'd be really interested in seeing some pictures if you wouldn't mind I'm actually thinking would be great to try and get a book together to record all of the dealers past and present don't think anything exists as such and some information I have found only exists from talking to people no actual recorded information as such Norfolk tractors being one such example.
 
My father’s account number at Lichfield was 002, the farmers who were 001 are also still farming locally.
Burgess’ had their branches, that I know of, next to the local cattle markets. It made them very valuable later as they were mainly in town centres.
I was informed not long ago that burgess used to send surplus tractors
And machinery to Lichfield depot as it was situated next door to winterton auction
He told me that he bought a fordson major based county crawler cheap in
The 60's as they were going out of fashion with equal wheel county tractors becoming common
 
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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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