OPA in Sheep

Lambsclose

New Member
I bought some gimmer lambs in the sales last year to run on and keep some grass down with the intention of selling them this Autumn, that was the plan. Last week one looked a bit off so got in the pens gave it a jab and if it didn’t perk up by the next day vet job might be cheaper than paying the knacker man . Long story short after a pm it had OPA which is infectious but rare in young sheep so the rest of them could have it . I was told I probably bought it with it . I come to the decision to sell them for meat .
Should I contact the previous seller that he possibly has OPA in his flock ?
 
I bought some gimmer lambs in the sales last year to run on and keep some grass down with the intention of selling them this Autumn, that was the plan. Last week one looked a bit off so got in the pens gave it a jab and if it didn’t perk up by the next day vet job might be cheaper than paying the knacker man . Long story short after a pm it had OPA which is infectious but rare in young sheep so the rest of them could have it . I was told I probably bought it with it . I come to the decision to sell them for meat .
Should I contact the previous seller that he possibly has OPA in his flock ?
OPA is not that infectious. What breed are they? The Scottish Blackface are rotten with it and any thing bred of them. It's spread through the breeding. Good luck with the previous owner, in my experience they will deny they have a problem.
You can expect to anything up to 10% per year mortality with it.
 

Tim W

Member
Location
Wiltshire
OPA is not that infectious. What breed are they? The Scottish Blackface are rotten with it and any thing bred of them. It's spread through the breeding

I think it's a retrovirus ---spreads through inhalation of airborne virus/snot & mucus from infected animals and milk/colostrum
So it is quite infectious (otherwise it wouldn't be spread through a whole population?) especially in housed animals

You can scan for early development and there are good case studies of flocks scanning/culling their way out of it ---but the scanning isn't that accurate and it needs to be done on a 6 monthly basis to be effective i think?

Tell the seller that he has it ----it's then his/her responsibility to do something
 

Lambsclose

New Member
OPA is not that infectious. What breed are they? The Scottish Blackface are rotten with it and any thing bred of them. It's spread through the breeding. Good luck with the previous owner, in my experience they will deny they have a problem.
You can expect to anything up to 10% per year mortality with it.
I don’t expect any money from them
 
I think it's a retrovirus ---spreads through inhalation of airborne virus/snot & mucus from infected animals and milk/colostrum
So it is quite infectious (otherwise it wouldn't be spread through a whole population?) especially in housed animals

You can scan for early development and there are good case studies of flocks scanning/culling their way out of it ---but the scanning isn't that accurate and it needs to be done on a 6 monthly basis to be effective i think?

Tell the seller that he has it ----it's then his/her responsibility to do something
Anytime I challenge those who sell me Scotch Mules that have OPA they claim they don't have it and there sheep must have been infected by someone else's.

I thought that if I started scanning mine to identify those with OPA earlier it would reduce the risk of sheep to sheep spread. The scanner I approached was happy to come and scan them,which he did ,but didn't think it would have any effect on the numbers that were going down with OPA.

He said that when he scanned a flock ever six months he was halving the number found and after five years they weren't finding any OPA. He didn't think they would be able to reduce numbers as fast if the spread of OPA between sheep through contact was as prevalent as first thought, although he wouldn't go as far as say there was none.

I think those that clearly have a serious problem with OPA are hiding behind the contact spread of the disease.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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