Pigs or Dogs?

I followed a bus through town the other day and on the back was a VIVA advert. The ad showed a picture of a Spaniel puppy and a piglet. The strapline read "Which is your favourite animal", then in much feinter print " to eat?"
Now ,obviously I think that the answer in the UK is pretty obvious, but I wonder whether that is as clear cut across the whole world. Do more people on the planet eat pigs, dogs or both?
 

thorpe

Member
I followed a bus through town the other day and on the back was a VIVA advert. The ad showed a picture of a Spaniel puppy and a piglet. The strapline read "Which is your favourite animal", then in much feinter print " to eat?"
Now ,obviously I think that the answer in the UK is pretty obvious, but I wonder whether that is as clear cut across the whole world. Do more people on the planet eat pigs, dogs or both?
i dont even want to think about that one!
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
I followed a bus through town the other day and on the back was a VIVA advert. The ad showed a picture of a Spaniel puppy and a piglet. The strapline read "Which is your favourite animal", then in much feinter print " to eat?"
Now ,obviously I think that the answer in the UK is pretty obvious, but I wonder whether that is as clear cut across the whole world. Do more people on the planet eat pigs, dogs or both?
Pigs. It's the No1 meat in East Asia.

But providing the correct welfare standards are met, I have no problem with people producing and eating dogs.
 

BAF

Member
Livestock Farmer
Let the world go to sh!t like it is doing and see how people's morals shift! I'm not saying you'll see Joey Carbstrong the vegan pr*ck eating a chihuahua kebab next week but if we ended up in a rationing situation or just a position where imported food is prohibitively expensive and the choice is starve or eat whats available, which isn't going to be tofu and avocados, and vegan ideal will be a long forgotten memory!
As long as its raised in the best possible way and killed humanely I've not got a problem with eating anything.
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
Let the world go to sh!t like it is doing and see how people's morals shift! I'm not saying you'll see Joey Carbstrong the vegan pr*ck eating a chihuahua kebab next week but if we ended up in a rationing situation or just a position where imported food is prohibitively expensive and the choice is starve or eat whats available, which isn't going to be tofu and avocados, and vegan ideal will be a long forgotten memory!
As long as its raised in the best possible way and killed humanely I've not got a problem with eating anything.

If the apocalypse comes I'm gonna be a cannibal specifically targeting vegans. They're the closest thing to a grass fed human.
 

BAF

Member
Livestock Farmer
If the apocalypse comes I'm gonna be a cannibal specifically targeting vegans. They're the closest thing to a grass fed human.
I wouldnt eat unprocessed vegans. They eat too much processed rubbish dressed up to pretend to be meat. Vegetarians on the other hand they're true herbivores. I feel like vegans would have to be made into cheap and nasty sausages. Lips, tits and eyelids sort of sausages.
 
I know that way more pigs than dogs are eaten. But East Asia is where most dogs are eaten? Aren't a third of the world's population Chinese?

Eating dogs is a lot less socially acceptable in Asia than it was. There is a rising trend in keeping pets in China these days, and a lot more stigma aimed at anyone who is offering 'pet' animals for sale as food. It's not something that happens in the mainstream parts of China any longer- they are much too affluent for that. Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand and the like are also hugely more affluent and prosperous than they were even 60 years ago.

 

Flatlander

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lorette Manitoba
Eating dogs is a lot less socially acceptable in Asia than it was. There is a rising trend in keeping pets in China these days, and a lot more stigma aimed at anyone who is offering 'pet' animals for sale as food. It's not something that happens in the mainstream parts of China any longer- they are much too affluent for that. Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand and the like are also hugely more affluent and prosperous than they were even 60 years ago.

The pet food store could become the new local butchers. Would cut down on stray dogs and feral cats. Couple of badgers and a fox or two for the more adventurous. Watched a program on airport security a while back and the biggest item trafficked thru heathrow was bush meat. Everything from dead monkeys to snake meat.
 
The pet food store could become the new local butchers. Would cut down on stray dogs and feral cats. Couple of badgers and a fox or two for the more adventurous. Watched a program on airport security a while back and the biggest item trafficked thru heathrow was bush meat. Everything from dead monkeys to snake meat.

Yes, for some reason smuggling bush meat is a hugely prevalent thing. I have no intention of ever eating monkey- I view this as being highly dubious given the prevalence of diseases in primates.
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
Yes, for some reason smuggling bush meat is a hugely prevalent thing. I have no intention of ever eating monkey- I view this as being highly dubious given the prevalence of diseases in primates.
It's where HIV originated isn't it?

Popularity of bushmeat is cultural. You can take the native out of Africa, but you can't take the Africa out of the native.
 
It's where HIV originated isn't it?

I don't actually know much about HIV. I presume it originated in the animal kingdom somewhere. I know of several very similar viruses that infect other kinds of animal. Cats, for example, get FIV. I presume there is a primate version of HIV which probably jumped the species barrier (maybe not really a barrier even in this case, more of a new paragraph) through blood contact, maybe through humans predating other primates.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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