Post Brexit Meat Export

Martin Holden

Member
Grassland Exhibitor
Location
Cheltenham
Of course the EU will look to their internal market first.

Just as the UK should.

By which I mean that UK beef producers/wholesalers should be looking at UK meat replacing imported eg Irish meat.

Lot's of publicity in the South West about fishermen struggling to export their catches, but no evidence that shops are stocking more UK fish.
Where’s the fishing industries promotion here at home to encourage us to eat more fish? Surely with some 60 odd million we could eat some fish that isn’t fried in batter!?
 

Martin Holden

Member
Grassland Exhibitor
Location
Cheltenham
We can go on debating this for yonks. Nothing much will change as of course the EU is not going to do anything to assist the UK business's. They absolutely don’t want anymore countries to follow the UK. While a remainer as I thought we could bring about change in the EU, I now think this was never going to happen, so we are where we are. Hopefully we will knuckle down and get on with all the necessary export hoops. Now if we do this and the EU start to move the goalposts, then there will be troubled times ahead for sure. While I liked free movement I don’t like losing more power and governance to Brussels, so maybe what has happened isn’t a bad thing. As others have said economically I can’t see how the current version of the EU can survive; and that isn’t the same thing as saying a common market isn’t a bad thing. It wasn’t when we joined but it has moved too far in the USA of Europe IMHO.
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
We can go on debating this for yonks. Nothing much will change as of course the EU is not going to do anything to assist the UK business's. They absolutely don’t want anymore countries to follow the UK. While a remainer as I thought we could bring about change in the EU, I now think this was never going to happen, so we are where we are. Hopefully we will knuckle down and get on with all the necessary export hoops. Now if we do this and the EU start to move the goalposts, then there will be troubled times ahead for sure. While I liked free movement I don’t like losing more power and governance to Brussels, so maybe what has happened isn’t a bad thing. As others have said economically I can’t see how the current version of the EU can survive; and that isn’t the same thing as saying a common market isn’t a bad thing. It wasn’t when we joined but it has moved too far in the USA of Europe IMHO.

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Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
I have to say 'WTF did people expect after we left the club?'

It's too early yet, and complicated by a pandemic, to say 'I told you so'. Things may get somewhat smoother for trade as the year goes on, but I am not going to hold my breath.

You just wait until people can go on holiday by the millions again. That's when things will come home to roost for the man and woman on the Clapham omnibus.
 

Ashtree

Member
Losers still moaning haven’t heard em shut up for 4 years
I fear a lot of “winners” who voted leave, are moaning the loudest now.
Take NI DUP MP’s, the most rabid of rabid leavers, even though their electorate are strong remainders. Have you seen them morning daily on TV?

Then there’s the fishermen. Voted leave. Now shafted by Boris. Moaning like a banshee.
I could go on .....
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
Things will sort themselves out once people except that this is the future and they need to get on with it. It's just a pi**ing match at the moment.
Import and export requirements change with other countries all the time. China's good at changing rules and not telling anyone until the products on the docks.
It will take time to build a system and fine tune it that's all.
Perhaps it will encourage people to export further afield?
Plenty of other countries out there that aren't in Europe.
 

Martin Holden

Member
Grassland Exhibitor
Location
Cheltenham
I have to say 'WTF did people expect after we left the club?'

It's too early yet, and complicated by a pandemic, to say 'I told you so'. Things may get somewhat smoother for trade as the year goes on, but I am not going to hold my breath.

You just wait until people can go on holiday by the millions again. That's when things will come home to roost for the man and woman on the Clapham omnibus.
Yup, seriously for a moment it’s far too early. By July we will have a better picture from which to judge “good or bad”. As you say when Jo public goes on holiday especially by car that’s when some fun could start.
 

roscoe erf

Member
Livestock Farmer
I fear a lot of “winners” who voted leave, are moaning the loudest now.
Take NI DUP MP’s, the most rabid of rabid leavers, even though their electorate are strong remainders. Have you seen them morning daily on TV?

Then there’s the fishermen. Voted leave. Now shafted by Boris. Moaning like a banshee.
I could go on .....
Farmers fisherman and remainers the perfect storm for moaning what did you expect and only weeks in
 
We can go on debating this for yonks. Nothing much will change as of course the EU is not going to do anything to assist the UK business's. They absolutely don’t want anymore countries to follow the UK. While a remainer as I thought we could bring about change in the EU, I now think this was never going to happen, so we are where we are. Hopefully we will knuckle down and get on with all the necessary export hoops. Now if we do this and the EU start to move the goalposts, then there will be troubled times ahead for sure. While I liked free movement I don’t like losing more power and governance to Brussels, so maybe what has happened isn’t a bad thing. As others have said economically I can’t see how the current version of the EU can survive; and that isn’t the same thing as saying a common market isn’t a bad thing. It wasn’t when we joined but it has moved too far in the USA of Europe IMHO.
OK people.Jack and Jill time?

The Single Market is like castle. With a moat. Within it and signed up to the SM it is as easy to run cargo and people from Mablethorpe to Marseilles, or Madrid.
But the decision by Theresa May to leave that SM, put up the drawbridge leaving GB outside the castle and in the position of a ‘third country’.
Rules applying to imports from a third country are not spite or personal towards us. We chose ( or our Berluddy politicians chose) to adopt that position.
The EU cannot discriminate between ‘third countries’. No special rules for GB / UK.
So the exporters have to get a grip on this, stop whinging and read the rules applying to Third Country imports into the SM. Especially SPS products which need veterinary inspections at Border Inspection Posts. As farmers, our products.

* SPS is Sanitary and Phyto sanitary products. Or meat, meat products and plant products to you and me.
 

TheTallGuy

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
OK people.Jack and Jill time?

The Single Market is like castle. With a moat. Within it and signed up to the SM it is as easy to run cargo and people from Mablethorpe to Marseilles, or Madrid.
But the decision by Theresa May to leave that SM, put up the drawbridge leaving GB outside the castle and in the position of a ‘third country’.
Rules applying to imports from a third country are not spite or personal towards us. We chose ( or our Berluddy politicians chose) to adopt that position.
The EU cannot discriminate between ‘third countries’. No special rules for GB / UK.
So the exporters have to get a grip on this, stop whinging and read the rules applying to Third Country imports into the SM. Especially SPS products which need veterinary inspections at Border Inspection Posts. As farmers, our products.

* SPS is Sanitary and Phyto sanitary products. Or meat, meat products and plant products to you and me.
And despite moans to the contrary... 3rd country status & what that entails has been known about for a long time!
 
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