Proper Lime

Slag could be reasonable value to you in Wales because I would imagine the haulage cost isn’t too bad coming from Port Talbot. And it has some other goodies in it too, but it’s not particularly good at raising pH

But I’ve no idea why anyone would want to haul Limex right the way across the widest part of the U.K.

That idea can’t stack up at all.
 

adda

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
mid wales
Problem was with Limex is haulage it's such a distance away , even more so now the way costs have gone , it works well mind but don't think it will last like Cotswold Lime , not sure what to say about Slag
A neighbour had some limex 3 weeks ago about £25 ton he thought it was as his boy that was in charge of it near Builth Wells
 
Location
Ceredigion
Slag could be reasonable value to you in Wales because I would imagine the haulage cost isn’t too bad coming from Port Talbot. And it has some other goodies in it too, but it’s not particularly good at raising pH

But I’ve no idea why anyone would want to haul Limex right the way across the widest part of the U.K.

That idea can’t stack up at all.
My mate hauls tons of it to Puffin Spuds in Pembroke so thought I would give it a try , I've tested tons of stuff over the years , but gone back to the Cotswolds stuff , it works and maintain s the pH better than anything else I've used , like you say slag don't lift the pH enough , it's cheap mind
 
Location
Ceredigion
What is its NV?
IMG_20220530_140552.jpg
 
Does it ever break down ,
The lime job need sorting out , is there not a lime association that polices this , declaration sheet means nothing if you get a load of grit , why don't quarries invest in a grinder and do a proper job instead if loading what's fallen off the belts in many cases
Sorry a lot of why's there but makes me angry the waste of it all
Because grinding machines cost alot and as the older ones break, they dont replace them.

Local to me they didnt because it would add £3 a ton to the cost - despite being a softer rock than the quarry 2 miles up the road - it would make their lime £8 a ton... next door selling 5mm down at £4 a ton to shift it - no point as farmers just went to the cheap quarry - so they matched their product for £6 - and still claim its a loss maker, they do it to shift the fines that pile up on the screeners.

I do alot of groundworks outside of farming - and Have seen Ag lime being spread over piles of 6"down to get rid of it a couple of 10 tonne scoops over a 200 ton pile, as long as it doesn't push the 6" outside of 6F2 spec - rock fines are a problem for many softer and brittle rock quarries.


Its the same reason yellow building sand is becoming restricted nationwide - many quarries are not grinding it as even at 25 a tonne its just not worth the investment to produce a consistent 1mm-down product when the demand is so high for a 5mm down grit at £20 a tonne.
 

CPF

Member
Arable Farmer
Cab-over Pete

I see your long lost cousin was spreading very good quality lime today near Melbourne .🤣
If you zoom into the photo you will see Melbourne, 22 miles away from where I took the photo.
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That’s exactly why you need to see a spec sheet if you’re buying a product you don’t know.

It could be, quite literally, a pile of waste.
Interestingly I got a scoop of lime slurry for free last week, its drying out under cover now - Its from a limestone quarry that washes their 20mm and 10mm aggregates for the concreting market, so all the fines are removed and the dust is all water borne so typically 0.65mm down, infact it feels like talc when dry and clay when wet, as its the water suspended fraction.
Its normally landfilled as its a bright white sticky clay - I asked why they done sell it as a premium Lime and they said its the weeks it takes to dry and when dry its so fine it covers everything in dust in a slight breeze.

Now that would be some amazing lime.
 
Interestingly I got a scoop of lime slurry for free last week, its drying out under cover now - Its from a limestone quarry that washes their 20mm and 10mm aggregates for the concreting market, so all the fines are removed and the dust is all water borne so typically 0.65mm down, infact it feels like talc when dry and clay when wet, as its the water suspended fraction.
Its normally landfilled as its a bright white sticky clay - I asked why they done sell it as a premium Lime and they said its the weeks it takes to dry and when dry its so fine it covers everything in dust in a slight breeze.

Now that would be some amazing lime.
Spread it with a tanker with sand stirrer in👌
Don't forget my cut if it works🤣
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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