Putting a seed boot on a 1inch pigtail leg.

Discussion in 'Direct Drilling Machinery' started by Wigeon, Nov 30, 2018.

  1. Wigeon

    Wigeon Member

    Does anyone know if such a thing is available?

    I seem to recall someone referring to an instance where this had been done, with a sort of spreader plate at the bottom, to go behind a sweep share and produce a nice mat of plants, not rows.

    I know it's not minimising disturbance, but it could be a cunning plan for a wet spring into subsoiled ground. No press wheel to bung up, and a single row of straight harrow tines to cover it all over. Massive seed rate, then if it looks a bit thick use the same thing as a weeder to create rows.

    Madness?
     
  2. Fish

    Fish Member

    Location:
    North yorkshire
    Is it not called a Claydon :sneaky:
     
    juke, mo!, Wombat and 1 other person like this.
  3. Wigeon

    Wigeon Member

    Funny you should mention it, but the frame of the old blench pigtail just happens to be yellow! Pure coincidence I'm sure.

    I was going to call it the amazing pig-till turbo grower, or some such catchy title. It'll solve all your farming problems!

    Seriously though, might they fit?
     
  4. Fish

    Fish Member

    Location:
    North yorkshire
    I think you can get some to fit one inch pigtails, but getting them to run at a consistent depth will be a challenge.
    Bourgault will do some, look at martinlishman.com.
     
    Wigeon likes this.
  5. tw15

    tw15 Member

    Location:
    DORSET
    On our old willrich drill it was using bourgault seed boots in the late 80,s they have been around for years nothing new comes out of claydons all he has done is combined a leading tine with a seeding tine .
    Straw harrows been around for years in the states the terrastar well sampo made them in the eighties .
    Got to give it to Jeoff he is very good at his job and makes some good kit .
    All they need is a disc dd drill as the next step to compliment the line up or a drill that you can change tool bars on quickly .
     
    Brisel likes this.
  6. clbarclay

    clbarclay Member

    Location:
    Worcestershire
    I am using Bourgault points and seed boots on my tine drill, which started out life as a pig tail cultivator. I still have 7" sweeps and spreader seed boots from when it was conceived as a min till cultivator drill, but now I just used the narrow 3/4" knife openers on it for everything.

    The drill using full width sweeps with spreader plates behind them was based on much heftier stubble cultivator legs, like the cultivator in the link bellow. I have enough trouble with the 1" pigtails breaking while direct drilling with the narrow points.
    http://www.zetepa.cz/produkty-radlickove-podmitace-detail-9

    Aside from breaking tines, my other issue with the tine drill has been covering the seed. Trying to put the small amount of tilth back over slots that are a small % of the working width is a challenge for any following harrow. High disturbance sweeps should at least make that easier.
     
    Wigeon likes this.
  7. britt

    britt Member

    Location:
    leics/warks border
    If you have a 3 row pigtail just seed with the first 2 rows and set the tines so that the back row closes the slot from the side.
    I can't think where I get that idea from :scratchhead:;).
     
    Wigeon and Shutesy like this.
  8. Shutesy

    Shutesy Moderator

    Location:
    Stansted
    And stick a really cool name on the side like ... Tri (three rows of legs) ton (weighs about a ton), think I'm gonna go get it patented tomorrow! :rolleyes: :ROFLMAO:
     
    Wigeon and juke like this.
  9. Wigeon

    Wigeon Member

    Can't think what you're on about, but this little beauty I'm cooking up will not only enable you to drill your spring oats into soup-like clay but will make you more attractive to anyone who happens to be passing. Other men will want to be you, and ladies will want to hear you talk about establishment techniques.

    Either that or it'll return rapidly to the nettles from whence it came.

    Or even remain in the nettles unless my list of miraculously leaking again gutters decides to shorten itself.
     
    Shutesy likes this.

Share This Page