Re-directing cattle farming advice/views

baaa

Member
Hi to everyone, I'm based in Brittany, France. I farm sheep over here. I have a farming friend with a 400 acre farm, who has recently sold his Montbeliarde milking cows, after 30 years of milking on the farm. He is now looking to redivert his farm business whilst keeping cows and cattle as his focus. He has over 3000m2 of modern farm buildings.
I have agreed to help him find ideas for his next venture and I am coming here for your friendly advice and views :):giggle::giggle:. One thing that has struck me as interesting is that there is no TB in Brittany and/or France. The only TB testing that needs to be done is at the abattoir. There is no testing on the farm, so no risk of positive reactors. This could mean that farmers that have cultivated their bloodlines over many years, could safeguard them by boarding a selection at such a farm. Do you think there could be a demand for such a service for cattle farmers? He might also be interested in offering services, such as, AI, semen collection and embryo transfer if required, perhaps from French cattle breeds as well. Any helpful advice would be greatly appreciated:giggle::giggle:
 

Formatted

Member
Livestock Farmer
Moving cattle from areas of a high risk of TB infection to an area of low risk? What could possibly go wrong...
 

baaa

Member
Yes 🤗 I get your point, thank you for replying🤗. I"m assuming that measures would be taken to avoid such risks. He has quarantine facilities and no cows on the premises or nearby at the moment. I was wondering if breeders would use a facility like this to keep their valuble blood lines safe. In-house AI, semen collection and embryo transfer are options. I don't know if brexit has caused difficulties in sourcing european semen and embryos?
 

baaa

Member
Thank you for your reply.:D Yes we're heading for a ban on live exports for slaughter but I believe export and import for breeding stock will continue. It is interesting that you mention northern Scotland, I imagine there is less risk of TB there, but I don't know the statistics. I imagine there are cattle well-suited to the climate there and some that are not. My friend's land is suitable for year round turnout. His milking cows had the freedom to go in and out as they wanted in the winter. Thank you again for your reply 😁
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
Hi to everyone, I'm based in Brittany, France. I farm sheep over here. I have a farming friend with a 400 acre farm, who has recently sold his Montbeliarde milking cows, after 30 years of milking on the farm. He is now looking to redivert his farm business whilst keeping cows and cattle as his focus. He has over 3000m2 of modern farm buildings.
I have agreed to help him find ideas for his next venture and I am coming here for your friendly advice and views :):giggle::giggle:. One thing that has struck me as interesting is that there is no TB in Brittany and/or France. The only TB testing that needs to be done is at the abattoir. There is no testing on the farm, so no risk of positive reactors. This could mean that farmers that have cultivated their bloodlines over many years, could safeguard them by boarding a selection at such a farm. Do you think there could be a demand for such a service for cattle farmers? He might also be interested in offering services, such as, AI, semen collection and embryo transfer if required, perhaps from French cattle breeds as well. Any helpful advice would be greatly appreciated:giggle::giggle:
I'm in the Limousin and we're back to 2 year testing everything over 2 years old. Others are on Annual tests.
Read this...
And this...
 
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baaa

Member
I'm in the Limousin and we're back to 2 year testing everything over 2 years old. Others are on Annual tests.
Read this...QUOTE]

Thank you for replying. This is so interesting. There is a small amount of TB in other reigions, such as yours, but officially, France has been indemnified of TB since 2001. This means the occurence of the disease is less than 0.1% of cattle.

The online article below published on the French government site in March 2021 has been translated into English.


The translation reads:

Since 2001, France has been considered officially free from bovine tuberculosis by the European Union, despite the persistence of around one hundred outbreaks each year. In some regions, particularly New Aquitaine, there has been a steady increase since 2004.

To obtain officially free status, the annual prevalence of infected herds must be less than 0.1% for six years.
To maintain the status, the rate of officially free herds must be greater than 99.9% on December 31 of each year and the country must demonstrate good surveillance capacities while respecting European regulations on tuberculosis.

The incidence in the UK, by the way, as a whole is 9.4% and in Scotland 0.6%.
Brittany is a particularly TB free area, being 500miles from any cases for over 25 years. This is why I wanted to know if there might be an interest in a service to safeguard valuable cattle.
 

baaa

Member
At the moment cattle are selling good so taking into account haulage is there
room for profit for the next guy in France
That is a big consideration. I was wondering whether it would be something of interest to specialist breeders who have developed their bloodlines for many years and finally have what they want.
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
Hear what you say. Same with CJD / BSE. Do they still have JCB disease in certain Departement from time to time?
JP, the reason that the incidence of ESB in France was so low was because 1 case saw the whole herd culled and no restocking for 12 months. My friend here had bought an expensive dairy heifer at a show, the breeder of this heifer had his whole herd culled and my friend had his whole herd of 55 taken out as well , just because that heifer had been in his here.
The UK government wanted to "save money" by not following this example. The UK Farmers , Beef and Dairy industry picked up the tab!
 

JP1

Member
Livestock Farmer
JP, the reason that the incidence of ESB in France was so low was because 1 case saw the whole here culled and no restocking for 12 months. My friend here had bought an expensive dairy heifer at a show, the breeder of this heifer had his whole here culled and my friend had his whole here or 55 taken out as well , just because that heifer had been in his here.
The UK government wanted to "save money" by not following this example. The UK Farmers , Beef and Dairy industry picked up the tab!
Hmmmm JCB disease may have also played a part I fancy - same with TB thus far
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
Hmmmm JCB disease may have also played a part I fancy - same with TB thus far
And what proof have you got that this is the case with tb.?
Don't forget , a tb reactor here sees the Chasse clear cull all wildlife susceptible in 3 km radius.
They took out a flock of sheep 20km. from here with tb reactors. How many sheep flocks are even tested in the uk? And maybe you should start testing them as well!
 

Cowmansam

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Shropshire
I’d have no problem with that aslong as all wildlife that carries it is took aswell the reason it’s such an issue here is because badgers where protected for so long combined with improper testing I saw vets just waving cattle past not bothering to test the wild ones before now
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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