Rear discharge spreader beaters

Monty

Member
Looks like a late 90's model. The rear shaft looks like it has been replaced at some point with a newer style shaft so sprockets will likely be replaced too. I would say £2-£3k for this one or £4-£5k for a tidy one. Check for play in the gearboxes and how thick the steel is. If it's very thin then walk away and look for a tidier one preferably with the single piece gearbox. We have a 2001 model like this and the 3 single gearboxes are poorly designed and a complete PIA to strip to replace bearings and seals
 

Lazy Sod

Member
Location
Warminster
Something I forgot to mention about the spteaders that we had in the 50s and 60s was that in weather such as we are experienced at the moment the bedchain would freeze to the bed. Can that be a problem today with rear discharge spreaders?

Did not some manufacturer make a spreader where the manure was pushed back to the beaters hydraulicly?
 

DrDunc

Member
Location
Dunsyre
Something I forgot to mention about the spteaders that we had in the 50s and 60s was that in weather such as we are experienced at the moment the bedchain would freeze to the bed. Can that be a problem today with rear discharge spreaders?

Did not some manufacturer make a spreader where the manure was pushed back to the beaters hydraulicly?
Yes, I have one, a Marshall vantage


IMG_468111249487924.jpeg



The pusher door freezes if it's been used for slurry or hen shyte and it gets below minus 15 😭
 

puntabrava

Member
Location
Wiltshire
We have a 2001 model like this and the 3 single gearboxes are poorly designed and a complete PIA to strip to replace bearings and seals
Those boxes would do a hell of a lot of work before problems but I wouldn’t be bothering changing seals and bearings in a box that used to cost a few hundred quid.
 

Monty

Member
Those boxes would do a hell of a lot of work before problems but I wouldn’t be bothering changing seals and bearings in a box that used to cost a few hundred quid.
We replaced the 2 beater gearboxes in ours 5 years ago with new and one side went again last autumn. I think it's the sloppy muck we spread running down through the seals and into the bearings that killed it. So I stripped and replaced the bearings with a much heavier duty one at the top plus fitted a grease nipple to each to grease these top bearings. New gearboxes were around £500 each 5 years ago, new bearings and seals £30ish. The rotors have massive bearings at the top but 2 small puny ones in the gearbox which take most of the load and run dry due to sitting in the top of the gearbox. It wouldn't be so bad if the bearings could be replaced easily but these boxes were designed by a sadist.
 
Looks like a late 90's model. The rear shaft looks like it has been replaced at some point with a newer style shaft so sprockets will likely be replaced too. I would say £2-£3k for this one or £4-£5k for a tidy one. Check for play in the gearboxes and how thick the steel is. If it's very thin then walk away and look for a tidier one preferably with the single piece gearbox. We have a 2001 model like this and the 3 single gearboxes are poorly designed and a complete PIA to strip to replace bearings and seals
Rolland used a 3 part design from memory and I remember taking 'one' to bits and it was a PITA as well.

I see Bunning now use a far more serious looking thing under the beaters of their machines these days.
 

Lofty1984

Member
Location
Cardiff
Something I forgot to mention about the spteaders that we had in the 50s and 60s was that in weather such as we are experienced at the moment the bedchain would freeze to the bed. Can that be a problem today with rear discharge spreaders?

Did not some manufacturer make a spreader where the manure was pushed back to the beaters hydraulicly?
Yep I’ve had the door freeze shut and only yesterday bed chain moved fine didn’t even think of the beaters filled her up put it to go and they were frozen solid even a nudge with a loader wouldn’t shift them so had to resort to the hottest setting on the jet wash to unfreeze them
 

DrDunc

Member
Location
Dunsyre
Yep I’ve had the door freeze shut and only yesterday bed chain moved fine didn’t even think of the beaters filled her up put it to go and they were frozen solid even a nudge with a loader wouldn’t shift them so had to resort to the hottest setting on the jet wash to unfreeze them
You're showing off. Pressure washer wasn't frozen solid too? 🥴

Admittedly I've resorted to some diesel and a couple of paper bags in a similar situation

Top tip..... Change the PTO shaft shear bolt BEFORE lighting the fire
 

Lofty1984

Member
Location
Cardiff
You're showing off. Pressure washer wasn't frozen solid too? 🥴

Admittedly I've resorted to some diesel and a couple of paper bags in a similar situation

Top tip..... Change the PTO shaft shear bolt BEFORE lighting the fire
Yes I struck lucky there with it not being frozen too 😂 thank god for slip clutches on the pto 🙈
 

JET

Member
I was in exactly the same situation. Looking endlessly for a tidy cheap one
travelled miles to look at some. In the end i came to the conclusion old chain rear discharge spreaders were nothing but trouble.
Especially for the 4k mark
So decided on a marshall. No chains just totally basic machine that would run for a whole week when it suited me

I was very lucky one came up on facebook not very far, so off i went and did the deal

Beaters were the things to look at. If they are thin they have obviously worked a lot. The one i got was nearly mint on the beaters but had started so show some rust

shot blasted and painted her up myself[/QUOTE]
 

Attachments

Hilly

Member
Only in UK machines, the pioneers, Samson would be using high grade steel to maintain working profile.
I used to hire two Samson’s they were greatspreaders, once had a third on the job a Richard western 😂 it just got In the way of the Samson’s junk In Comparison . The Samson’s were hire spreaders and in awfull bad condition but never broke completely 😂 they took some abuse .
 

ColinV6

Member
I used to hire two Samson’s they were greatspreaders, once had a third on the job a Richard western 😂 it just got In the way of the Samson’s junk In Comparison . The Samson’s were hire spreaders and in awfull bad condition but never broke completely 😂 they took some abuse .
How so? Undoubtedly the Samson is a different price bracket but if the 3 spreaders are the same size, and spec. There shouldn’t be much of a difference, certainly not to “get in the way” as you put it.
 

Hilly

Member
How so? Undoubtedly the Samson is a different price bracket but if the 3 spreaders are the same size, and spec. There shouldn’t be much of a difference, certainly not to “get in the way” as you put it.
Because the Richard western was shorter and slower to fill the old red samasons were low sides and long and very light weigh the threee were running on fiat 100 90’s and they could handle the Samson’s no problem but the western was to heavy empty ! Just a donkey of a thing , them old Samson’s were great tools could go on steep with them lower lighter everything .
 

ColinV6

Member
Because the Richard western was shorter and slower to fill the old red samasons were low sides and long and very light weigh the threee were running on fiat 100 90’s and they could handle the Samson’s no problem but the western was to heavy empty ! Just a donkey of a thing , them old Samson’s were great tools could go on steep with them lower lighter everything .
Suprised at that. Ours is spot on, feels very well made and spreads absolutely lovely. I’ve a bit more HP and weight on the front of it mind you. Would happily have another in the future.

5307D19C-AD69-40C3-999C-33DD22650CFF.jpeg


This was mixed yard muck last week on stubble. 10/10 for consistency and neatness of spread I think. :)
 
How so? Undoubtedly the Samson is a different price bracket but if the 3 spreaders are the same size, and spec. There shouldn’t be much of a difference, certainly not to “get in the way” as you put it.

I believe Samson spreaders are made almost entirely or largely out of high tensile steel. Also their beaters and chains and the like are a different design. I don't know how much more they are than a Richard Western.

I know Richard Westerns are popular but I would prefer a Bunning over one if it was me.
 

Hilly

Member
I believe Samson spreaders are made almost entirely or largely out of high tensile steel. Also their beaters and chains and the like are a different design. I don't know how much more they are than a Richard Western.

I know Richard Westerns are popular but I would prefer a Bunning over one if it was me.
The westerns are just as strong as a Samson but twice the bloody weight , back in the day with 100hp tractors the difference was very very noticeable they could handle the light weight of the Samson’s but the donkey weight and height of western made them useless on anything but flat land the old 100 90s with tb turbos were on the max with Samson’s .
 

ColinV6

Member
The westerns are just as strong as a Samson but twice the bloody weight , back in the day with 100hp tractors the difference was very very noticeable they could handle the light weight of the Samson’s but the donkey weight and height of western made them useless on anything but flat land the old 100 90s with tb turbos were on the max with Samson’s .
So when you call the Western “Junk” it’s purely based on lack of grunt up front, and nothing to do with the spreaders themself;)
 

Hilly

Member
So when you call the Western “Junk” it’s purely based on lack of grunt up front, and nothing to do with the spreaders themself;)
Well not really , it just was not as good in any shape or form like I say in comparison it was junk probably spread 1/4 of what a Samson did it wouldn’t spread lighter straw y stuff either if I remember just bridged , better than rotor spreader but not a patch on Samson . It was sold at a local collective for under 3k I didn’t even bid wouldn’t want to own it .
 

Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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