Red clover

Kevtherev

Member
Location
Welshpool Powys
Interesting as looking into options for upping protein for the dairy cows in the pit silage. Not feeling the love over on the lupin thread. how often can you cut red clover? If you grow it on its own, would layering it in the pit with alternate loads of grass work ok, as we box grass in and have that option To alternate fields. Or does it really need that grass growing in with it?
If thinking of growing it as a straight maybe worth looking at Lucerne instead ?
 
What's the soil borne problem with red clover? Is it nematode build up?

Are these more persistant varieties left down for 3-4 years or more going to cause more of a problem?
 
Location
Ceredigion
I’m not an expert on silage analysis, but i’d have been hoping for higher protein. Some good silage, but maybe not rocket fuel, would that be a fair assessment ?
CP will fall away Rapidly once in Flowers . 1st cut 1st year it needs to flower to help it establish but after that cut with small amount of flower visible, thus the importance of choosing the right companion grass so you hit them both at the correct growth stage
Dont cut earlier than 6 weeks apart ,6 to 8 weeks is ideal , and don't cut after early October
 
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Location
Ceredigion
Just don't feed it to ewe's that you are trying to get in to lamb....
And you open a can off worms . Some will say its only a mating that counts and others will argue its the ragwort effect . Builds up over time then hits you . But they all seem to agree the effect is worse in conserved forage . The good thing is it only effects breeding ewes , rams lambs and cattle unaffected
 
CP will fall away Rapidly once in Flowers . 1st cut 1st year it needs to flower to help it establish but after that cut with small amount of flower visible, thus the importance of choosing the right companion grass so you hit them both at the correct growth stage
Dont cut earlier than 6 weeks apart ,6 to 8 weeks is ideal , and don't cut after early October
Always cut late afternoon, and never let a tedder get anywhere near it, if turning is required then slowly with Acrobat.
Bale when the leaf is dry but green. If the leaf goes black and shatters, you've fcùked it.
20210107_144956.jpg
 
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And you open a can off worms . Some will say its only a mating that counts and others will argue its the ragwort effect . Builds up over time then hits you . But they all seem to agree the effect is worse in conserved forage . The good thing is it only effects breeding ewes , rams lambs and cattle unaffected
No ragwort here!!! That said the previous owners 30 years ago would have won a gold medal if it was an Olympic event!!!
 

sheepdogtrail

Member
Livestock Farmer
A great ley when mixed with ryegrass, festuloliums and cocksfoot but it is not as drought resistant as I expected. When cut twice and grazed in the autumn we find 3 years to be the limit. Overall very good though and we have put more down and keep experimenting with mixes.View attachment 943382View attachment 943386View attachment 943388
Nice ley there. That is what it takes to get that extra 200 grams of growth a day on lambs. Congrats to you. The pup is also keen. It also looks a little sour because it has to use his eye more in that field. That is ok, it will learn to appreach it when it needs a sugar fix.
 
Interesting as looking into options for upping protein for the dairy cows in the pit silage. Not feeling the love over on the lupin thread. how often can you cut red clover? If you grow it on its own, would layering it in the pit with alternate loads of grass work ok, as we box grass in and have that option To alternate fields. Or does it really need that grass growing in with it?
you will get 3 cuts if not 4
don't cut clover sward low, leave a 3 inch stubble
alternating loads should work
 
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Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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