Reduced N in no till

And here about the Australian results from Kirkby & Kierkegaard: SOM and nutrients


 

Simon C

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Essex Coast
And here about the Australian results from Kirkby & Kierkegaard: SOM and nutrients


Thank you Soren, very interesting. I have always thought our system is actually very nitrogen hungry. We need more, not less.
 

martian

DD Moderator
BASE UK Member
Location
N Herts
Yes, very interesting. It would be even more interesting to get a longer perspective on the results. I suspect that once you've got your top layer biologically active and well balanced, then it eats the residue/straw quite happily. The long-term no-tillers in the States say that they have trouble keeping the ground covered unless they have a very heavy Carbon rich straw/haulm from the previous crop. They cut their fertiliser rates too.
 

Simon C

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Essex Coast
Yes, very interesting. It would be even more interesting to get a longer perspective on the results. I suspect that once you've got your top layer biologically active and well balanced, then it eats the residue/straw quite happily. The long-term no-tillers in the States say that they have trouble keeping the ground covered unless they have a very heavy Carbon rich straw/haulm from the previous crop. They cut their fertiliser rates too.
Americans, Australians, most continental types love permanent cover to protect from extremes of weather which we don't get in our maritime climate. What ever you do, straw or residue is going to rot down, but to turn it into stable organic matter you need nitrogen to balance the C:N ratio. 1 atom of N for every 10 of carbon, and that N has to come from somewhere however biologically active your soil is. Without the N, all 10 Cs will disappear as CO2 into the atmosphere.

I am doing trials this year on wheat from no nitrogen all the way up to 250 kg N because I need to know, and put actual figures on what the fertiliser is doing for us. I would also love to know what it is doing to the OM levels, but there is no way of measuring it accurately across the whole field on a year by year basis.
 

CastleM

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Southern Ireland
Are there many farmers including a carbon source with their applied nitrogen? I've heard many speakers say this is essential to prevent the N "burning up" soil carbon. Liquid fertiliser much easier than solid to get carbon into.

I'm interested to try it this year but can find very little information on what source to use and how much. And what will stay in solution without causing sprayer blockages.

We have dropped applied N by 5% for 2 years in a row now on all crops. Hoping to keep on that path. Some no till but still using some cultivation in transition depending on rotation and soil type.
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Are there many farmers including a carbon source with their applied nitrogen? I've heard many speakers say this is essential to prevent the N "burning up" soil carbon. Liquid fertiliser much easier than solid to get carbon into.

I'm interested to try it this year but can find very little information on what source to use and how much. And what will stay in solution without causing sprayer blockages.

We have dropped applied N by 5% for 2 years in a row now on all crops. Hoping to keep on that path. Some no till but still using some cultivation in transition depending on rotation and soil type.
Some liquid N users have included molasses.
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
If you did a grain test and it showed too much N would you be tempted to cut down the N application the following year?

Would this be a fair guide?
You wouldn't be growing the same crop again next year & leaching will vary with the winter. That's a "conventional farmer's" answer.

Can't you do this with Brix/sap testers to nurture the plant as you go along?
 
You wouldn't be growing the same crop again next year & leaching will vary with the winter. That's a "conventional farmer's" answer.

Can't you do this with Brix/sap testers to nurture the plant as you go along?
Sorry I meant if you felt you were consistently oversupplying N to your wheat crop evidenced by grain analysis would you cut down in the future? Presuming most people apply the same amount to most fields
 
RegenBen did a fascinating podcast recently with John Kempf. He hinted at recommending to one of his clients that they should lower a field rate of N from 300 to 20. He didnt elaborate on the background. Is Ben on here?
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

  • 52
  • 0
Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
Top