Refuse to pay your TV licence fee - UK Agriculture Fight back

milkloss

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
East Sussex
Clive - does Enteric Fermentation not just mean livestock rumination?
Erm, ya. Clive might want to review that tweet:

Wikipedia—
Enteric fermentation is a digestive process by which carbohydrates are broken down by microorganisms into simple molecules for absorption into the bloodstream of an animal. Because of our agricultural reliance in many parts of the world on animals which digest by enteric fermentation, it is one of the factors in increased methane emissions.
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
Erm, ya. Clive might want to review that tweet:

Wikipedia—
Enteric fermentation is a digestive process by which carbohydrates are broken down by microorganisms into simple molecules for absorption into the bloodstream of an animal. Because of our agricultural reliance in many parts of the world on animals which digest by enteric fermentation, it is one of the factors in increased methane emissions.
i'm not sure it makes rice production and fosil fuels......... or even termites less of an issue

my point being why on earth is everyone focusing on livestock and not eating meat as some sort of simple answer to fixing climate change ? its not just not that simple and as I've pointed out in other tweets, eating is NOT optional, flying, driving and "iphone consumerism" etc are
 
Last edited:

bobk

Member
Location
stafford
I've said this before, the BBC is a bloated, inept and heavily biased organisation and I resent paying for their dross. I view anyone taking their shilling as being highly suspect. You lot all think Adam Henson is some kind of messiah: I can't watch the bilge and if you ask me the entire UK ag industry should refuse to cooperate with the BBC in any way. Work with their competitors, ITV or Channel 4 but avoid the BBC like the plague. Don't return their calls, don't agree to feature on their programs, don't take part in interviews. They agenda is firmly set against the industry.

The TV licence fee should be scrapped and the BBC should offer a monthly or yearly subscription service and scramble their bilge- I wouldn't watch it no matter how cheap the fee was and the days of programmed TV are long gone.
I;d go further , if it wasn't for the bbc , brexit would be done now .
 
No if it was not for democracy, Brexit would be done.
Thankfully we have a long held democratic system where parliament usurps kings , queens, and demagogues .

I think you mean MPs place themselves above the ordinary voter.

Unfortunately for your stand point Brexit was handed over to the electorate to decide BY MPs, who couldn't and wouldn't take responsibility.

I'd also point out that most adults have superior mental faculties, character & judgement than MPs such as Corbyn, Diane Abbot, Emily Thornberry, David Lammy and I'm sure there are many, many others - not just limited to the Labour Party either.

I doubt most adults would equate "Democracy" with the whimsical opinions of out of touch MPs .. we've left the 1800s well behind IMHO.
 

delilah

Member
A question for anyone who thinks UK ag would be better served by commercial media:
Do you think that the money behind Eat Lancet will refrain from reminding producers of the connection between editorial content and advertising revenue ?
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
I think you mean MPs place themselves above the ordinary voter.

Unfortunately for your stand point Brexit was handed over to the electorate to decide BY MPs, who couldn't and wouldn't take responsibility.

I'd also point out that most adults have superior mental faculties, character & judgement than MPs such as Corbyn, Diane Abbot, Emily Thornberry, David Lammy and I'm sure there are many, many others - not just limited to the Labour Party either.

I doubt most adults would equate "Democracy" with the whimsical opinions of out of touch MPs .. we've left the 1800s well behind IMHO.
No , you , me and the whole country vote for MPs. You may not like the result, but that is how it is.
Parliamentary laws say that no parliament is bound by the decision of the last. So TM discarded the referendum vote to history, by going for a general election.
Imwould also suggest that your intellect would struggle against most of those you mention :):)
 

milkloss

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
East Sussex
No , you , me and the whole country vote for MPs. You may not like the result, but that is how it is.
Parliamentary laws say that no parliament is bound by the decision of the last. So TM discarded the referendum vote to history, by going for a general election.
Imwould also suggest that your intellect would struggle against most of those you mention :):)
Is that really true: Because Teresa May called a general election the Brexit referendum is null and void? Could be fun if true!
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
Is that really true: Because Teresa May called a general election the Brexit referendum is null and void? Could be fun if true!
All referenda under UK law are actually only advisory, they have no legally binding effect on the government of the day, even
No governments are bound by a previous law , nor can they they bind a future.
It is quite scary when you look at the future.
The future labour government took a stand when they promised to keep to the spending pledges of the chancellor in the Major government . This was very unusual.
 

Oldmacdonald

Member
Location
Scotland
i'm not sure it makes rice production and fosil fuels......... or even termites less of an issue

my point being why on earth is everyone focusing on livestock and not eating meat as some sort of simple answer to fixing climate change ? its not just not that simple and as I've pointed out in other tweets, eating is NOT optional, flying, driving and "iphone consumerism" etc are
It doesn't, but it suggests you believe livestock production is much less.of an issue than it is.
 

JP1

Moderator
I've said this before, the BBC is a bloated, inept and heavily biased organisation and I resent paying for their dross. I view anyone taking their shilling as being highly suspect. You lot all think Adam Henson is some kind of messiah: I can't watch the bilge and if you ask me the entire UK ag industry should refuse to cooperate with the BBC in any way. Work with their competitors, ITV or Channel 4 but avoid the BBC like the plague. Don't return their calls, don't agree to feature on their programs, don't take part in interviews. They agenda is firmly set against the industry.

The TV licence fee should be scrapped and the BBC should offer a monthly or yearly subscription service and scramble their bilge- I wouldn't watch it no matter how cheap the fee was and the days of programmed TV are long gone.
What like The Farming Life on BBC2?
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
i'm not sure it makes rice production and fosil fuels......... or even termites less of an issue

my point being why on earth is everyone focusing on livestock and not eating meat as some sort of simple answer to fixing climate change ? its not just not that simple and as I've pointed out in other tweets, eating is NOT optional, flying, driving and "iphone consumerism" etc are
Its just the latest, trending thing in the media at the moment, they seemed to have moved on from plastic bags and burning coal.
Whenever there is a story written on it, it does well with views and clicks so more stories are written until the popularity of the topic goes down, then its on to the next thing.
As I write this there's 6 threads on the first page of Agricultural Matters, talking about the environment or the public/media views of it. So its good for TFF traffic too.
 
No , you , me and the whole country vote for MPs. You may not like the result, but that is how it is.
Parliamentary laws say that no parliament is bound by the decision of the last. So TM discarded the referendum vote to history, by going for a general election.
Imwould also suggest that your intellect would struggle against most of those you mention :):)
On the other hand both labour and conservatives stood on a manifesto of delivering Brexit, not that there’s anything new in political parties not delivering on their manifesto pledges.
 

arcobob

Member
Location
Norfolk
All referenda under UK law are actually only advisory, they have no legally binding effect on the government of the day, even
No governments are bound by a previous law , nor can they they bind a future.
It is quite scary when you look at the future.
The future labour government took a stand when they promised to keep to the spending pledges of the chancellor in the Major government . This was very unusual.
You are quite correct regarding the referendum but I am not sure that no government is bound by previous law. That would lead to a form of anarchy after every general election. Don`t laws have to be both passed and repealed in a similar process albeit in reverse ? Do European laws come into this category?
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
You are quite correct regarding the referendum but I am not sure that no government is bound by previous law. That would lead to a form of anarchy after every general election. Don`t laws have to be both passed and repealed in a similar process albeit in reverse ? Do European laws come into this category?
For a government to change previous law, it has to go through the full process , if it is in the manifesto the Lords cannot totally block it.
As I understand all Wuropean Law has to be incorporated into UK law by parliament and can be reversed, by the same process. Of course some of these laws were passed as they were agreed by treaty with Europe and repealing them would put us in defiance of signed treaties.
Not all European law that we have incorporated , is covered by treaty, far from it. Also very frequently we have passed laws which go far beyond what was required , so called gold plating.
I am not sure about the Human Rights legislation , which probably put us in this mess , due to its incompatibility with Common law. We certainly had an opt out, negotiated when we joined as it was one a of the basic requirements.
I cannot see parliament being in any hurry to remove any of the last 40. Years of legislation when we leave though
 

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Creamy, untreated and in a glass bottle: Britain gets a taste for old-fashioned milk

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Creamy, untreated and in a glass bottle: Britain gets a taste for old-fashioned milk

Written by Freya Herring

Dairy farmers cash in on a growing trend to replace both homogenisation and plastic with a revival of the traditional ways
“When the milk price crashed five years ago, we were in a bad...
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