Regional words, terms and phrases.

Big Mr C

Member
We used to have a guy from Sunderland that (worked) showed up every day, and he would say" clarks and clods" for mud and sparrows were "spuggies" if memory serves me correct.
 

Agrivator

Member
Still used widely in East Yorkshire barns is Norse for children
Larking is an east york’s word for playing ‘can I lark?’
‘Is Tom allowed out to lark?’

Further West in Yorkshire, ''lark'' becomes ''lake''.

Or it could be spelt ''laik'', because there's no definitive spelling for regional dialect words.

But on second thoughts:

''Larking'' is playing the fool, or larking about. ''Laiking'' is seriously playing, as in football or darts or quoits.
 
I can remember my grandfather talking about yarbs, not sure if it means young men (definitely not the word yobs), can anyone from Hereford tell me?
 

DrWazzock

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Bing - The place normally with walls on three sides where you store a heap of beet or grain. I think father brought the term down from Scotland along with a few others.
Shuck - ditch or watercourse
Grape - fork
Pinch - bar with pointed end used for making holes to start off bashing stakes into the ground
Mell - hammer for knocking fence stakes in, sometimes called a mall down south.
Peely wally - dizzy, woozy, faint
Tumbrel - cattle feed trough
Sticky Willy - cleavers (the weed)
Biniccles - Ragwort
 

Ts 59

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Isle of Man
A start in ploughing is a bye, a finish is a clash and short runs are pothigs. The channel in middle of cow house is a Gribber ,cleaned out with a grep , pulled off the cart with a grep thane into pollags ready fer spreading. We have sallies here too, and scutch grass. Ragwort are cushags .Cow chains go round" the dog" , the stack yard is called a haggart, the yard between farm house an outbuildings known as the street, a sack round your neck for sowing "manure" (artificial fertiliser) is a brat. If I get the tractor bellied out It would be "stuck in to the crothagg" . All in use here with the older generation.
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
'Wan' means 'one'....... in Devonshire dialect.

A start in ploughing is a bye, a finish is a clash and short runs are pothigs. The channel in middle of cow house is a Gribber ,cleaned out with a grep , pulled off the cart with a grep thane into pollags ready fer spreading. We have sallies here too, and scutch grass. Ragwort are cushags .Cow chains go round" the dog" , the stack yard is called a haggart, the yard between farm house an outbuildings known as the street, a sack round your neck for sowing "manure" (artificial fertiliser) is a brat. If I get the tractor bellied out It would be "stuck in to the crothagg" . All in use here with the older generation.
not much used here any longer,it was disappearing fast 40yrs ago or so even.and since as the older generation has departed:(
 

DrWazzock

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
A few Lincolnshire words and sayings

Neither good wool nor arselocks - A variation on "nowt nor summat".
Dackering - as in an engine misfiring, struggling or stalling.
Kebbing - heavy breathing of an animal with pneomonia or exhaustion.
Sheep trottles - Sheep dung.
Squad - mud, with the "a" pronounced as an "a" not an "o".
Slap - clean, as in broke the gate slap in two.
Mawk - maggot. He went as white as a mawk.
Gathman - the man who does the gathing. (feeds and beds the cattle). Are you doing the gathing over the weekend?
Now then - hello. Always amuses the non native Mrs when I'm on the phone.

Its always nice to fall into a bit of local dialect with a true local but they are getting rarer nowadays.
 

Sharpy

Member
Livestock Farmer
Bing - The place normally with walls on three sides where you store a heap of beet or grain. I think father brought the term down from Scotland along with a few others.
Shuck - ditch or watercourse
Grape - fork
Pinch - bar with pointed end used for making holes to start off bashing stakes into the ground
Mell - hammer for knocking fence stakes in, sometimes called a mall down south.
Peely wally - dizzy, woozy, faint
Tumbrel - cattle feed trough
Sticky Willy - cleavers (the weed)
Biniccles - Ragwort
A bing is a pile of stuff, so you could say "thats some bing of bales etc", you also get pit bings which are the huge piles of waste coal.
Ragwort round here is Benweed.
If a thing needs fiddled with you "fouter with it".
If something isn't square or level its skelly.
Couch grass is quikens.
A sickle is a hyuck.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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