Renovation or new build

Farmhouse is needing a bit of work. New roof, windows and probably strip the lath and plaster off and stud and insulate. Can be very cold.
Or knock down and build a new timber frame.
Comfort and warmth in my mind comes before architectural features and looks.
Has anyone done this or has opinions.
Thanks
 

spin cycle

Member
Location
north norfolk
got the same.....no way do you knock it down.....even if planners let you

for starters ,if you demolish, you've got planning fees....service disconnection/reconnection......building inspectors etc
 
You need to consider what spec you are going to renovate to insulation wise etc. The thing to remember with renovating a property is there is a lot of money spent taking apart to begin with and then prepping to start going back together which could be a fair amount towards a new build. That's without thinking about getting vat back on new build.
 
got the same.....no way do you knock it down.....even if planners let you

for starters ,if you demolish, you've got planning fees....service disconnection/reconnection......building inspectors etc

But can claim vat back....

I’ve done a lot of both, new build every time.

You will end up with the right floor spaces and a warmer future proof house. Once you are out of the ground you are only really at the mercy of the suppliers and trades but not the weather. You will always be against the unexpected when you renovate.

We keep bits of the old like Fire places and beams, and Refit into new. Might be able to salvage doors etc too.

If it’s a rickety old house the ‘character’ will soon wear thin as you uncover problems not allowed for.
 

BrianV

Member
Livestock Farmer
Farmhouse is needing a bit of work. New roof, windows and probably strip the lath and plaster off and stud and insulate. Can be very cold.
Or knock down and build a new timber frame.
Comfort and warmth in my mind comes before architectural features and looks.
Has anyone done this or has opinions.
Thanks
Something that might be worth considering is VAT I believe if it's a new build VAT is recoverable where as on complete renovations it is not, worth finding out & checking before starting.
 
Parents built a new retirement bungalow and are always warm. We burn 5 times the diesel and never that warm. I'm sure house as is ,is worth. £200 000 but would take alot to leave right but would it ever be as warm?
And in the back of my head the thought of paying someone to dig a hole and bury £200000 (old house) is hard to get over
 

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
Renovated mine. Complete strip, full rewire, studded and insulated all outside walls, new stairs, made bigger bathroom by reducing a bedroom but still plenty big enough, knocked a wall down and made big kitchen diner, big patio doors etc.
It has made a lovely house and couldn't be happier with it. Absolutely no regrets about renovating rather than knocking down.
 

devonbeef

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Devon UK
Renovated mine. Complete strip, full rewire, studded and insulated all outside walls, new stairs, made bigger bathroom by reducing a bedroom but still plenty big enough, knocked a wall down and made big kitchen diner, big patio doors etc.
It has made a lovely house and couldn't be happier with it. Absolutely no regrets about renovating rather than knocking down.
Do you have any damp problems with insulating the outside walls, I also get so fed up living in such a cold house gets worse as you get older.Was wondering if outside insulation might be the way, thanks
 

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
Do you have any damp problems with insulating the outside walls, I also get so fed up living in such a cold house gets worse as you get older.Was wondering if outside insulation might be the way, thanks
Not had any yet and there were definitely problems before. The house is warm and that is the whole house not just the living room and kitchen. The house has been in the family for decades and it was never warm before, or at best went cold as soon as the fire went out.
The stud and insulation was all on the inside of the wall so made the room smaller but not enough to notice. It does mean re-plastering of course so not a simple task if you are living in there while the work is done. I was lived in a static caravan for a couple of years during the work.
 

mo!

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
York
Renovation will always be a compromise.

I know several people who have told me, "I wish we'd knocked it down and started afresh, it would have cost less and made a better job." Nothing to stop you using old bricks and beams etc on a new build.

Make sure you fit MVHR and under floor heating. Game changer.
 
As we are now thinking more about climate change, knocking down and rebuilding new is far worse I think for the environment (Cement which has a very high carbon cost as opposed to lime mortar) plus, the character of an old house can not be replaced. I would always opt for renovate instead of rebuild with a new house.
 

Bald n Grumpy

Member
Livestock Farmer
New house. Sell the old one, build new and stay warm.
Would love to do that here, sell of old house and buildings and build a new comfy house. One thing stands in the way, how do you get planning for it as we've been advised it's nearly impossible even if we accepted an agricultural tie on the new house?
A gold star for anyone that comes up with the right answer
 
Would love to do that here, sell of old house and buildings and build a new comfy house. One thing stands in the way, how do you get planning for it as we've been advised it's nearly impossible even if we accepted an agricultural tie on the new house?
A gold star for anyone that comes up with the right answer
A new house without losing the old one is nigh on impossible in the countryside unless you have something to trade for it. Could you get a Class Q permission on a barn you don't use and then see if you can trade that for a house of a similar size but in a more appropriate location. This has been proven in Case Law and could be an option but you would lose a barn and possibly your Permitted Development rights (although some councils do slip up).

Farmhouse is needing a bit of work. New roof, windows and probably strip the lath and plaster off and stud and insulate. Can be very cold.
Or knock down and build a new timber frame.
Comfort and warmth in my mind comes before architectural features and looks.
Has anyone done this or has opinions.
Thanks
A new build would be better at meeting EPC figures and giving you the layout you want reather than trying to work with what you have but you would need to go through the whole planning process. There are ways to get a much larger house if you play your cards right and secure all the Permitted Development extensions on the existing house then you could use that as an arguement to get more in the new build - done that several times.
 

BBE

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
I'd say it comes down to how important "character" is to you. I've just done up a barn and am very happy with it, insulated and spec'd same as new build but keeps some character. However, it would definitely have been cheaper to do a new build!
 

Latest Poll on TFF

  • Yes

    Votes: 22 15.1%
  • No

    Votes: 124 84.9%

JCB launches Fastrac ‘iCon’

  • 143
  • 0
Written by Charlotte Cunningham from CPM Magazine

JCB has launched new Fastrac 4000 and 8000 Series tractors with an all-new electronics infrastructure which is claimed to deliver higher levels of performance. According to JCB, the new Fastrac iCon operator environment has three key features: iConfigure – creating a bespoke control experience for every operator iConnect – integrating advanced precision agriculture technology iControl – redefining operation through new driveline software The 175hp to 348hp (133kW to 260kW) Fastracs feature the new iCon armrest console and touch-screen display to provide flexibility in operator allocation and operator information, as well as a new transmission control strategy to enhance operator comfort and powertrain efficiency, says the manufacturer...
Top