Reporting Rural Crime

I can not emphasise enough, the need to report any and all rural crime - first to the police (and Environment Agency/local council for waste crime/fly-tipping), but also any organisation which you are a member of, be it the NFU, the CLA, CA, etc..

I fully appreciate how futile it too often is, when you make the call, and nothing happens. But for things to change, the scale of the problem needs to be fully understood and recognised, the facts and figures need to be there. Doing nothing, achieves nothing, but doing something will make changes happen in the medium/long-term.

At the very least, for the next generation to come.

I have mentioned elsewhere on this forum, local and national government work almost exclusively in facts and figures. And to successfully lobby for change, we need to be armed with accurate information which fully highlights the sheer scale of the problem.

This has not been happening. If we want positive change, then we need to change our habits - otherwise it will just be the same-old, same-old. And the government, and police leaders will carry on in ignorant bliss.

Don't just take my word for it, take a listen here at this podcast,

Link: My Name Is... - Richard - BBC Sounds (sign-in required, or one minute registration required).

At 22 minutes 45 seconds, Sir Mike Penning (MP for Hemel Hempstead and former Police and Justice Minister) is asked about funding for police and priority of rural crime, and he replies that it never "sat in my in-tray", because it was not sufficiently reported.

This is backed up at 24 minutes 10 seconds, by Julia Mulligan (a farmers daughter, former North Yorkshire Police & Crime Commissioner and former chairman of the National Rural Crime Network) who also highlights that rural crime is not being accurately recorded.

It is a frustratingly long game, but if you want things to change, then do your bit and report rural crime so the government is finally awakened to the severity of the issue.
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
Unfortunately, what you are suggesting is called "Complaining" and in some parts of the country that is considered very unsociable and a nuisance. I will go so far as to add that whistle blowers can be discriminated against because it is sometimes the very people who apply these laws, rules, and regulations who benefit from manipulating them. But I do agree with what you are saying. More well publicised high level prosecutions would do a lot of good!
 

JP1

Member
Livestock Farmer
I can not emphasise enough, the need to report any and all rural crime - first to the police (and Environment Agency/local council for waste crime/fly-tipping), but also any organisation which you are a member of, be it the NFU, the CLA, CA, etc..

I fully appreciate how futile it too often is, when you make the call, and nothing happens. But for things to change, the scale of the problem needs to be fully understood and recognised, the facts and figures need to be there. Doing nothing, achieves nothing, but doing something will make changes happen in the medium/long-term.

At the very least, for the next generation to come.

I have mentioned elsewhere on this forum, local and national government work almost exclusively in facts and figures. And to successfully lobby for change, we need to be armed with accurate information which fully highlights the sheer scale of the problem.

This has not been happening. If we want positive change, then we need to change our habits - otherwise it will just be the same-old, same-old. And the government, and police leaders will carry on in ignorant bliss.

Don't just take my word for it, take a listen here at this podcast,

Link: My Name Is... - Richard - BBC Sounds (sign-in required, or one minute registration required).

At 22 minutes 45 seconds, Sir Mike Penning (MP for Hemel Hempstead and former Police and Justice Minister) is asked about funding for police and priority of rural crime, and he replies that it never "sat in my in-tray", because it was not sufficiently reported.

This is backed up at 24 minutes 10 seconds, by Julia Mulligan (a farmers daughter, former North Yorkshire Police & Crime Commissioner and former chairman of the National Rural Crime Network) who also highlights that rural crime is not being accurately recorded.

It is a frustratingly long game, but if you want things to change, then do your bit and report rural crime so the government is finally awakened to the severity of the issue.
Police in this County now sporting "Rural Officer" stickers on their cars - maybe just an initiative from the P&CC to assuage the howls from the local on the annual % uplift for the police precept

The UK's getting ever more urban, the magnitute and scale of urban crime and violence means we'll never get recognition as , frankly, it isn't proportionate

You've also got Civilian / any call handlers who fail to recognise the seriousness of some calls; sheep rustling, sheep worrying, loose livestock near main roads
 
Unfortunately, what you are suggesting is called "Complaining" and in some parts of the country that is considered very unsociable and a nuisance. I will go so far as to add that whistle blowers can be discriminated against because it is sometimes the very people who apply these laws, rules, and regulations who benefit from manipulating them. But I do agree with what you are saying. More well publicised high level prosecutions would do a lot of good!

Reporting a crime:
  1. 999 - for a crime in progress
  2. 101 - to report a rural crime incident
Is not complaining, and is what you need to do to get the issue raised, and get a crime number. Hopefully you get a response for 999 "crime in progress", but that is never guaranteed unfortunately.

Either way, to get an as accurate as possible reading of the issues and statistics you need to report.

The incidents should also be referred to any organisation which you belong to, who should collate all the information and lobby collectively on behalf of farmers and the rural community for positive change.
 
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Police in this County now sporting "Rural Officer" stickers on their cars - maybe just an initiative from the P&CC to assuage the howls from the local on the annual % uplift for the police precept

The UK's getting ever more urban, the magnitute and scale of urban crime and violence means we'll never get recognition as , frankly, it isn't proportionate

You've also got Civilian / any call handlers who fail to recognise the seriousness of some calls; sheep rustling, sheep worrying, loose livestock near main roads

There has been a directive from "on high" for the past few years, for the different constabularies to have a policy and plan to manage rural crime, so yes, the stickers are likely to be a P&CC initiative.

Resources need to be allocated proportionally, but without the police and government understanding the magnitude, then rural crime will always drop off the radar. To raise the profile, we need to raise the stats, and that can only be achieved through accurate reporting.

And yes, call handlers (and other areas of law enforcement) do need a lot of education regarding the impact of rural crime. Again, this is relative, and what may not be serious in an urban environment has significant consequences for the rural community and rural businesses.

We can't have a defeatist attitude; that allows the issue to be repeatedly brushed under the carpet.

A simple call to 999 (crime in progress) or 101 (if an incident has already occurred) and get the crime number, which is then recorded on police stats. And referring rural crime incidents to NFU, CLA, etc. allows them to use those figures to lobby government (who drive initiatives and funding to the relevant areas).
 
I'm sure that most of you are more than aware, but I want to spell it out for those that are not familiar with the affect of not reporting rural crime.

When central government is allocating budgets to the different departments and each department sub-divides their budget to their different areas of responsibility, and it is then further sub-divided and allocated as is felt appropriate based on their remit, in this case the different police constabularies around the country, the sums are put together based on several factors - all revolving around facts and figures to ensure the tax-payers money is spent as logically, efficiently and fair for everyone concerned as much as possible (based on those facts and figures).

If the police are not officially aware of the severity of rural crime, because it has not been reported, then in turn the police will not report the correct crime stats up to central government when they go cap in hand to the government for more cash.

For example:

If there are 100 actual crimes in one year in a constabularies jurisdiction, 70% reported in urban areas, and 30% taking place in rural areas; but only 10% of rural crime is reported - then that is 20% under-reported. And 20% not funded for the following year in the total budget. To break the example down further, that equals 67% of rural crime not reported and 67% not funded for in subsequent years.

Rural Crime Stats 1.jpg
Rural Crime Stats 2.jpg


And we wonder why the problem is getting worse? When we are not reporting, and rural crime is a faint blip on the governments radar, and our funding goes elsewhere.

Not reporting rural crime is counter-productive, and we're shooting ourselves in the foot.

By including organisations such as the NFU and CLA, they can also raise awareness and lobby government (armed with the correct facts and figures), to bring about positive change.

This will not change over-night. You may not get an actual response to reporting crime, but you should get a crime number - and those numbers all add up for future funding. And eventually, there will be enough bobbies with police cars, to turn up.
 

Gone Shooting

Member
Location
hereford
Friends had a large house turned into a cannabis factory - without going into the the long and short Herefordshire police took 0ver 22 hours to send a useless pratt around who refused to go in on his own as he had a bad back and by the time the muppets went back the people who were still in the house had gone !!!!!!! The owners wife was on her own and seriously worried for her safety in all this time living close by - have a friend who works for Hereford police and confirms that the chief officer doesnt take rural crime seriously at all . We had a watsap group and dedicated rural crimes officer but was shut down. Fellow friend and member of the forum had his truck pinched by a local thieving git whos nicked diggers, quadbikes and hardcore poacher - the keys were in his pocket when police paid a visit ! In court for 3 offences banged to rights but the case was still thrown out ! So not having a pop at you but its a waste of bloody time - the only thing that will happen is someones going to get hurt badly as the barstewards know they are teflon.
 
I feel your pain and frustration, but if you are concerned and motivated enough then you should keep doing what is right. I'm more than aware that some police officers do not provide a service to the same standard as others, and that should never be the case.

When service that is lacking, both the Police and Crime Commissioner and your MP should be informed - using factual (not emotive) information, and also passed on to NFU, CLA, etc., so that they too can add pressure (especially when there is a pile of cases mounting up). Ensure that you get feedback on what action will be taken and by what deadline; and then follow up around that deadline to make sure that something has been done. If you send off your concern and do nothing ("fire and forget") then it will be forgotten, and fall by the wayside.

Why was the WhatsApp group shutdown? This does not need a police officer to be involved, but is a tool to be used by the community/neighbours. Has anyone followed up to find out where the rural police officer is?

If you don't care, lack motivation and do nothing, then what is going to be the police's attitude? Irrespective of whether it is right or wrong, they will simply take the easy option - as individuals and more especially as an organisation. Their priority will be focused elsewhere because the perception is, the rural community are not bothered enough to allocate resources.

Some police forces are making good progress in tackling rural crime, others are being left far behind - but it needs farmers and the rural community to report crime and raise the profile of the issue, so there is little choice but to deal with it.
 
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Gone Shooting

Member
Location
hereford
The officer in question was very good and loved her job - she was made to work 9-5 by her boss which is a complete waste of time - i suggested a meeting with the rest of the group with the police but zero interest so i left the group. May try again with some friends later on in the year - will keep an eye on the scrote in question in the meantime. Thanks for the reply- i am 64 now and will continue to enjoy shooting , fishing , golf and burning rubber with proper engines and telling idiots to get off my land - i feel sorry for the generations coming through with the mamby pamby state that will ensue - if ive upset anyone with these comments please note i dont give a sh--t !
 
The officer in question was very good and loved her job - she was made to work 9-5 by her boss which is a complete waste of time - i suggested a meeting with the rest of the group with the police but zero interest so i left the group. May try again with some friends later on in the year - will keep an eye on the scrote in question in the meantime. Thanks for the reply- i am 64 now and will continue to enjoy shooting , fishing , golf and burning rubber with proper engines and telling idiots to get off my land - i feel sorry for the generations coming through with the mamby pamby state that will ensue - if ive upset anyone with these comments please note i dont give a sh--t !

... but zero interest

That is the issue. If there is zero interest from the community, there will be zero interest from the police.

Motivation and drive is essential. Discard those wasting time/not interested/time wasters, and only deal with serious people that share the same concerns.

if ive upset anyone with these comments please note i dont give a sh--t !

:LOL: :ROFLMAO::LOL::ROFLMAO:

Only way to be, "say what you mean and mean what say".
 
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Building the evidence base
Defra has a team dedicated to developing the evidence base on rural areas. It regularly publishes the Statistical Digest for Rural England to provide up-to-date analysis across a wide range of subjects, including demographics, enterprise and investment, transport and accessibility, education, health, and crime.

Link: Rural Proofing Report 2020 (publishing.service.gov.uk)

Link: Statistical Digest of Rural England - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) (page 167)

The important point here, recorded crime, which requires crime to be reported.
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
I was brought up to believe if we didn't complaint those in charge wouldn't know what wasn't working and they wouldn't be able to put it right. There are occasional posts on this forum complaining about this and that but really they ought to be directed to those responsible. And, yes, I am as guilty as anyone. So complaining is going to upset some people? Maybe they need to be upset!
 
Any links to parallel organisations in Scotland (and Wales)?

Not as detailed, or specific, but some quick links are...

Scottish Crime and Justice Survey 2019/20, link: Scottish Crime and Justice Survey 2019/20 - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

SPARC Rural Crime Update, link: SPARC rural crime update – Safer Communities Scotland

Scottish Countryside Alliance Rural Crime Survey 2020, link: Scotland-rural-crime-survey-October-2020.pdf (countryside-alliance.org)


Other Media (Scotland)

SPARC Rural Crime Strategy 2019-2022, link: SPARC Strategy.pdf (scottishlandandestates.co.uk)

Rural Watch Scotland, link: Rural Watch Scotland :: Home

NFU Scotland, link: NFU Scotland | /rural-crime.aspx

Scottish Farmer "Help keep Scotland beautiful and speak up about rural crime", link: Help keep Scotland beautiful and speak up about rural crime | The Scottish Farmer
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
Not as detailed, or specific, but some quick links are...

Scottish Crime and Justice Survey 2019/20, link: Scottish Crime and Justice Survey 2019/20 - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

SPARC Rural Crime Update, link: SPARC rural crime update – Safer Communities Scotland

Scottish Countryside Alliance Rural Crime Survey 2020, link: Scotland-rural-crime-survey-October-2020.pdf (countryside-alliance.org)


Other Media (Scotland)

SPARC Rural Crime Strategy 2019-2022, link: SPARC Strategy.pdf (scottishlandandestates.co.uk)

Rural Watch Scotland, link: Rural Watch Scotland :: Home

NFU Scotland, link: NFU Scotland | /rural-crime.aspx

Scottish Farmer "Help keep Scotland beautiful and speak up about rural crime", link: Help keep Scotland beautiful and speak up about rural crime | The Scottish Farmer

Excellent! Thank you for that.

I have had problems accessing law reports to find the facts rather than what I've been told and what "they" want us to believe. But our national libraries should have a copy of every item that's been published and librarians are trained to help us find them. There's nothing like having the right weapons if you need to get into a fight!
 

bottletopbill

Member
Location
Kent/Surrey
Farmers could work with shooters to help protect there land and machinery as so many shooters drive around the country side at all hours and could report there suspicions.
Working together we could cut rural crime down and stop fly tipping. I live in Kent/Surrey and shoot and respect the land .
Police Farmers and Shooters need to have a meeting and exchange contact numbers to stop this.
 

Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

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Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

Written by Lisa Applin

Webp.net-resizeimage-3.jpg


In July, we opened the applications window for farmers to join our Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is 1 of the 3 new environmental land management schemes. It sits alongside the future Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes.

Through the Sustainable Farming Incentive, farmers will be paid for environmentally sustainable actions – ones that are simple to do and do not require previous agri-environment scheme experience.

We are piloting the scheme to...
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