Retained afterbirth, pull, leave or cut off? Graphic picture warning

I would give it a pull yourself. A slight force should pull it out. If not then you can get the vet.

Speaking from experience, 1st time it happened me the vet just pulled it out!!

Make sure and inject with antibiotic too
 

Angus77

Member
Location
N.Ireland
find they normally come away @ 8-9 days with a gentle pull, vets have told me not to worry about them for 10 days. Use gloves! and apply some pressure, if not moving forget about it til next day, normally will pass intact and a young fit cow should rid herself of any residue within a short time without the need for AB's.
 

Agrivator

Member
It's very public spirited not to use antibiotics for a retained placenta in order to reduce the risk of world-wide antibiotic resistance, even if in the face of the cow possibly dying and a financial loss of £1000?
 

Cowcalf

Member
It's very public spirited not to use antibiotics for a retained placenta in order to reduce the risk of world-wide antibiotic resistance, even if in the face of the cow possibly dying and a financial loss of £1000?
as I understand in the early days of cleansing hanging ir requires the bugs to work to help the release of cleansing by breaking down the attached areas, antibiotics work against this action, fine to use AB if cow looking off colour
 

Agrivator

Member
as I understand in the early days of cleansing hanging ir requires the bugs to work to help the release of cleansing by breaking down the attached areas, antibiotics work against this action, fine to use AB if cow looking off colour
Thankyou for that. Every day's a school day. Another gem to remember.
 

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
find they normally come away @ 8-9 days with a gentle pull, vets have told me not to worry about them for 10 days. Use gloves! and apply some pressure, if not moving forget about it til next day, normally will pass intact and a young fit cow should rid herself of any residue within a short time without the need for AB's.
4 days from calving before you try to clean a cow, I do it myself, wear two gloves as it seems to get through, a good vet will unbutton it in less days than that though but its a job to find one that would know such stuff these days.
used to use pessaries but I don't think the vets bother now they give ab's instead
 

Dry Rot

Member
I know next to nothing about cattle but with mares we (or the vet) would give a shot of oxytocin. I always make sure I have some on hand when I am expecting a mare to foal. The oxytocin will bring on cleansing quite quickly (in horses).

But I have also called the vet out, one was the late Professor 'Mac' Johnston, former senior lecturer at the RVC, who was manually removing the cleansing while I nervously held the head of a pony notorious for rearing. All the time, "Mac" was giving me a private lecture on obesity in native ponies (with one arm up the pony's arse). He only charged £30 for the call out too! (The new lot are at the other end of the scale). A retained cleansing can be serious in horses, don't know about cattle but I think it is less serious...but why take chances?
 

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Innovation and tech in action at Cereals LIVE

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Innovation and tech in action at Cereals LIVE


There is nothing quite like seeing tech in action to understand how it works and how it can be beneficial on farm, which is why Cereals LIVE will be putting demos right at growers’ fingertips.

From state-of-the-art robotics, to autonomous tractors and electronic weeding, Cereals LIVE will have it all available in video demonstrations in the brand new Innovation and Tech Demo ring, says event director, Alli McEntyre. “It’s a brave new world for farming, with innovation driving sustainability and efficiency. Being able to see the most cutting-edge technology in action will give farmers an insight into where their businesses could be headed very soon.”

So what will growers be...
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