S barley

Happy

Member
Location
Scotland
Depends just how good it is and how much N it’s had.
Unless very strong I’d say no. Crops will be shorter than usual and roots will be way down seeking moisture in this drought.

Last year was first in 25 of growing it that I have applied growth reg to barley. Only ever get flat bits on double sown/fertilised bits.
 

Chae1

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
Depends just how good it is and how much N it’s had.
Unless very strong I’d say no. Crops will be shorter than usual and roots will be way down seeking moisture in this drought.

Last year was first in 25 of growing it that I have applied growth reg to barley. Only ever get flat bits on double sown/fertilised bits.
Lucky you. I've had whole fields go down. That's using pgr.

How many units of N do you normally give it?
 
If it has 4 or 5 tillers per plant and higher seed rate will early drilling and rain makr the n available
consider it

in 2013 I had barley drilled 28 April after rape no aplied pre drilling drill at high seed rate on the deck
picked it up ok there was so much straw it could not brackle
 

DaveGrohl

Member
Location
Cumbria
Depends just how good it is and how much N it’s had.
Unless very strong I’d say no. Crops will be shorter than usual and roots will be way down seeking moisture in this drought.

Last year was first in 25 of growing it that I have applied growth reg to barley. Only ever get flat bits on double sown/fertilised bits.
So why did you apply it last year?
 

Happy

Member
Location
Scotland
So why did you apply it last year?

Pretty much everyone had to last year. It was a one off.
Combination of thirteen months of very dry weather from April 2018 resulting in soils in their best ever condition.
Best ever seedbeds resulted followed by a kind spring with more residual N available, roots went way down in the dry spring extracting every last nutrient.
Then the rain came. Never seen such spectacular growth in SB as at this time last year.

Lucky you. I've had whole fields go down. That's using pgr.

How many units of N do you normally give it?

100-110 Units of N.

This was last years
3DCF3B6C-0470-46C0-B851-D68A14EE0366.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Chae1

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
Pretty much everyone had to last year. It was a one off.
Combination of thirteen months of very dry weather from April 2018 resulting in soils in their best ever condition.
Best ever seedbeds resulted followed by a kind spring with more residual N available, roots went way down in the dry spring extracting every last nutrient.
Then the rain came. Never seen such spectacular growth in SB as at this time last year.



100-110 Units of N.

You have been extremely lucky in my opinion. I seem to end up applying it every year. Apart from 2018 when it was so dry.

I'm only going for mid 90s unitwise for low N malting and still get problems.

We always seem to get thundery showers in July, which batters it down. I'd be quite happy if only small parts of fields went down, normally end up with acres flat.

Its probably muck mineralising and becoming available later in the season. I do count muck applied as ten units of total N though.

Probably over cautious now, I have the agronomist well warned it's got to stay standing as I don't want crap from combine driver, and square baler doesn't like wet lumps of straw from combine backing up.
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Midlands
Where are you @Billboy1 ? How thick are your crops?

I don't normally regulate spring barley unless they look thick and lush when approaching the T2 spray when I might put 0.5 Terpal in. If it doesn't rain in the next 3 weeks they won't need anything. The rows have met in most of my barley & there's 25cm between them so there's a fair chance I might put a sniff of something in later on. Barley doubles in height after the flag leaf has emerged so there's still time to do react if conditions change.
 
Location
Morayshire
I’ve never used it either. Only put 80 units of N on though as it’s all for malting. Does get a lot of dung too. Does go flat sometimes but never welded to the ground where you can’t pick it up.
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Midlands
I’ve never used it either. Only put 80 units of N on though as it’s all for malting. Does get a lot of dung too. Does go flat sometimes but never welded to the ground where you can’t pick it up.

That's not much N without knowing what the manure supplies. I do assume it's for distilling therefore a lower grain N wanted? The main market down here used to be export for continental lagers which want 1.85 N. I haven't spared the N this year as I think a fair bit will end up in the feed market.
 
Location
Morayshire
That's not much N without knowing what the manure supplies. I do assume it's for distilling therefore a lower grain N wanted? The main market down here used to be export for continental lagers which want 1.85 N. I haven't spared the N this year as I think a fair bit will end up in the feed market.
Yes all goes for whisky, has to be below 1.65n loads average about 1.55n so must be getting it right.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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