Scrambler motor bike as a Christmas present

Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton
Ooooo I remember my first bike..
Suzuki RM80, what a bike, loved it!
If the wife isn't too happy then go down the trials bike route., Slow, skillful sport. Far cheaper. And safer!
I started out with an 80cc trails bike.
Low centre of gravity ,plenty of low gears great fun to learn on.

Then moved up to a Suzuki RM100 with a power band.
This would do probably 60mph at least, rip your arms off on hard surface and only rule was me and lads next door had to go same way round field, no playing "chicken"!

Biggest down side, when I moved onto a road bike 50cc honda. The speed was such a let down couldn't wait to get a car!!

Learnt a bit about mechanics as well
 
I’d go for 80cc with big wheels is as opposed to 125 - some 125’s are lethal
Four stroke 125 are about the same size as a big wheel 85 two stroke but tamer. 125 two strokes are not much different power to an 85 but far bigger frame. Too big for a twelve year old unless he's a giant
 
Yes you don’t want a monster I had a yz 125 and it scared the bejesus out of me a big and heavy and a sod to kick over wheel 80 Honda was perfect for looking stock and getting about the farm on
 

Grassman

Member
Location
Derbyshire
The older classics are really making a lot of money nowadays. We have two in now that will of cost towards £8k to be in the condition they are now.
 

Grassman

Member
Location
Derbyshire
Any trials bike can be made into a more user friendly machine for general running about by fitting a seat unit as modern trials bikes don't have one as they are designed around the rider standing mainly.
 
The older classics are really making a lot of money nowadays. We have two in now that will of cost towards £8k to be in the condition they are now.
Honda stopped making two stroke motocross bikes in 2008 and now they're really in demand. I got my lad cr85 off eBay for£800,he had it two years until he outgrew it. Put new plastic for £70 and put it on Facebook for £1350 and had forty people after it within three hours. Should have asked more for it,it was gone cash in hand by dinnertime
 

Celt83

Member
Livestock Farmer
Trials bikes are available from £500 that will work in a fashion up to £10k for the latest high tech. Buy cheap and you buy trouble. You won't get anything decent under £1.5k really. Spend £3.5k and you get a relatively modern bike that would be good enough to win a trial in the right hands.
£1500 I could live with, I wouldn't want to be spending a lot more as its his first bike and prangs are bound to happen!

Trials bikes are where you go over rocks and obstacles? He had the idea of being a modern cowboy to go and round the cattle up, so I'm all for the idea! We live on a very flat plain so not sure if that would suit what he wants? Feel free to laugh as I have no idea what to buy!
 
Great advice Rob, cheers!

That's what I'm hoping, a good thing for a father and son outings. Something I yearned for from my old man. He plays rugby so I make time for taking him to practice /games, but I thought it would be good to tinker over engines, ferrings of an evening rather than him being glued on the xbox!

My wife has turned into a proper mama bear over the subject and isn't keen to say the least!
Well, point out to her that if he has a dirt bike now, it will (possibly) get bikes out of his system early on so he won't want a road bike later.... ;)

As other have said, helmet is vital, even for a tootle around a field. Gloves and boots are a must, albeit Trials boots are nicer for just scooting around than MX boots. Pick up a pair on eBay...
 

The Big Farming Survey deadline is fast approaching

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The 31 March deadline for responses to RABI’s Big Farming Survey is fast approaching and everyone linked to farming across England and Wales is being encouraged to take part.

“The support that we’ve received since the launch of The Big Farming Survey in January has been incredible. We’d like to thank everyone who has already completed the questionnaire or promoted the research project more widely,” says RABI’s Chief Executive, Alicia Chivers.

“However, the more comprehensive the data collected, the better the reflection on the daily realities of people from all sectors of agriculture and across all regions,” she adds. “We therefore want to hear from farmers, farm workers, contractors, spouses, adult-aged children and...
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