Secondhand Toyota Landcruiser buying.

Been looking at Landcruisers to replace a TD5 Disco who’s chassis is having to be welded up again. Swayed towards a 100 series 4.2 diesel owing to its higher 3.5 ton towing capacity, are these a good buy and is there anything to be careful of, mindful these are now approaching 20 years old?
 

Treemover

Member
Location
Offaly
I know lads that will only buy them, but if the engine gives bother; it is very costly and specialized. Like everything you pay your money and roll the dice.

Big heavy tank; not sure they are all that frugal.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
They were as economical as the indirect injection 3.0 in the Collorado [prado/90] and could pull the house down in comparisons when new. Times change though and a best of 24mpg, 200hp and 400Nm torque is no longer competitive.

Mine has been very reliable and only needed one front wing due to a bit of rust. Chassis as new but reat axle, shocks, brake pipes and now the rear floor is getting crusty, Very reliable up to a point.

Mine has been laid up because the brake servo failed. It costs a small fortune to replace. Its shocks, which are nitrogen accumulators on the chassis are also shot so it needs converting to mechanical suspension. Last time it was used everything else worked like new and even the full exhaust is original. It would require the above plus four new tyres, brake discs and possibly callipers plus two batteries to get it back on the road. At 23 years of age its a money pit I’m afraid.
 

Johnnyboxer

Member
Location
Yorkshire
They were as economical as the indirect injection 3.0 in the Collorado [prado/90] and could pull the house down in comparisons when new. Times change though and a best of 24mpg, 200hp and 400Nm torque is no longer competitive.

Mine has been very reliable and only needed one front wing due to a bit of rust. Chassis as new but reat axle, shocks, brake pipes and now the rear floor is getting crusty, Very reliable up to a point.

Mine has been laid up because the brake servo failed. It costs a small fortune to replace. Its shocks, which are nitrogen accumulators on the chassis are also shot so it needs converting to mechanical suspension. Last time it was used everything else worked like new and even the full exhaust is original. It would require the above plus four new tyres, brake discs and possibly callipers plus two batteries to get it back on the road. At 23 years of age its a money pit I’m afraid.

Best export yours to Africa then

Somebody will buy it
 

Johnnyboxer

Member
Location
Yorkshire
They want it for next to nothing. If the servo motor alone is £1500, then the engine and gearboxes and all the other parts must surely be worth £3k to someone. I’ve been offered a lot less.
As with everything, it's only worth what somebody is prepared to pay - if they can make use of it in another country (as it's currently not MOT'able in UK)................unless you intend to fix it, it's scrap to you - just cluttering up the place!

Stuff has moved on and not sure how desirable a 23 year old LandCruiser is.... with a knackered back axle and faulty brake servo, plus other oddments that are in need of replacement

Africa can make use of it, accept their offer and think of the difference between their offer and your '£3k aspirational value', as a gift or donation to some people less fortunate than yourself
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
As with everything, it's only worth what somebody is prepared to pay - if they can make use of it in another country (as it's currently not MOT'able in UK)................unless you intend to fix it, it's scrap to you - just cluttering up the place!

Stuff has moved on and not sure how desirable a 23 year old LandCruiser is.... with a knackered back axle and faulty brake servo, plus other oddments that are in need of replacement

Africa can make use of it, accept their offer and think of the difference between their offer and your '£3k aspirational value', as a gift or donation to some people less fortunate than yourself
The back axle is fine but very crusty compared to other metalwork, About what you'd expect for a 20 year old probably. A friend's 90 series which is a couple of years younger than my 100 has had a replacement axle about five years ago due to the case rusting through.

The point being that these things are really old now and if done up would be candidates to show at classic car shows.
 

Johnnyboxer

Member
Location
Yorkshire
The back axle is fine but very crusty compared to other metalwork, About what you'd expect for a 20 year old probably. A friend's 90 series which is a couple of years younger than my 100 has had a replacement axle about five years ago due to the case rusting through.

The point being that these things are really old now and if done up would be candidates to show at classic car shows.

Restore it then and put it in the parade ring

You might enjoy the restoration and showing it off
 
Thanks, That sounds reliable to my ears as a Landy owner. Bought new I’ve replaced front/rear diffs, head gasket, two sets of rear air springs, two fuel pumps, two watts linkages, all in 165k probably 1/3 of that towing with about 25mpg albeit still the original clutch. Might go and have a look at a 100 series Cruiser then once I’ve got a fresh ticket on mine, it’s either that or go back to another 110. The 4.2 sounds as if it’d pull a td5 backwards. They are all upwards of £7k so I guess they’re pretty well regarded. Problem with modern diesels is all of the emissions sensors, absolute nightmare for me as I do all my own repairs.
 

Timbo

Member
Location
Gods County
4.2 is very thirsty but will pull a house down,,check the rear chassis arches ,they rot out ,if its still on air suspension ,that can be an expensive fix .
I think @Cowabunga has or had one


The other gotcha is the ABS modulator / pump & accumulator which are only available through Toyota and replaced as complete unit, approx £1000. The accumulators loose their pressure slowly over time. Look for a ABS lamp on dash permanently on.
 
Thanks, That sounds reliable to my ears as a Landy owner. Bought new I’ve replaced front/rear diffs, head gasket, two sets of rear air springs, two fuel pumps, two watts linkages, all in 165k probably 1/3 of that towing with about 25mpg albeit still the original clutch. Might go and have a look at a 100 series Cruiser then once I’ve got a fresh ticket on mine, it’s either that or go back to another 110. The 4.2 sounds as if it’d pull a td5 backwards. They are all upwards of £7k so I guess they’re pretty well regarded. Problem with modern diesels is all of the emissions sensors, absolute nightmare for me as I do all my own repairs.
165k she’s only just run in
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
The other gotcha is the ABS modulator / pump & accumulator which are only available through Toyota and replaced as complete unit, approx £1000. The accumulators loose their pressure slowly over time. Look for a ABS lamp on dash permanently on.

The ABS unit and servo seem to be one unit fixed to the master cylinder. My problem initially was that the pump itself has worn out bearings and it makes a terrible noise and puts that ABS brake warning light on.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
It was a product of its time. Big body but limited internal space and payload capacity. Honestly you will get much higher power and torque and not far off double the fuel economy from a current Ford Ranger Wildtrak 2.0 with ten speed automatic. Almost as good a ride but better handling and about the same passenger room inside, plus you get the VAT back and tax relief. Yes its more expensive to buy but far cheaper to run and new with a warranty rather than 20 year of age. No secure luggage space in the pickup unless you get a canopy of course.

Yes, theLC 100 and the newer 200 are well past their sell-by date. Superb quality old dinosaurs.
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
Ni, it's a transit

This is it apparently
1620032363321.png
 

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