Secondhand Toyota Landcruiser buying.

Happy

Member
Location
Scotland
Probably not as rare as you think, they just dont come up for sale often as the owners know what they have and just run them forever, i know of several local to me, more manuals than autos actually, Same with the 80 series tbh, loads of manual ones around but rarely see one up for sale, usually an auto or a petrol. people dont hold on to the autos or petrols as much because of how bad on fuel they are compared to the diesel manuals. most of the 100s around here have had the AHC removed, which is a surprisingly easy job tbf
Know of a secondhand machinery dealer who will only buy manual Landcruiser as his vehicle. Does over 50K miles a year but says they are becoming harder and harder to find them in spec he wants with the manual box.
Think his last one was well over 400k miles when he got his current one with just 150k on the clock.
Those that have them definitely reluctant to give them up.
 
You have a problem mate! I have run the Land Cruiser from new to 200,000 miles, my second, and I've also ran three Range Rovers including two diesels. I made no mention of used values but agree that my 100 series is worth around £3000 as is. Hell my 2014 Ford Ranger is valued at over £10k and it isn't even a 3.2 or a Wildtrak. So what?

You have taken the fact that I've said that the current top of the range Ranger will outperform a 20 year old Land Cruiser as a personal insult. That is not normal by a very long way. Get a grip. Judging by your standard of punctuation, you may be of school age, I don't know, but try to stop acting like a spoilt brat that can't take that your pet car has been overtaken by newer engine and transmission technology.
Your the keyboard warrior !! judging by your standard of reading ,you just don't read other peoples posts properly, I have not taken it as a personal insult against my Truck, I do wonder if you would say these comments face to face, You are a Patronising Pratt, i will tell you this to your face if i ever have the misfortune to meet you
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Your the keyboard warrior !! judging by your standard of reading ,you just don't read other peoples posts properly, I have not taken it as a personal insult against my Truck, I do wonder if you would say these comments face to face, You are a Patronising Pratt, i will tell you this to your face if i ever have the misfortune to meet you
Except of course that it is down in black and white that you took it as an insult using the specific word ‘insult’ "
Specifically and I quote "its an insult to say a new Ford pick up is...." So who do you allege was insulted if not yourself?

I'm quite sure you would. You are obviously that type of person and claim to be so in print for all to witness. Be aware that I don't suffer fools gladly face to face either.
 
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Fendtbro

Member
MF5445 Tier3 is about the same power and has a Dyna4 transmission, the same rear tyres so would run rings around the MF1200 on most jobs. Even with the same four furrow reversible on the back.

I have a 100 series Land Cruiser on the yard and a Ford Ranger. I don't know how long the Ranger will last but I do know for sure the relative room in their cabs and having driven the LC for 200,000 miles I'm damned sure I know how it performs and its fuel consumption. The Ranger is of course part time 4wd on the road, which sometimes makes a difference but not so much these days with traction control and stability control. The twin turbo Ranger with 10 speed is in a different league when it comes to performance and towing. I don't own one of these though but have driven one enough to know for sure.

You seem to have a very unhealthy affinity to the Land Cruiser. Almost as if any criticism at all of it is a personal attack on you. "An insult"!
I advise you to get a grip and re-evaluate your priorities in life. It's just a machine and will end up as so much scrap like every other machine.
I know what your saying that the ranger will match the old landcruiser in performance but there is far more than that to total ownership benifits.. the rangers are generally unloved trucks just there to do a job, once old and rusty they are almost worthless and the opposite of iconic. The big landcruisers are Often static or rising in values for non rotten examples. Then there is the matter of off road potential, There is no comparison.. my 80 series with big tyres and lift and lockers could probably drive over a ranger!!
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
I know what your saying that the ranger will match the old landcruiser in performance but there is far more than that to total ownership benifits.. the rangers are generally unloved trucks just there to do a job, once old and rusty they are almost worthless and the opposite of iconic. The big landcruisers are Often static or rising in values for non rotten examples. Then there is the matter of off road potential, There is no comparison.. my 80 series with big tyres and lift and lockers could probably drive over a ranger!!
I agree but everything hits a bottom value at some point. There may also be a certain snob value for a significant proportion of owners of this kind of vehicle, which, with an irrational emotional involvement with their car may account for some of the aggressively defensive postures encountered when anything other than total praise is mentioned.

People do modify pickups with larger tyres, lifts and lockers also, so comparing a much modified vehicle with standard is not really relevant. In stock trim neither the pickup nor the LC are worth a damn on wet grassland slopes for instance, especially not the LC which is too heavy and whose tyres are too wide. Yes, of course you can modify both vehicles to make them more capable for the conditions.
I’ve no quibble with the LC being built to a higher quality standard. It did cost from £43,000 at launch of the 100 series in 1998, which was about four times the price of a Ranger back then. It was in a totally different league back in 1998, but time, tide, improving built quality and technology and engineering advances wait for no man. It is a vehicle of its time.

It’s replacement, the 200 series, never caught on or sold in the same way as the 100 series and despite the improvements it was out of date even when launched. It lost out big time to the JLR models in the UK. Where the 100 series could compete here up until the V8 diesel Range Rover was launched, the 200 just bombed. In other regions it sold fine with Toyota having a far superior dealer and backup network worldwide than JLR. Both the 150 and 200 LC are now less competitive against newer worldwide rivals from JLR and the US brands and are at the end of their production life. There will soon be a replacement range from Toyota, presumably with electrification in mind as well as IC engines for more remote and/or oil rich regions. No doubt that this will be a major advance on the two current LC designs that have their origin back in the late 1980's.

Obviously the older vehicles will be no worse now and in the future than when they were top dogs. Just that younger dogs have taken the top spot away. It is a testament to the quality of the original design that they have lasted in production this long.
 
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Fendtbro

Member
I agree but everything hits a bottom value at some point. There may also be a certain snob value for a significant proportion of owners of this kind of vehicle, which, with an irrational emotional involvement with their car may account for some of the aggressively defensive postures encountered when anything other than total praise is mentioned.

People do modify pickups with larger tyres, lifts and lockers also, so comparing a much modified vehicle with standard is not really relevant. In stock trim neither the pickup nor the LC are worth a damn on wet grassland slopes for instance, especially not the LC which is too heavy and whose tyres are too wide. Yes, of course you can modify both vehicles to make them more capable for the conditions.
I’ve no quibble with the LC being built to a higher quality standard. It did cost from £43,000 at launch of the 100 series in 1998, which was about four times the price of a Ranger back then. It was in a totally different league back in 1998, but time, tide, improving built quality and technology and engineering advances wait for no man. It is a vehicle of its time.

It’s replacement, the 200 series, never caught on or sold in the same way as the 100 series and despite the improvements it was out of date even when launched. It lost out big time to the JLR models in the UK. Where the 100 series could compete here up until the V8 diesel Range Rover was launched, the 200 just bombed. In other regions it sold fine with Toyota having a far superior dealer and backup network worldwide than JLR. Both the 150 and 200 LC are now less competitive against newer worldwide rivals from JLR and the US brands and are at the end of their production life. There will soon be a replacement range from Toyota, presumably with electrification in mind as well as IC engines for more remote and/or oil rich regions. No doubt that this will be a major advance on the two current LC designs that have their origin back in the late 1980's.

Obviously the older vehicles will be no worse now and in the future than when they were top dogs. Just that younger dogs have taken the top spot away. It is a testament to the quality of the original design that they have lasted in production this long.
The big landcruisers pretty much have bottomed out. And the nice 80’s are climbing now. The 100’s are bound to follow.. Not sure if you are much of a spanner man Ducky but the 80’s are designed to be worked on anywhere in the world with basic tools, they are very easy to fix compared to Isuzu/Mitsubishi and especially the horrendous to work on ranger (I stripped my pals one and waxed it, gave up trying to remove the headlights and bumper..) must be a dealer only job??! The landcruisers have thick quality paint that lasts for decades, the ranger paint is paper thin and at 3 years old is failing all over the place and rust setting in! . There are 2 pals here with rotten porus sumps on rangers under 5 years old!! Can’t claim much quality about that. As for off road, the cruisers massive well designed wheel arches can run huge tyres with loads of suspension flex, the pickups can only run pram wheels in comparison and have next to no flex compared to the 80. As for too heavy, have you tried the lc with mud tyres?? I have fresh 305 cooper sst’s on the 80 and it’s not been stuck yet and we are as steep as steep gets!!
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
The big landcruisers pretty much have bottomed out. And the nice 80’s are climbing now. The 100’s are bound to follow.. Not sure if you are much of a spanner man Ducky but the 80’s are designed to be worked on anywhere in the world with basic tools, they are very easy to fix compared to Isuzu/Mitsubishi and especially the horrendous to work on ranger (I stripped my pals one and waxed it, gave up trying to remove the headlights and bumper..) must be a dealer only job??! The landcruisers have thick quality paint that lasts for decades, the ranger paint is paper thin and at 3 years old is failing all over the place and rust setting in! . There are 2 pals here with rotten porus sumps on rangers under 5 years old!! Can’t claim much quality about that. As for off road, the cruisers massive well designed wheel arches can run huge tyres with loads of suspension flex, the pickups can only run pram wheels in comparison and have next to no flex compared to the 80. As for too heavy, have you tried the lc with mud tyres?? I have fresh 305 cooper sst’s on the 80 and it’s not been stuck yet and we are as steep as steep gets!!
Since I want to live and the LC spent the vast majority of its time on the road, no mud tyres on mine. The articulation disadvantage of modern vehicle compared to 80 series or old Land/Range Rovers has been overcome by technology while giving far superior ride and handling on the road.
I don‘t agree about the build quality of the Ranger. While it certainly isn’t as well built as a LC there is nothing wrong with its serviceability and my seven year old has great paintwork and is rust free. It’s only a week since the winter’s mud and salt was washed off, its first wash this year, to reveal an as-new shine. While clean I took the opportunity to spray the chassis with an oil and diesel mix to keep it good, which is less than I usually did for the Cruiser which had a complete underbody clean and waxoyling three times in its life.

As I previously said, you can’t compare a vehicle modified for specific conditions with an unmodified vehicle. However, your 80 series has pee poor brakes from the factory for its size and weight, no ABS in all probability, and with mud tyres undoubtedly has a braking distance best compared with an oil tanker rather than anything modernand stock. Apples and oranges you see.
 

Fendtbro

Member
Is what I am trying to explain is that the 80 is far more capable off road from factory and vastly more so with a few easy modifications. For some people this really matters.. As for trying to get up a wet grass field with a Loaded box on, clamping the brakes on to try and avoid wheel spin is simply the manufacturer cost cutting on making a locking diff! Come to the north of Scotland with 8 months of salt on the roads, a friends ranger was scrapped at 10 years old with serious rot.. all other 4x4’s are as bad of course.
 
just look on the dreaded Ebay for the prices of such an outdated dinosaur, (in some ones eyes) as for the dreadful outdated 200 series, You try looking for one under £25k ?? If you find one without spaceship miles for less please let me know !! Talking to a mechanic friend earlier ,He had been offered a55 plate Range Rover sport with 135k on it needing 3 new injectors and a high pressure pump for £1500 pounds !! He turned it down !! As Too Dear !! rather telling ??
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
just look on the dreaded Ebay for the prices of such an outdated dinosaur, (in some ones eyes) as for the dreadful outdated 200 series, You try looking for one under £25k ?? If you find one without spaceship miles for less please let me know !! Talking to a mechanic friend earlier ,He had been offered a55 plate Range Rover sport with 135k on it needing 3 new injectors and a high pressure pump for £1500 pounds !! He turned it down !! As Too Dear !! rather telling ??
The LC 200 is almost as rare as hen's teeth in the UK. People that want one will just have to pay. If there were thousands on the market like there are Range Rovers, that sell new by the gross annually, it would be a different story due to the choice available compared to the number of buyers that want older 'premium' vehicles that are costly to run. Especially if they fall into the high mileage and high road tax category. Plenty of choice you see. If the RR Sport is like what some farmers around here run to herd cattle and general farm work, I too would run a mile and wouldn't buy it at any cost. Plenty of nice mid price immaculate moderate mileage ones around that have never towed or been off tarmac.
 
Well I was going to look at a 2002 local one with 112k and fsh, guy wanted £6k it sold within 24hrs to a chap from Cumbria, 250 odd miles away. Not too keen on a pickup I don’t like cart springs, last one was a series 3 station wagon with a 2.25 diesel.
 

Robt

Member
Location
Suffolk
What do the v8 diesel year 2012 onwards make? They had massive power . Once seen a farmer in Norfolk reverse up to a 18ton grain trailer , lower the rear air suspension put it on the tow ball, raise suspension and drive off. It was empty but still just weigh 5 ton. It didn’t break a sweat
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
What do the v8 diesel year 2012 onwards make? They had massive power . Once seen a farmer in Norfolk reverse up to a 18ton grain trailer , lower the rear air suspension put it on the tow ball, raise suspension and drive off. It was empty but still just weigh 5 ton. It didn’t break a sweat
It must have been very light at the front, that trailer. The LC has a very low payload with the height adjustable suspension. Both 100 and 200 series. I often had my cattle trailer loaded and it would default to its low setting and sulk there, refusing to lift. This is with a 14ft IW triple axle with four cattle in, not an 18 ton gross, 5 ton tare [which is probably too low an estimate for an 18 ton trailer]. In fact the LC's limit is little more than a tank of fuel, four people on board and a 200kg trailer nose weight. I bet it doesn't have more than 200kgs spare, if that, before hitting its gross weight limit.
 
JLR products are like French tractors in my experience, their performance when new is as good as the Germans, the issue is when you run them on and you’re replacing parts multiple times eg I’m onto replacing central door locking locks twice now and I’ve had two low pressure fuel pumps. I’ve only known Land Rovers and I can fix them on farm but I’d honestly not trust mine if I wanted to drive to Morocco, it is 17 years old mind! Perhaps I should compromise on the ride and buy a newer Hilux?
 
The LC 200 is almost as rare as hen's teeth in the UK. People that want one will just have to pay. If there were thousands on the market like there are Range Rovers, that sell new by the gross annually, it would be a different story due to the choice available compared to the number of buyers that want older 'premium' vehicles that are costly to run. Especially if they fall into the high mileage and high road tax category. Plenty of choice you see. If the RR Sport is like what some farmers around here run to herd cattle and general farm work, I too would run a mile and wouldn't buy it at any cost. Plenty of nice mid price immaculate moderate mileage ones around that have never towed or been off tarmac.
LC 200 has a huge following over here...now all Sold Out awaiting the new 300 series... currently fetching a $10k premium over new.........we bought a V8 three years ago ...cost $135,000 (about 67,000 pounds).. scary money to part with..... did 55, 000 kilometres and sold it earlier in the year for another... Toyota Driveaway Price now $135k.. no haggling....paid $12k to change!... they always say buying the first one makes you feel faint....but changeover price makes you smile........show me something else that tows like the V8 and hold its value so well and I'll buy it........ even 20 year old versions with 350k on the clock are fetching $25k to 30k!!!!
 

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