Seed treatment applicatior

Clive

Staff Member
NFFN Member
Location
Lichfield
The trouble will be in getting hold of the chemicals, as they are carefully controlled, being toxic in bulk.

no problem and no more toxic than anything else we all use on farms

if you can’t get them give @Lucy @ Farm Marketplace a call www.marketplace.farm can get them

they chemicals are cheap when you buy them in a can vs applied to seed ! That’s the real reason some are not keen to supply them
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
no problem and no more toxic than anything else we all use on farms

if you can’t get them give @Lucy @ Farm Marketplace a call www.marketplace.farm can get them

they chemicals are cheap when you buy them in a can vs applied to seed ! That’s the real reason some are not keen to supply them

Even cheaper if you work out what the actives are and buy it as a T* can of fungicide. (so cheap you wont believe it)
 

grommet

Member
Location
The shire...
i would assume you may have to have relevant qualifications to apply seed treatment - also this stuff has to be applied accurately? i remember hearing the mobile guys talk about the treaters being very expensive exactly because of the dose rates are so critical to get the desired effect.
And lastly, if you did apply this stuff on your own - what would be the re-course if you had a problem? im sure bayer or syngenta wouldnt take to kindly their products being mis used.
Also its a bit like saying, glyphosate is mega cheap in a can - the reason its not mega cheap when its applied accurately and doing its job is that the sprayer costs the same as a small house!
 

Clive

Staff Member
NFFN Member
Location
Lichfield
i would assume you may have to have relevant qualifications to apply seed treatment - also this stuff has to be applied accurately? i remember hearing the mobile guys talk about the treaters being very expensive exactly because of the dose rates are so critical to get the desired effect.
And lastly, if you did apply this stuff on your own - what would be the re-course if you had a problem? im sure bayer or syngenta wouldnt take to kindly their products being mis used.
Also its a bit like saying, glyphosate is mega cheap in a can - the reason its not mega cheap when its applied accurately and doing its job is that the sprayer costs the same as a small house!


yes - sent my guys on the relevant course to get their ticket, not much £ and a half day - not a big deal

Frankly i trust them to apply better than the half trained eastern European seasonal workers that come with the mobile seed cleaner units !
 
Last edited:

robbie

Member
BASIS
i would assume you may have to have relevant qualifications to apply seed treatment - also this stuff has to be applied accurately? i remember hearing the mobile guys talk about the treaters being very expensive exactly because of the dose rates are so critical to get the desired effect.
And lastly, if you did apply this stuff on your own - what would be the re-course if you had a problem? im sure bayer or syngenta wouldnt take to kindly their products being mis used.
Also its a bit like saying, glyphosate is mega cheap in a can - the reason its not mega cheap when its applied accurately and doing its job is that the sprayer costs the same as a small house!
I really don't think it's as big a deal as you say yes the dose needs to be correct but it doesnt need to be any more accurate than a field application of chemical and were all capable of that.

As for the mobile dressers from my experience some of them are the biggest cowboys going, from what I've seen it is a very slap happy job and I'd expect the vast majority of farmers out there to be able to do the job on farm at least as accurately as the mobiles, after all it's in a farmers best interest to get it right as it's his own destiny. The mobile chaps will be up the road and onto the next job and not give a gig about the farmers crops.

Yet again it's just scare mongering from the trade to frighten the farmer to part with just a little bit more of his hard earned.

Redigo pro or what ever it's called is only proline and teb, it's hardly rocket science.
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
you can just meter into auger as they do in many countries but coverage is not as good as if you spray a curtain of grain

i will try find the thread with our head details in it
The old shell seed treaters were just an ill fitting auger (to allow grain to slip back and mix more) with a precision pump which pumped when the hopper tripped another batch, it only dribbled the chemical in then. I seem to think most were modified from powder mercury applicators.
 

grommet

Member
Location
The shire...
I really don't think it's as big a deal as you say yes the dose needs to be correct but it doesnt need to be any more accurate than a field application of chemical and were all capable of that.

As for the mobile dressers from my experience some of them are the biggest cowboys going, from what I've seen it is a very slap happy job and I'd expect the vast majority of farmers out there to be able to do the job on farm at least as accurately as the mobiles, after all it's in a farmers best interest to get it right as it's his own destiny. The mobile chaps will be up the road and onto the next job and not give a gig about the farmers crops.

Yet again it's just scare mongering from the trade to frighten the farmer to part with just a little bit more of his hard earned.

Redigo pro or what ever it's called is only proline and teb, it's hardly rocket science.

Can you imagine if you heard someone talk about farmers like that? a whole industry summed up in a few words.
Maybe you should quit farming and be a consultant.
its like saying " id expect the vast majority of seed cleaners out there to be able to do the job of a farmer at least as well as you could - its hardly rocket science"
If you throw dirt - you lose ground.
 

Chae1

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
I really don't think it's as big a deal as you say yes the dose needs to be correct but it doesnt need to be any more accurate than a field application of chemical and were all capable of that.

As for the mobile dressers from my experience some of them are the biggest cowboys going, from what I've seen it is a very slap happy job and I'd expect the vast majority of farmers out there to be able to do the job on farm at least as accurately as the mobiles, after all it's in a farmers best interest to get it right as it's his own destiny. The mobile chaps will be up the road and onto the next job and not give a gig about the farmers crops.

Yet again it's just scare mongering from the trade to frighten the farmer to part with just a little bit more of his hard earned.

Redigo pro or what ever it's called is only proline and teb, it's hardly rocket science.


One around here was rumoured to use beetroot juice to change colour of the seed and charged for chemical dressing! :ROFLMAO:
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
Can you imagine if you heard someone talk about farmers like that? a whole industry summed up in a few words.
Maybe you should quit farming and be a consultant.
its like saying " id expect the vast majority of seed cleaners out there to be able to do the job of a farmer at least as well as you could - its hardly rocket science"
If you throw dirt - you lose ground.
My point was more to do with how yet again farmers are sold to by the trade, its special chemical, its special equipment blah blah blah yes it's a specialist machine but then most are in agriculture and its chemical which is the same active ingredients as a can of kestrel fungicide.

It's just another case of you cant do that but we can and wring a little more out of you in the process.
 

Is Red tractor detrimental to your mental health?

  • Yes, Red tractor increase my stress and anxiety

    Votes: 284 98.3%
  • No, Red tractor gives me peace of mind that the product I produce is safe to enter the food chain

    Votes: 5 1.7%

HSENI names new farm safety champions

  • 117
  • 0
Written by William Kellett from Agriland

Farm-safety-640x360.png
The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
Top