Sequesting carbon

delilah

Member
As long as the money is coming in and the shareholders are happy who cares?
I saw that there was a thread on here along the lines of 'how are your shares doing', I didn't dare have a read for fear of getting in a barney about the sorts of businesses farmers may be invested in lol.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
I’m doubtful there is much we can to do that will actually sequester carbon rapidly enough and permanently enough to make much impact on the huge amounts released by burning fossil fuels.
Anything we do helps, but I just don’t think it’s right to carry on burning fossil fuels wastefully or frivolously and try to excuse that by relying on dubious sequestration schemes.
It’s a scheme to enable the rich to carry on as they are in the same way as the church used to sell indulgences.
 

devonbeef

Member
yes this has been said several times already, the point im trying to ask is are farms actually seeing the money from the "big business" and what quantity of carbon do you sequester of say 1 gbp? has anyone on the forum sequested carbon for an actual payment?
good question. Can we farm multi nationals, milk them 3 times a day, i reckon. trying to get a clause free contract would be fun.I am sure it would be wrigging with worms.
 

Billboy1

Member
Set yourself up as a carbon broker like the) carbon neutral company ) as usual the middle man will take a big slice
 
Discussed here. Think I did a reasonable job of explaining the pitfalls. In short don't do it.
 

T Hectares

Member
Location
Berkshire
Discussed here. Think I did a reasonable job of explaining the pitfalls. In short don't do it.
I share your concerns, we are working through our first Carbon audit and it’s a mess, there’s gaping holes in some of the processes and trading credits with a multinational corporation scares the sh*t out of me for the future implications, it makes me concerned that industries calculations are as vague too, I think these audits can plot a trend of your carbon use/sequestration over a period but that’s about it...
 

farmerm

Member
Location
Shropshire
Ok after listening to a podcast today Aussi ranches are requesting carbon for microsoft, so can anyone fill me in on how to get hooked up to a company ho would pay me for the "use of land" to sequester carbon in the uk. I see big business banging on about how kind to the environment they are being by offsetting there own dirty footprint on a nice piece of unspoilt land, who arranges these transactions ? how much land do you need? is anyone on the forum involved in any projects like this ? BTH they also said that feedlot beef produced massive amounts of co2 but that cows allowed to roam free had a tiny carbon footprint and that because the helped build up the sold structure with dung they actually helped the situation .. finally someone with a wide eye on the job :) Thought? P.s im not trying to do this i just though it might be a topic the forum could do with ?
Wait until 10 years down the line, someone recalculates what you have actually sequestered and you find you have to buy carbon credits from somewhere else (at an inflated market value) to make up the difference. Its all bollox, the real winners will be the schemers who make up the schemes. I fundamentally disagree with the concept that none agri businesses can buy carbon credits from Agriculture and Forrestry whilst Agriculture and Forestry remains far from offsetting the carbon emissions from Agriculture and Forrest. Any carbon held in the top 2m of the earth or biomass above is not truly sequestered, it remains part of the active carbon cycle.
 

Y Fan Wen

Member
Location
N W Snowdonia
Screw this thread I only asked a question and have been with a barrage of abuse, thanks guys. Ps thanks to the one guy who was helpful
I can't add much but I believe someone around here has 200 acres of new forest, 100,000 trees and is reputed to rent them out at 15p per tree per year. I have no idea if this is true tho'.
Meanwhile, frozen Texas produced 1.5 billion barrels of oil and 10 trillion cubic feet of gas last year.
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Screw this thread I only asked a question and have been with a barrage of abuse, thanks guys. Ps thanks to the one guy who was helpful
I don't think the belligerence was aimed at you.

The business I used to work for sold carbon credits on some new woodland it planted in 2011 to some shell company. I can't remember the figure but it wasn't a big income & we had to make guarantees of a certain amount of biomass growth which meant we had to be sharp about replanting where the inevitable losses happened. Last year there was a day out by some of the employees of the firm who bought the carbon with cameras for their PR machine. All very nice virtue signalling! We had no idea what they did with the carbon & were quite cagey about discussing it.

Is this going to be a giant piece of hypocrisy? Yes. An opportunity for farmers? Definitely. This isn't going away and there will be a good demand for carbon offsetting. Other public goods are available too - biodiversity net gain, nitrate & phosphate mitigation, floodwater holding...

My major concern is that my farm is nowhere near net carbon gain at the moment. I haven't reguarly measured the soil organic matters but would think that they are roughly neutral. Fertiliser and cultivations are the net losers and our hedgerows & woodlands net gains. We're converting solar power and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates that leave the farm in 29t artics.
 

farmerm

Member
Location
Shropshire
I don't think the belligerence was aimed at you.

The business I used to work for sold carbon credits on some new woodland it planted in 2011 to some shell company. I can't remember the figure but it wasn't a big income & we had to make guarantees of a certain amount of biomass growth which meant we had to be sharp about replanting where the inevitable losses happened. Last year there was a day out by some of the employees of the firm who bought the carbon with cameras for their PR machine. All very nice virtue signalling! We had no idea what they did with the carbon & were quite cagey about discussing it.

Is this going to be a giant piece of hypocrisy? Yes. An opportunity for farmers? Definitely. This isn't going away and there will be a good demand for carbon offsetting. Other public goods are available too - biodiversity net gain, nitrate & phosphate mitigation, floodwater holding...

My major concern is that my farm is nowhere near net carbon gain at the moment. I haven't reguarly measured the soil organic matters but would think that they are roughly neutral. Fertiliser and cultivations are the net losers and our hedgerows & woodlands net gains. We're converting solar power and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates that leave the farm in 29t artics.
and most of the carbon in those 29t artics is rapidly converted back to atmospheric CO2/CO3 shortly after it is consumed. Its all carbon cycle not carbon sequestration. Aside possibly from sinking timber into a deep sea trench, true carbon sequestration takes millions of years.
 

Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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