sesame planting and combine header

omran.mubarak

Member
Arable Farmer
I'm planning to plant sesame using a non-shattering variety, so i supposed to arrange for planting and i wonder if using a row crop planter would be beneficiary otherwise, I should use a seed drill, the second thing that discomforts me is could i use a pneumatic planter for sesame seeds, because we need to have a specific population with specific distance between lines and equally in-line distance.
The second matter is harvesting sesame with combine harvester does it need a special header for the combine harvested because this crop will have a high yield since it will be irrigated using a pivot irrigation system
 

uztrac

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
fakenham-norfolk
In the Sudan we used a standard MF 500 series combines with standard headers they worked well with no modifications.
However,it is essential that the combining is monitored every minute due to the very very small seed size.I am of course talking about the mid 70's prior to new sprays etc that may well be available to make life easier. Anyway good luck !!
 

Farmer Roy

Member
Arable Farmer
This is the Farming Forum and has members across the world. Perhaps our Australian cousins know a little about this from @Farmer Roy

dont know much about sesame except it likes it hot & dry & is worth a lot of $$$.
Last time I looked into it, there was only about 500 ha grown in Australia, but with a lot of potential for growth with new varieties & if marketing & processing ever catch up . . .
I believe it can be planted, grown & harvested with what we would consider fairly conventional equipment, just have to take into consideration the very small seed size

if you can be bothered, go to page 214
 

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
I am very allergic to sesame and a good dose of it would likely kill me. Not something I have had all my life, it started in my late thirties ish. Prior to that I would eat it just like anyone else, even used to buy the loaves covered with it, McDonalds or any other burger bun with sesame were fine etc. I now have pretty much no tolerance of it at all and react quite badly to it if it is in my food, have to read every label where it might be hidden and it gets into a lot of foods you wouldn't expect.

If hay fever sufferers get much worse symptoms when grass is being cut, would a sesame allergy be set off if they were combining it nearby? Must be damned dangerous for people living where it is produced if they are allergic to it.
 

Farmer Roy

Member
Arable Farmer
Sesame is one of the oldest cultivated plants & is mainly grown in third world / underdeveloped countries with ( generally ) very large populations.

just a guess, but maybe an allergy to it is a genetic / human evolution trait ?

a bit like lactose intolerance, which is more common among people with an Asian background ( due to dairy not traditionally being part of their diet ), compared to Northern Europeans who have been consuming cows milk for many many generations ?

food allergies are an interesting thing, with I think many interlinked & complicated factors.

when I was a kid, everyone ate peanut butter, eggs, wheat flour & drank cows milk. Now, intolerance & allergies ( not just “fashion” trends, but serious anaphylactic reactions & even death ) seem very common.

is diagnosis getting better, are people getting weaker, or is there something seriously wrong with our food production & processing ?

dunno ?

but yes, I love sesame & that’s one of the reasons I was interested in it
 

Lowland1

Member
Mixed Farmer
I’ve seen a lot grown in Tanzania all dry land and hand planted and harvested. From what i read about food allergies it seems to be because children are brought up in very sterile environments these days. Tolerances to food can change i was in China years ago and people didn’t eat milk or cheese because apparently they were lactose intolerant but now dairy is big business. I can’t drink milk it makes me sick but that’s down to free school milk we were forced to drink.
 

alomy75

Member
I’ve seen a lot grown in Tanzania all dry land and hand planted and harvested. From what i read about food allergies it seems to be because children are brought up in very sterile environments these days. Tolerances to food can change i was in China years ago and people didn’t eat milk or cheese because apparently they were lactose intolerant but now dairy is big business. I can’t drink milk it makes me sick but that’s down to free school milk we were forced to drink.
This. We have a 3yr old and a 6 month old. We’ve been feeding both of them as much allergy-risky stuff as poss at a young age in the hope that they don’t develop an allergy. Under health visitor advice I might add…! The bee sting day-out was an interesting one…(joke 😂)
 

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
The increase of food intolerances may well be due to how kids are raised these days, or the environment they are raised in but that doesn't explain my allergy.
Most certainly wasn't raised in a sterile environment, I was pretty much brought up in a field as both parents worked on the fruit and veg farms. A big extended family and we all played in the soil, puddles etc. Also had livestock, cats, dogs, poultry etc. Was never a fussy eater and we ate a wide range of foods and still do. Milk was free at school and used to have milk from the bulk tank fairly often but not always.
I can't think of any reason for me to become allergic to sesame in my 30's with no allergy to it prior to that and no other allergies, not even hay fever.
 

2wheels

Member
Location
aberdeenshire
I’ve seen a lot grown in Tanzania all dry land and hand planted and harvested. From what i read about food allergies it seems to be because children are brought up in very sterile environments these days. Tolerances to food can change i was in China years ago and people didn’t eat milk or cheese because apparently they were lactose intolerant but now dairy is big business. I can’t drink milk it makes me sick but that’s down to free school milk we were forced to drink.
you weren't forced to drink the milk were you? when i was in secondary school a lot of pupils didn't drink the free milk which came in 1/3pt bottles. however another gannet and myself usually mopped up the surplus. i think my record was 9 bottles in about 10 minutes. yes it stayed down. :D
 

Farmer Roy

Member
Arable Farmer
We had a school milk scheme ( NSW Australia ) when I was a kid in primary school ( 5 - 11 ) in the 70’s. The milk would be delivered in crates in glass bottles, then left outside in the sun till we were forced to drink it for recess . . .
In Australia
During summer
It made me physically ill & vomit, to the extent that my mum sent a note to school asking them not to force me to drink it.
I never drank milk again until my mid 20’s ( when I was working in a dairy in the UK, funnily enough ) . . .
I wonder how many other kids it put off milk for years or for life ?
 
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Lowland1

Member
Mixed Farmer
The increase of food intolerances may well be due to how kids are raised these days, or the environment they are raised in but that doesn't explain my allergy.
Most certainly wasn't raised in a sterile environment, I was pretty much brought up in a field as both parents worked on the fruit and veg farms. A big extended family and we all played in the soil, puddles etc. Also had livestock, cats, dogs, poultry etc. Was never a fussy eater and we ate a wide range of foods and still do. Milk was free at school and used to have milk from the bulk tank fairly often but not always.
I can't think of any reason for me to become allergic to sesame in my 30's with no allergy to it prior to that and no other allergies, not even hay fever.
Peoples metabolism change with age i’d say but that’s just a guess.
you weren't forced to drink the milk were you? when i was in secondary school a lot of pupils didn't drink the free milk which came in 1/3pt bottles. however another gannet and myself usually mopped up the surplus. i think my record was 9 bottles in about 10 minutes. yes it stayed down. :D
Yes we were. It’s really put me off it for life as a drink. We used to have dairy cows and i like it in my tea etc but the thought of drinking it makes me shudder. Obviously i need counselling.
 

Barleymow

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Ipswich
We had a school milk scheme ( NSW Australia ) when I was a kid in primary school ( 5 - 11 ) in the 70’s. The milk would be delivered in crates in glass bottles, then left outside in the sun till we were forced to drink it for recess . . .
In Australia
During summer
It made me physically ill & vomit, to the extent that my mum sent a note to school asking them not to force me to drink it.
I never drank milk again until my mid 20’s ( when I was working in a dairy in the UK, funnily enough ) . . .
I wonder how many other kids it put off milk for years or for life ?
We used to race to get ready at the end of school,to be allowed to drink the milk left from the morning, it certainly wasn't cold
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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