Share farming/ contract farming sheep

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
I appreciate I am the t.wat here, but are you seriously telling me that farmers do not buy land and pay for it by farming ?
Around here it’s mainly farmers who buy land if it’s over 30 acre. All paid for by farming. Mainly dairy but some beef and sheep farmers too. It’s possible alright, I was offered first refusal on a place which I was already renting and the mortgage wasn’t much more than the rent I was paying. The multiple houses made it unfinancially viable for me even though I could have sold the houses several times over soon after but the seller wanted 1 deal.

The difference is is that the total profits from the sheep there would have gone to repay the mortgage leaving nothing for other costs at all. If someone wanted that sort of money as rent, then no one would rent the land as it would be totally unviable 🤷🏻‍♂️
 
You really are a pretty unpleasant person to discuss anything with.

You just speak to folk like they are stupid / c*nts.

Try not to take offence at that, I’m just being honest.

I don’t think you read my post at all. She’s not making maximum return on her investment at all. She has pulled all income streams out and is making nothing.

Do you grasp how many laundering works ?

The point of my post is that different ground in different areas has a huge variance in parameters. And so therefore there is a huge variance in rental value.

Due to non production factors leading the way in setting land value these days, there is far less of a variance in land purchase value.

Renting land out is only one income stream and way of capitalising or adding value to the land.

Only an idiot would but land with the sole
Idea of making it pay them back by renting it out for farming. There are far better investments of merely looking for that kind of return.

I’m still trying to work out why you have such an issue.

I pay from £0 to £100 an acre. I also pay from 20p to 50p a head / week. Different ground has different values.
Very unpleasant person me, we have different views, I'll leave it at that and offer my apologies.
 

Anymulewilldo

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Cheshire
I appreciate I am the t.wat here, but are you seriously telling me that farmers do not buy land and pay for it by farming ?
They do, and usually there is roll over investment or income streams from out of the sector to bolster the job.
However a farmer doesn’t buy land as an investment and then rent it too other farmers too pay for it do they? They buy land, add it too their existing business, grow bigger and pay for it using the whole business. Not just the money generated of that one block of land. Also you have the Subsidy factor. A large outfit with a BPS and environmental scheme payment of tens of thousands of pounds a year can pay for land without actually farming it very much.

I’m not saying you’re a tw!t at all. But you appear too be very aggressive. Feel free too come and rent land at a value that pays back a 10k/acre investment purely from farming that land. I’ll buy you a brew at your dispersal.

I know of several big dairy outfits down on the plain who have been buying neighbouring land in the 12-17k/ acre range. But they have all sold BIG lumps for building this last 10 years.
 

Mc115reed

Member
Livestock Farmer
Farming money doesn’t buy farms and that’s a fact, anyone arguing it is the village idiot… farmers that buy land too farm almost always already own there exsisting holding so the mortgage is offset against there exsisting land… if they already own 200 acre mortgage free they’re paying 0 rent or mortgage… they then buy 100 acre which has say for arguement sake a mortgage payment of 40k a year, now you offset that against the 200 acre they pay nothing on and they’re effectively paying out £133 an acre a year…
And they’ve gained a f**king expensive asset…
 
Farming money doesn’t buy farms and that’s a fact, anyone arguing it is the village idiot… farmers that buy land too farm almost always already own there exsisting holding so the mortgage is offset against there exsisting land… if they already own 200 acre mortgage free they’re paying 0 rent or mortgage… they then buy 100 acre which has say for arguement sake a mortgage payment of 40k a year, now you offset that against the 200 acre they pay nothing on and they’re effectively paying out £133 an acre a year…
And they’ve gained a f**king expensive asset…
What he said.
 
Farming money doesn’t buy farms and that’s a fact, anyone arguing it is the village idiot… farmers that buy land too farm almost always already own there exsisting holding so the mortgage is offset against there exsisting land… if they already own 200 acre mortgage free they’re paying 0 rent or mortgage… they then buy 100 acre which has say for arguement sake a mortgage payment of 40k a year, now you offset that against the 200 acre they pay nothing on and they’re effectively paying out £133 an acre a year…
And they’ve gained a f**king expensive asset…
Life doesn't seem fair sometimes especially when you are young and ambitious, been there felt that. However that's how it is. If you look at a lot of farming businesses their success depends on what their grand-fathers did, hence in the example above. I don't have to look far to see 2 farmers, very similar farms, one whose grand-father bought the farm when the landlord was selling and the other who didn't. They both work hard but the first one is comfortably off, just converting a barn for a house etc. The second ended up on an FBT when his grand-mother died and was booted off at the end of it. Their farming lives were more greatly influenced by previous generations than what they have done themselves. I can think of loads of examples like that, the benefits from land ownership are very long term, over several generations.

Regarding outside money financing buying land. This is not a new thing, if you go back to Victorian times, the big estates were mostly owned by industrialists who made their money in the industrial revolution and bought land. The modern day equivalents do the same. One of the big problems with this now, is that in an ideal food producing country, there can be more money in not producing food, rather than helping to feed people. As I said in a post sometime ago I think this is an immoral crime.
 
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glasshouse

Member
Location
lothians
Life doesn't seem fair sometimes especially when you are young and ambitious, been there felt that. However that's how it is. If you look at a lot of farming businesses their success depends on what their grand-fathers did, hence in the example above. I don't have to look far to see 2 farmers, very similar farms, one whose grand-father bought the farm when the landlord was selling and the other who didn't. They both work hard but the first one is comfortably off, just converting a barn for a house etc. The second ended up on an FBT when his grand-mother died and was booted off at the end of it. Their farming lives were more greatly influenced by previous generations than what they have done themselves. I can think of loads of examples like that, the benefits from land ownership are very long term, over several generations.

Regarding outside money financing buying land. This is not a new thing, if you go back to Victorian times, the big estates were mostly owned by industrialists who made their money in the industrial revolution and bought land. The modern day equivalents do the same. One of the big problems with this now, is that in an ideal food producing country, there can be more money in not producing food, rather than helping to feed people. As I said in a post sometime ago I think this is an immoral crime.
Well said.
The accident of birth.
Not many see it that way though.
 
So nineteen years ago I was penniless and homeless sleeping in a van on pub car parks, I got a council tenancy and have been milking my own cow's since, I have now bought my own place, please tell me where I've gone so wrong ? (I will add it hasn't always been a walk in the park, and still isn't) I will add, I only asked a simple question ,yes or no ?
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
So nineteen years ago I was penniless and homeless sleeping in a van on pub car parks, I got a council tenancy and have been milking my own cow's since, I have now bought my own place, please tell me where I've gone so wrong ? (I will add it hasn't always been a walk in the park, and still isn't) I will add, I only asked a simple question ,yes or no ?
You're an inspiration 💪
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
Rest assured I'm not, to quote post's above people who buy farm's with money earnt from farming are village idiots. (I do wish you luck)
as I said above. Around here big farms are bought by farmers - albeit almost all milking. Small pockets and small holdings tend to be bought by non farmers. Every area is different though 🤷🏻‍♂️

Well done though 👌🏼
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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