Sheep winter housing

Paul86

Member
I should add, the shed allows us to winter the ewes relatively cheaply on good pit silage compared to renting a lot of winter grazing which has become stupidly expensive and almost non existent now in this area
It's a different game for a lot of us in Ireland compared to lads in the UK imo. If the sheep on my farm weren't housed or else sent away to winter grazing the amount of stock I could carry would be far far lower. I do admire the big runs of land ye do have. It's great to have it!
 
Depends where you live, letting out shorn sheep after lambing around here would be a disaster
It depends on wool length and shearing time, an inch of wool provides 90% of the protection of a full fleece. Shear just before scanning at around 70days after mating, that would leave another 80 days before turn out. shearing at 70 days leads to twin lambs 0.5kg heavier at birth (1kg heavier at weaning), more space at feed troughs so more ewes per pen, what else gives a lift in performance and a drop in costs?
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
It depends on wool length and shearing time, an inch of wool provides 90% of the protection of a full fleece. Shear just before scanning at around 70days after mating, that would leave another 80 days before turn out. shearing at 70 days leads to twin lambs 0.5kg heavier at birth (1kg heavier at weaning), more space at feed troughs so more ewes per pen, what else gives a lift in performance and a drop in costs?
Is a higher birth weight necessarily a good thing, particularly as the OP wants to turn out for lambing?
 

hally

Member
Location
cumbria
It depends on wool length and shearing time, an inch of wool provides 90% of the protection of a full fleece. Shear just before scanning at around 70days after mating, that would leave another 80 days before turn out. shearing at 70 days leads to twin lambs 0.5kg heavier at birth (1kg heavier at weaning), more space at feed troughs so more ewes per pen, what else gives a lift in performance and a drop in costs?
I know all the theory as it’s not a new concept, was interested in it 35 years ago when first started housing ewes but every time somebody tries it around here it ends in a disaster
 
Is a higher birth weight necessarily a good thing, particularly as the OP wants to turn out for lambing?
Birth weight and survival are closely correlated in twins, and extra 0.5kg birthweight on twin born lambs will help lamb survival. For what ever reason mid preg scanning has no affect on single lambs.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Birth weight and survival are closely correlated in twins, and extra 0.5kg birthweight on twin born lambs will help lamb survival. For what ever reason mid preg scanning has no affect on single lambs.
I find the opposite, with most of my losses being down to bigger lambs, leading to a leg back, etc.

I guess it depends on your starting point. If you usually have 2.5-3kg birth weights then I can see an advantage (if the ewes can handle them), but if you have most lambs at 4-5kg then less so.
 
Cold extreme weather results in staggers or other such conditions, it’s no accident it isn’t being widely practiced......we are not all stupid and are pretty quick learners.......mostly.
I'm surprised that ewes would be affected by the cold that much, I'd assumed if it was warm enough for a lamb and warm enough for grass growth it's be warm enough for a ewe that was 11 weeks off shears.
 
I find the opposite, with most of my losses being down to bigger lambs, leading to a leg back, etc.

I guess it depends on your starting point. If you usually have 2.5-3kg birth weights then I can see an advantage (if the ewes can handle them), but if you have most lambs at 4-5kg then less so.
My under standing is that optimum birth weight is 8% of ewe weight, and survival diminishes rapidly once it goes above 95 or below 7%, so if flocks are already in that range then going up wouldn't be ideal.
 
Location
Cleveland
I’ve been thinking of getting the plastic slats for the lambing pens...is it possible to set them up on top of breeze blocks which can be removed after lambing?
 

hally

Member
Location
cumbria
I'm surprised that ewes would be affected by the cold that much, I'd assumed if it was warm enough for a lamb and warm enough for grass growth it's be warm enough for a ewe that was 11 weeks off shears.
That’s the point it’s not warm enough for grass growth often at this time of year, yesterday we didn’t get above 4degrees all day then add a stiff wind and a lot of rain and sheep don’t like it. Talking about -3 here tonight, luckily the wind and rain have died down. It will likely only be an issue in extreme conditions but sadly that’s not uncommon around here.
 
That’s the point it’s not warm enough for grass growth often at this time of year, yesterday we didn’t get above 4degrees all day then add a stiff wind and a lot of rain and sheep don’t like it. Talking about -3 here tonight, luckily the wind and rain have died down. It will likely only be an issue in extreme conditions but sadly that’s not uncommon around here.
I think we will be white in morning and we are only 1200-1300’ it’s snowing it’s taties off but not sticking yet
 

AGCO reports sales increase of 43.5% compared to 2020 figures

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Written by Agriland Team from Agriland

The tractor manufacturer AGCO, which consists of brands such as Challenger, Fendt, GSI, Massey Ferguson and Valtra, reported its results for the second quarter ending June 30, 2021.

Net sales for the second quarter were approximately $2.9 billion, an increase of approximately 43.5% compared to the second quarter of 2020.

AEM

Reported net income was $3.73/share for the second quarter of 2021, and adjusted...
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