Shogun not available in manual?

Mouser

Member
Location
near Belfast
Local stealer on with boss trying to get him to change shogun which he doesn't want to. Dealer then tells him manual gearbox isn't available anymore so if he wants one it will have to be one they have in stock. Anybody know/heard anything about this?
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
It makes no odds to me and I drive auto and manual cars with equal satisfaction, although just as I would not ideally buy a manual tractor these days, preferring a 'power-shift', I would choose most powershift cars to manual ones if given a choice.

Odd though that manual Shoguns don't seem to be available. Certainly the competition is now overwhelmingly supplied with auto transmissions, but I always thought that the majority of Shogun were sold as manuals. The Shogun uses the same Aisin automatic as fitted to the current Isuzu pickup as an option. As such it is rather old fashioned in that it only has five speeds where most rivals now have between six and eight speeds for a more responsive drive and greater fuel economy.

Is there a new Shogun model on the horizon I wonder. It seems way overdue.
 

milkloss

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
East Sussex
I'm not overly keen on auto transmissions tbh. In the oh's Range Rover I just feel uncomfortable. Put it in sport mode for engine braking down hill or behind a dawdler, too much or too little out of junctions, me and it just do not get on. So much so that I jump in the navara rather than the Range Rover. Don't say much about modern autos does it?

And I know you're gonna say it's me, go on I don't care, missus thinks I'm useless too o_Oo_O
 
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fermerboy

Member
Location
Banffshire
I'm not overly keen on auto transmissions tbh. In the oh's Range Rover I just feel uncomfortable. Put it in sport mode for engine braking down hill or behind a dawdler, too much or too little out of junctions, me and it just do not get on. So much so that I jump in the navara rather than the Range Rover. Don't say much about modern autos does it?

And I know you're gonna say it's me, go on I don't care, missus thinks I'm useless too o_Oo_O

Your not the only one!

Everybody I spoke to said once you buy an auto car you will never go back to manual.

Well I would!! We have an auto Audi A4 and while there is nothing wrong with it, I detest driving it, I actually can't put my finger on why I don't like it, individually it ticks the boxes but as a drive i just don't enjoy it.
It might be just that particular car as I havent driven that many auto cars.

I know if the car and the truck (manual Ranger) are at the door I'll take the truck every time.
Was in my mates 6 speed manual Skoda the other day and I realised I quite miss the manual box.
Having siad that i do like my powershift gearbox tractor.

Perhaps its an age or a mindset thing. :confused:


Back to the op I used to drive my father in laws short wheelbase Shogan Ralliart edition with auto box and it was a good drive, the box and engine went well together, christ it could go both in speed and round corners, usless in field on wide treads but everythings a balance.
Not good on diesel if you were tramping it though.....

Neighbour has a lwb shogun and she tows a triaxle Ifor a lot with no problems.

Did the auto box shogun not used to be a higher towing rating?
 
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PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
Wouldnt mind a car with sequential change? Think thats what they call it. Like what rally cars have.
Sequential boxes run 'flat shift' which cuts the revs as soon as the gear lever starts to move allowing clutchless changes, but those boxes take a lot of maintaining and they would be less than ideal for driving to the village shop.
Modern paddle shift automatics are similar in action and are remarkably user friendly. Current 'mid life crisis' has a 6 speed ZF box with paddle shift and you plant the throttle and flick up through the gears, it even blips the throttle on the down shift when you cane it, like a pretend 'heel and toe'.
Drove a Civic Type R last week with a 6 speed manual and compared to paddle shift it felt utterly horrendous.
 
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ACEngineering

Member
Location
Oxon
Sequential boxes run 'flat shift' which cuts the revs as soon as the gear lever starts to move allowing clutchless changes, but those boxes take a lot of maintaining and they would be less than ideal for driving to the village shop.
Modern paddle shift automatics are similar in action and are remarkably user friendly. Current 'mid life crisis' has a 6 speed ZF box with paddle shift and you plant the throttle and flick up through the gears, it even blips the throttle on the down shift when you cane it, like a pretend 'heel and toe'.
Drove a Civic Type R last week with a 6 speed manual and compared to paddle shift it felt utterly horrendous.

I had a go kart many years ago with a motor bike engine in it, just put a linkage rod and handle on were the pedal would have been and bought it up the side of the seat, still had to clutch but you just notched it forwards or back for gears. Neutral, back for first then 3 forward notches for 2nd 3rd and 4th. that's what I was really meaning.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Bugger autos, there shite , they never shift when you want them too, but six speed manuals have to many gears and constantly forever changing gears ,but four speed manuals always feel like there missing one gear:banghead:
Firstly you don't have to use all six manual gears all the time. You can skip-shift more often than not. Even skip two years at a time sometimes. It becomes second nature and the gear skipped varies according to conditions and what your brain tells you.

Secondly, driving a good automatic well requires finesse. Your foot is in reasonable control of when it changes ratio. Stab the throttle and you will be forever hunting up and down the gears. Take it gently and you are in control of the transmission. Most will learn to adapt to your driving style over a day or two. Yes really, they are adaptive. The best ones certainly are.
 

milkloss

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
East Sussex
Firstly you don't have to use all six manual gears all the time. You can skip-shift more often than not. Even skip two years at a time sometimes. It becomes second nature and the gear skipped varies according to conditions and what your brain tells you.

Secondly, driving a good automatic well requires finesse. Your foot is in reasonable control of when it changes ratio. Stab the throttle and you will be forever hunting up and down the gears. Take it gently and you are in control of the transmission. Most will learn to adapt to your driving style over a day or two. Yes really, they are adaptive. The best ones certainly are.

May be that's the trick; if the missus and I keep separate smart keys perhaps the RR will learn who's driving and adapt throttle response and ratio changes according to our driving style. Or am I expecting too much of a company that thinks a gear knob rising out of the centre console is a good idea? (It's most definitely not btw!)
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
May be that's the trick; if the missus and I keep separate smart keys perhaps the RR will learn who's driving and adapt throttle response and ratio changes according to our driving style. Or am I expecting too much of a company that thinks a gear knob rising out of the centre console is a good idea? (It's most definitely not btw!)

I'm afraid they don't keep two profiles in memory as far as I know. However, you could drive in Sport and she could use Normal, or the other way around.

You obviously have the superb 8 speed auto, so there really should be no issue. It should shift without you even noticing and change down smoothly and immediately when you need more acceleration. Unless you stab the throttle back and forth of course, in which case it might thump up and down two or even three ratios at a time, quite sharply. But that would be you, effectively telling it to do that.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
You cannot buy a Discovery 4 with a manual gearbox so I wouldn't be surprised if more manufacturers are heading this way.

The USA market is a big one....

Is it really a USA 'thing'? I reckon that more and more of us are actively choosing automatic, because they are now so smooth and responsive and with very little fuel penalty any longer.
Automatic is particularly suitable to farm pickups by the way and I'm very surprised that it has taken so long for manufacturers to offer it. I'm sure they are pleasantly surprised that so many of us have already chosen to buy auto pickups. When it came to choosing stock `rangers at exactly the same price, I had no hesitation choosing a 2.2 auto over a 3.2 manual and have no regrets whatsoever.
 
Firstly you don't have to use all six manual gears all the time. You can skip-shift more often than not. Even skip two years at a time sometimes. It becomes second nature and the gear skipped varies according to conditions and what your brain tells you.

Secondly, driving a good automatic well requires finesse. Your foot is in reasonable control of when it changes ratio. Stab the throttle and you will be forever hunting up and down the gears. Take it gently and you are in control of the transmission. Most will learn to adapt to your driving style over a day or two. Yes really, they are adaptive. The best ones certainly are.
Yes your right, a good 4 wheel drive should be able to start off in second gear in hi range no problem at all, but really do you really need 6 gears in a manual gearbox? The old Valiant ute only had a three speed manual gearbox and that was easier to drive than most modern/new utes with 6 speeds. As for skip shifting, if that becomes second nature, you would have to ask why are those gears there if you don't need them or should the manfacturer just make a 5speed with the gear ratios slighly further apart?
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Yes your right, a good 4 wheel drive should be able to start off in second gear in hi range no problem at all, but really do you really need 6 gears in a manual gearbox? The old Valiant ute only had a three speed manual gearbox and that was easier to drive than most modern/new utes with 6 speeds. As for skip shifting, if that becomes second nature, you would have to ask why are those gears there if you don't need them or should the manfacturer just make a 5speed with the gear ratios slighly further apart?

I've done some 100 miles in a six speed manual today. Skipping gears as often as not. Going up hill in a hurry I might skip from second to fourth to sixth, usually fourth to sixth or third to fifth, depending on the road. Never started in second, although sometimes do when starting off downhill.
If you have a six speed box and a good flexible diesel engine and don't skip gears, I draw my own conclusion. I love nice flexible torquey diesels with six speeds, but certainly don't change either up or down through every ratio every time I start, stop, or accelerate. Why would anyone do so? Its not a sequential gearbox which doesn't give you any other choice, and the driver's brain is usually capable of far more sophisticated shifting than even the best computer controlled automatic.


Maybe many drivers do treat their manual gearboxes as sequential units and do shift up and down every ratio through the box all the time, I don't know. It certainly isn't at all necessary in normal varied driving conditions.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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