Small arable farm with Phosphorus deficiency Advice

kernow1

Member
Mixed Farmer
Been to see a small arable farm (38.88ha cropable) in Dorset, the land has been farmed by a Tennant diary farmer who's been using the land for whole crop possibly back to back. The
Winter wheat they have planted is showing signs of what look like Phosphorus deficiency, Would this be a long term problem with the ground or can it be rectified?

Its a slightly acidic clay soil with impeded drainage and a lot of flint whilst also showing signs of rain run off and capping.

What could I do to revitalise the land and make it more productive and how could I generate an profit from 38.88 ha?

Would be grateful to hear ideas, no idea of rotation or yields.

Thanks
 

T Hectares

Member
Location
Berkshire
You are possibly seeing transient symptoms due to the poor soil structure and cold weather
If P is low then sewage cake is your friend for building indices economically.

As for making a living from 38ha of arable land ( without more insight into the farms infrastructure and your ability to grow high value crops ) I can only suggest investing the cash you would need to take the tenancy on and investing it into scratch cards, it would probably be a safer bet

Other than that, treat it as a hobby and do the work in your spare time from your regular job and it may break even, good luck and let us know what you do
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Midlands
Get it tested, then you will know what you have to work with. 38 ha will need to be doing something different (higher value) to generate a full time job/income other than growing grass/traditional crops.
 

spin cycle

Member
Location
north norfolk
op says 'profit' not 'living'.......my indices recovered after being 'raped' by ad maize in 5years of grazing sheep/cereal/sheep horse muck....much to my and my agronomists surprise

i was putting p in the seedbed cos it's important for rooting
 

Flatlander

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lorette Manitoba
Get a soil test and a tissue test from the same positions. That way you’ll know if your visual diagnosis is correct. Best way to correct a low phosphorus level is to apply straight phos in the seed row. Way more efficient than broadcasting. if you apply expected usage then double it. It won’t all be available in the first year and will help build soil levels if done every year. As mentioned sewage sludge is a cheaper long term option but I’d be concerned with heavy metals and working in the dust from that soil after.
 

solo

Member
Location
worcestershire
Phosphorous is immobile in the soil. Apparently only moves a couple of cm. Soil testing would be my first priority. If the current crop is p deficient then I would go down the foliar route for this season as it will be too late for granule or muck to have effect. They would really be of benefit to the next crop. This chart may help in your decision making as the symptoms you are seeing could be caused by nutrient lock up rather than deficiency.

1649052803733.jpeg
 

Bogweevil

Member
Its for sale at the moment and ive spotted the dark red older leaves and stems while walkin in

If you are not going to buy it and want to check your diagnosis buy some superphosphate from the garden centre ( you won't find TSP) and treat a few sq metres. No change, think again, difference, congratulations on your astute observations.
 

teslacoils

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Its for sale at the moment and ive spotted the dark red older leaves and stems while walking.
Ownership would give more options. If you're looking at buying, check if there are drainage plans.

A few weeks on a 360 clearing ditches and outfalls; making sure pH is right etc. If the drains are backfilled, get it moled. No point in drains if they're not maintained.
 

Flat 10

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Fen Edge
You are possibly seeing transient symptoms due to the poor soil structure and cold weather
If P is low then sewage cake is your friend for building indices economically.

As for making a living from 38ha of arable land ( without more insight into the farms infrastructure and your ability to grow high value crops ) I can only suggest investing the cash you would need to take the tenancy on and investing it into scratch cards, it would probably be a safer bet

Other than that, treat it as a hobby and do the work in your spare time from your regular job and it may break even, good luck and let us know what you do
I agree, bet it's temp related. Surely if a dairy farmer was involved it's had lots of muck and slurry applied? As said a soil test will tell you.
 
TEST IT FIRST.

Then a product like Pgrow can add phosphate. It’s a dusty grit so you get good coverage (Assuming spread on a good day!) and whilst I’m not claiming it’s a miracle cure it is more mobile in your soil than TSP. It is well priced at the moment compared to anything in a bag.

It is incinerated bone meal, all passed and safe to use by Defra, EA etc. you need a moving belt spreader. @Devon James could be your man if you’re his side of Dorset. If not, give me a shout and I’ll put you in touch with someone.
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Midlands
TEST IT FIRST.

Then a product like Pgrow can add phosphate. It’s a dusty grit so you get good coverage (Assuming spread on a good day!) and whilst I’m not claiming it’s a miracle cure it is more mobile in your soil than TSP. It is well priced at the moment compared to anything in a bag.

It is incinerated bone meal, all passed and safe to use by Defra, EA etc. you need a moving belt spreader. @Devon James could be your man if you’re his side of Dorset. If not, give me a shout and I’ll put you in touch with someone.
Who did Chris Roe hand over to when he retired? James Goble? Otherwise it’s Ben Stretton for spreading and Steve Trueman for the supply.
 

Kevtherev

Member
Location
Welshpool Powys
Soil test first and the product @Cab-over Pete mentions will counter any deficiencies in Phosphate.
A foliar applied product could be the quick fix for this crop as mentioned in previous posts.
It could also be another TE deficiency in the crop so could be an idea to test that or get an experienced Agronomist to take a look perhaps…
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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