So much for market forces......

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
so your saying blah blah blah to the 3 most important points? the fact that some new entrants can claim to be farming without subs means nothing to me, are they paying themselves a proper wage, do they have outside money such as wifes wages supporting them and do they have enough money after tax to reinvest and make a decent living, i very much doubt it with beef/sheep at the moment unless in a low altitude warmer part of the uk which most of Scotland isnt
You might as well talk to the wall. He has no business experience and generally no idea about the job. That much has become obvious over the last few weeks.
 
so your saying blah blah blah to the 3 most important points? the fact that some new entrants can claim to be farming without subs means nothing to me, are they paying themselves a proper wage, do they have outside money such as wifes wages supporting them and do they have enough money after tax to reinvest and make a decent living, i very much doubt it with beef/sheep at the moment unless in a low altitude warmer part of the uk which most of Scotland isnt
Come off it mate. There is no automatic right to farm nor an automatic right to a 'decent living' (whatever that means). Your sense of entitlement along with that of others is off the scale. The public are probably reading this forum and all they see is a collection of landowners who think they deserve public money end of story.

Your complaints about beef or sheep are valid but you may have noticed that agriculture is highly cyclical in nature, prices fluctuate wildly as many people have learned the hard way the world over. Welcome to the jungle.
 
so your saying blah blah blah to the 3 most important points? the fact that some new entrants can claim to be farming without subs means nothing to me, are they paying themselves a proper wage, do they have outside money such as wifes wages supporting them and do they have enough money after tax to reinvest and make a decent living, i very much doubt it with beef/sheep at the moment unless in a low altitude warmer part of the uk which most of Scotland isnt
I really don’t understand why you farm.this has been your attitude/belief system for such a long time now. I would have buckled under the strain/negatively
 
Lazy, I have not yet been able to find the report I mentioned yesterday regarding the oil and gas industry, here is a much earlier one however:


By way of illustration, the diagram below is of interest. There is no way any EU state that is currently buying refined transport fuels (for example) from us is magically going to find someone with extra refinery capacity lying around spare, nor is someone going to build one in the next 12 months to fulfill something the UK can supply but 5% dearer. The majority of crude is coming from non-EU sources these days.
Image 1.png
 

Brexit impact on oil and gas sector: How has the industry reacted?
Despite the potential negative impacts of Brexit on the oil and gas industry, many companies and institutions are optimistic about the oil and gas industry post-Brexit.
In December 2018 Norwegian oil company Equinor announced its commitment to developing oil and gas projects on the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS) despite Brexit, with plans to drill three wells in the shelf over 2019.
Equinor executive vice-president for strategy Al Cook said: “We are putting more investments into the UK despite Brexit, the perception of North Sea as being very mature and dying and oil price gyrations. We want to make the most out of UK’s common geology with Norway.”
The UKCS is a site of great interest for oil and gas companies despite Brexit, with a number of exploration, production and decommissioning projects being planned in the area in recent years.
The UK government’s control of its energy policy and the UK oil and gas market is also expected to mitigate some of Brexit’s impact. In a statement released in September 2018, the UK government said: “The established regime for hydrocarbon licensing and environmental issues will continue to operate…UK and EU businesses will not be required to take any action.
 
I suspect that may be due to refinery capacity or some other operational consideration, probably cheaper to import the diesel than drastically change what our refineries are producing.
The problem being the refineries need to run at certain levels to be profitable and if they can’t export competitively then there will be shut downs.
 
The problem being the refineries need to run at certain levels to be profitable and if they can’t export competitively then there will be shut downs.
The European oil industry has been suffering from general malaise for some time. Several refineries have been shutdown in recent years with no buyers in sight. Its just cheaper to buy in refined diesel and aviation spirit I suspect. The usual story, European industry being borked by overzealous regulation and bureaucracy whilst being faced with stiff overseas competition.

Throw in the USA looking to export just about everything because they are stacked with it and its no wonder the oil industry is volatile.
 

brigadoon

Member
Location
Galloway
Good Lord, you cannot see that this is the Scottish Government's choice, not the EU's. A Scotland that overwhelmingly, with a far more convincing majority than the rest of England and Wales' results, voted to stay in the EU and as soon as we Brexit will vote to leave the UK itself.
There are in fact 12.5Bn reasons why you are seriously deluded - only ther truly daft would even consider an idependence vote in the near future
 

brigadoon

Member
Location
Galloway
the problem is that take away or even cut subs and straightaway what is the option for beef/sheep farmers?/ even cereals,....sell up OR go into dairy if you can get funding or a niche sector, the issue with this is there will soon be too much milk and farm diversification enterprises will become too competitive/ overcrowded
Google "scottish forestry grants"
 
I don't know what the fudge he is complaining about. Doesn't he farm 800 acres or something? Offer the land out for a half sensible rent, pocket the cash each year and spend your time mowing the lawn and chasing the wife? Hell, could go and work down the road for a neighbour doing the exact same work for cold hard cash and not have to sit and look at a single bill or worry about the next agChem that gets banned or beast that dies.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
What never fails to amaze about some farmers is how they run a business model where the odds are seriously stacked against them, be it trying to combine 38,000 acres in the wettest part of the country with a JD1085 where they have paid £200/acre rent or run a suckler herd in the outer hebrides buying every input in off the ferry ........ then they moan and blame everybody else for the fact they can't make a profit.

Well get a calculator and get real. Some business models don't add up. If it doesn't work, stop doing it. It it does work, milk it. We are already subsidised to a fair old amount. Don't push it and expect to be baled out as a result of your free choice poorly made.
 

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World Food Day: NFU Cymru celebrates Welsh food producers at the Senedd

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Written by Rachel Martin

NFU Cymru members and Assembly Members have been celebrating the role that Welsh farmers play in producing nutritious, high quality, safe affordable food during an event at the Senedd today on World Food Day (October 16).

The lunchtime event, which was sponsored by Llyr Gruffydd AM, included a special menu of fine Welsh produce.

Speaking at the event, NFU Cymru...
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