Solid urea use restricted and to be regulated by Red Tractor

David.

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
J11 M40
I think you could fairly safely put the seasons urea on in late Feb, in good conditions. So no need at all to go beyond 31.03 with it other than being dry enough to travel.
I am expecting that policing will in practice be just an added tick box alongside looking at fert records.
Can't see a big problem myself, still got urea option, happy days.
Thanks NFU. Which other unified farming industry voice do you all imagine has been lobbying for this, it won't have been CF.
 
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ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
What if you use urea/sulphur compound, like yara ureaS? Ammonia emissions are the same as AN for that. Will I require to spend more money and add an inhibitor aswell or will it be fine without?
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
I think you could fairly safely put the seasons urea on in late Feb, in good conditions. So no need at all to go beyond 31.03 with it other than being dry enough to travel.
I am expecting that policing will in practice be just an added tick box alongside looking at fert records.
Can't see a big problem myself, still got urea option, happy days.
Thanks NFU. Which other unified farming industry voice do you all imagine has been lobbying for this, it won't have been CF.
It should never had got to this stage in the first place where this is seen as a good result.
CF would have 100% been involved with this, as industry ‘stakeholders’ and members of the AIC (there top guy is on the AIC board).
Cf are also big sponsors of various NFU events.
It doesn’t take much time on Google to find many articles with CF using old flawed adas research to demonise urea, and what on earth are the Independant Association of Crop Consultants doing on an article like this? Seems to be a very big fan of Nitram. They were also heavily involved with the consultation.



 
Only in the UK industry would you see the entire establishment railing against urea, a substance widely used around the world because it reduces the volumes of fertiliser that require transportation. A fudging mental move which will reduce farmer choice, bring in yet more needless regulation and hamper industry competitiveness yet again. I don't know why you guys don't fudge the NFU, RT, AIC and AHDB off. There is no more room on the gravy train for these people.
 

Steevo

Member
Location
Gloucestershire
Only in the UK industry would you see the entire establishment railing against urea, a substance widely used around the world because it reduces the volumes of fertiliser that require transportation. A fudging mental move which will reduce farmer choice, bring in yet more needless regulation and hamper industry competitiveness yet again. I don't know why you guys don't fudge the NFU, RT, AIC and AHDB off. There is no more room on the gravy train for these people.

Good point there too!!

In an age of reducing transport emissions, forcing the use of a less dense product does seem rather mad.
 

David.

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
J11 M40
I don't need any schooling in how the fert manufacturers have lobbied Govt for a ban on urea, using old ADAS trials results which were designed to prove that if you surface apply urea in a greenhouse at 35 deg, with forced ventilation, then some of it will evaporate to the atmosphere.
Thanks.
 
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DrWazzock

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Everyday there’s more of this high moral tone from the powers that be. It will achieve nothing when you consider the amounts used globally but hey ho, it goes down well in middle class urban voting areas. All it will do is result in our further impoverishment as a country as a result of higher costs to producers and consumers.
I despair.
As it is we are heading towards a fertiliser shortage crisis. You couldn’t make this up timing wise. Bonkers.
 

Farmer Roy

Member
Arable Farmer

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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