Splitting a 90 acre field into 45 x 2 acre fields

4course

Member
Location
north yorks
I can see there would be more money in it but if it was me I’d just sell it and let them get on with it can’t think of much worse than 45 plus tenants squabbling over who’s plants grown over who’s fence etc
possibly much better than trying to sell basic commodities to 2 or 3 buyers for a profit when their business model is buy the cheapest
 

HolzKopf

Member
Location
Kent&Snuffit
@Nearly has called it it will look like a shanty town
Agree, and you could keep one plot and set up a shop (sorry, I mean a 'store' :() that sells blue alkathene pipe, old pallets, cavaletti poles, IBCs, ragwort plug plants in plastic pots, thistles, and old bits and pieces of second-hand electric fence. Think of the carbon that would be saved by the inhabitants not having to truck it in......:whistle:

HK
 

Mur Huwcun

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North West Wales
Agree, and you could keep one plot and set up a shop (sorry, I mean a 'store' :() that sells blue alkathene pipe, old pallets, cavaletti poles, IBCs, ragwort plug plants in plastic pots, thistles, and old bits and pieces of second-hand electric fence. Think of the carbon that would be saved by the inhabitants not having to truck it in......:whistle:

HK

And the £50 a plot to power harrow it each spring….
 

4course

Member
Location
north yorks
Agree, and you could keep one plot and set up a shop (sorry, I mean a 'store' :() that sells blue alkathene pipe, old pallets, cavaletti poles, IBCs, ragwort plug plants in plastic pots, thistles, and old bits and pieces of second-hand electric fence. Think of the carbon that would be saved by the inhabitants not having to truck it in......:whistle:

HK
i realise the above post is taking the mick or whatever but there is many a true word spoken in jest. we as land holders wether tenants or owners should see that there are earning possibilites to be had other than basic commodity production
 

HolzKopf

Member
Location
Kent&Snuffit
i realise the above post is taking the mick or whatever but there is many a true word spoken in jest. we as land holders wether tenants or owners should see that there are earning possibilites to be had other than basic commodity production
I agree, we should all look at how to earn a realistic return on our investments but I have yet to see land that's closeby to a town that's split into paddocks come to anything other than a mess.

The 'Good Life' that the OP mentions is generally a temporary reaction to some work/life dissatisfaction or other, like a lockdown dog, enforced family 'country walks' and now camper van travels. We've all seen what's happened over the last eighteen months and how the early 'rush to the country' is now waning
Changes to agricultural land are generally permanent and I do accept that we do need to have incredibly strong principles when there are many out there who have 'office-based' salaries who are able and willing to pay top dollar for land when its purpose and existence has little respect from the very Government departments that are now banging the drum on fast food, salt, sugar, sustainability and food miles.

I've seen a large field near here plus 20 acres of woodland sold off at auction by a daughter whose elderly parents that used to work it could obviously now do with the money. The land is divided up into say 15 plots, the auction particulars showed computer images of cars, houses and leisure pursuits. The reality has been a running battle between the purchasers and the local authority and there is much unpermitted structures and 'mess' to be frank, still being dealt with. There are internal fences of all shapes and sizes from neat sheep netting to post and rail to flimsy B&Q panels. There's an inflatable pool, garden chairs, garden flowers and leylandii hedges. The verges of the lane that runs parallel were a total muddy mess, now baked hard and internal strife over 'access' has resulted in owners erecting stand-alone internal field gates and keep-out, keep-off and 'trespassers will-be' signage. A couple of them have battery CCTV cameras on poles and trees.

I don't know what the answer is in a free country that has bred a couple of generations of folk that feel 'entitled' - but what I do know is when you look up 'agriculture' in the dictionary 'food' is inextricably linked to the definition. And I agree that the need to look at other income streams is necessary for our survival. But we have binned much of our industrial heritage and do need to be careful about our squandering of land. The OP's plan is just a pimple so he can't carry the can for the disease of Government and the many that disrespect farming but it's yet another symptom of it, that's for sure

HK
 

D14

Member
Just pondering
I have a 90 acre field on the Urban Fringe
( if planning isn’t favourable for more lucrative uses)
What would stop me splitting into 45 x 2 acre fields and selling each one individually

there seems loads of new people on here wanting to buy an acre or two for the Good Life.
say £40k per 2 acre plot
Sell/transfer all on the same day to avoid being stuck with a few
??

Thats cheap. If I was you I would advertise 10 acres at one end of it in 1 acre plots at £40,000 each and then do a deal if somebody wants 2 acres. Once you've sold them do another 10 acres and you will find people might just start coming to you directly.
A paddock locally has just sold for £80,000 with no potential for building on it due to its location. It is only 1.2 acres in size and there is no mains elec or water to it and it lies very wet in the winter months. It seems covid has made everybody want their bit of the countryside away from the cities and towns. Any houses in rural locations are selling for over the asking prices at the minute. My mums family have just sold a 10 acre small holding with a bungalow in desperate need for renovation for £1.3 million. A realistic valuation pre covid was £850,000. It went on the market and they had had 20 offers within 48 hours. Again no planning potential as my mims family have been down that route with local planners to see if there was any future possibility. Theres even a 50% uplift clause in the sale for 99 years just in case planners change. I've a house in the local village that has gone up by £100,000 in the last 18 months. People are just going crazy for rural living irrelevant of the costs involved.
 

NI agri-food stakeholder groups discuss climate change bill with committee

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The Livestock and Meat Commission (LMC) recently submitted oral evidence to members of the Stormont Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (AERA) committee on the content and potential impact of the Northern Ireland Climate Change Bill (No.2).

This draft legislation was recently introduced to the Northern Ireland Assembly by the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) in conjunction with agriculture minister, Edwin Poots.

“We were accompanied by representatives from a wide range of food industry bodies, including the Northern Ireland Meat Exporters’ Association,the Ulster Farmers’ Union [UFU], Northern...
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