Spraying - low pressure

MattR

Member
Spraying cereals, currently on red (04) flat fans. Wanting to reduce water volume to around 145-150, at 11k that would mean 2 bar or just over. Should that be ok or is it too low for some things - ie get a set of blue nozzles instead?
 
Won’t get a very good spray pattern with 04s at 2bar as it will be a course spray, also if using any powder/granular based chemicals more chance of blocked nozzles at low pressures if not perfectly mixed
 

fudge

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire.
Spraying cereals, currently on red (04) flat fans. Wanting to reduce water volume to around 145-150, at 11k that would mean 2 bar or just over. Should that be ok or is it too low for some things - ie get a set of blue nozzles instead?
Why not increase your forward speed to 12k? It’s crazy buying a whole set of nozzles for such a minor change. TBH I would be astounded if you didn’t do a decent job at 2 bar 150lt/ha at T1.
 

MattR

Member
I'd go down a size to blues or what ever suits your rate and speed and will be working at about 3 bar.

(y) think I'll do that, thanks for the replies.

Why not increase your forward speed to 12k? It’s crazy buying a whole set of nozzles for such a minor change. TBH I would be astounded if you didn’t do a decent job at 2 bar 150lt/ha at T1.

Yeah certainly could do, although I often find 11k plenty fast enough on a few of our steep/awkward bits. At what speed does efficacy start dropping off - don't they say about vortices behind the boom at higher speeds? (I know we're only talking +1k so guess it doesn't make much odds?)

On a similar subject, as I said I do everything with flat fans at present. Don't have a big area to spray so I can afford to be fairly picky with conditions (though in a reasonably windy area) - but wondering whether it would be worth having a set of air induction nozzles to switch over to just in case. How much more wind will they cope with?
 

Chae1

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
(y) think I'll do that, thanks for the replies.



Yeah certainly could do, although I often find 11k plenty fast enough on a few of our steep/awkward bits. At what speed does efficacy start dropping off - don't they say about vortices behind the boom at higher speeds? (I know we're only talking +1k so guess it doesn't make much odds?)

On a similar subject, as I said I do everything with flat fans at present. Don't have a big area to spray so I can afford to be fairly picky with conditions (though in a reasonably windy area) - but wondering whether it would be worth having a set of air induction nozzles to switch over to just in case. How much more wind will they cope with?
I use both and find bubble jets very effective at reducing drift. Would use bubble jets 90% of the time. If your nozzle holders can take several nozzles it doesn't take long to swap over.
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
I was on flat fans but several years ago tried a set of guardian airs with the intention of using them for fungicides and when conditions were iffy and use FF most of the time but it soon got so I was using the GA all the time and they have been my one and only nozzle for a long time now.

A few weeks back I caught a wing tip and broke a GA(they are quite venerable) and I didn't have a spare so put a same colour FF on instead and the difference in drift was outstanding.
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
GA are the best IMO if just want one nozzle. I have 04 for pre em etc and 03 for everything else……try to run around 3 bar
Agree, 3bar seems to be there sweet spot, I'll alter my water rate a bit if I want to go at a different speed to keep the pressure about right. I will go up to 4bar and down to 2.3ish. they seem to be streaky at 2 and below but efficiency still seems good when running at that around headland for lerap 3 star.
 

cricketandcrops

Member
BASIS
Location
Lincolnshire
Red 04 at 2 bar applying 180 lt/ha at 9 kph
 

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Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
trouble is blues ..03's will block easier if theres reason
despite being 'advised' many times over the yrs that 3 bar is what should be used i like 2.5 or even a bit less, i must admit, less drift on flat fans as well but it s not proper coarse either
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
Most of the LERAP 3* drift reducing nozzles only have that rating at 2 bar. I wouldn't want to go much lower than that & personally, I prefer to run a smaller nozzle at 3 bar most of the time so at least I have the option to slow down on headlands if it's a bit rough or breezy.

Nozzle choice depends on what you are trying to hit and how your product works. Small target = higher volume and/or a finer spray. Large target = you can get away with a more coarse spray that gives you the widest window of opportunity to work. Contact only product = fine spray. Systemic/translocated product = ok to be more coarse.

A flat fan is the best for most jobs but is the most drift prone. I use a air indiction nozzle for most work that puts out a finer spray quality than the really coarse "contractor nozzles" designed for getting through a big workload when the conditions aren't ideal. Bubblejets and Guardian Airs are at the finer end of the scale.

Nozzle guide chart
 

Chae1

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
Most of the LERAP 3* drift reducing nozzles only have that rating at 2 bar. I wouldn't want to go much lower than that & personally, I prefer to run a smaller nozzle at 3 bar most of the time so at least I have the option to slow down on headlands if it's a bit rough or breezy.

Nozzle choice depends on what you are trying to hit and how your product works. Small target = higher volume and/or a finer spray. Large target = you can get away with a more coarse spray that gives you the widest window of opportunity to work. Contact only product = fine spray. Systemic/translocated product = ok to be more coarse.

A flat fan is the best for most jobs but is the most drift prone. I use a air indiction nozzle for most work that puts out a finer spray quality than the really coarse "contractor nozzles" designed for getting through a big workload when the conditions aren't ideal. Bubblejets and Guardian Airs are at the finer end of the scale.

Nozzle guide chart
What sprayer do you have at new place?
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
What sprayer do you have at new place?

A Bateman RB35 and a JD 740i trailed. Both 24m and a few years old each. The Bateman has single nozzle holders but the JD has 4 nozzle ends. Both currently running 035 Guardian Airs at 140 litres/ha for most jobs at this time of year. 3D Defy angled nozzles in the autumn & early spring. I manipulate water volumes if I need a finer spray. Lots of spread out blocks of cropping on 12 units means little gain from lowering water volumes to 100 l/ha as each block is 1 or 2 loads anyway.
 

Top cereal and oilseed growers honoured at the Yield Enhancement Network Awards 2021

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Despite an average growing year for most crops, many growers managed to go above and beyond their predicted max yields, with Lincolnshire grower Tim Lamyman taking the top spots for his wheat yields and his world record breaking winter barley yield.

The highest cereal and oilseed yields achieved at harvest 2021 were announced at this year’s Yield Enhancement Network (YEN) Awards on Wednesday 24th November at the Croptec Show. With award presentations by Tom Bradshaw, Vice President of NFU, 24 farms took home the evening’s top awards for highest yield and highest potential yield achieved for wheat, winter and spring barley, oats, and oilseed. The 2021 winners came from all corners of the UK, as well as from as far afield as Finland and New Zealand.

Familiar names from 2020 made the...
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