Spring barley varieties tillering rate

DanniAgro

Member
Does anyone have experience of the different tillering rates of the main varieties on the market? Is there any real difference? I'm thinking of varieties like Planet, Diablo and Cosmopolitan.
Any help gratefully received in order to fill in my ignorance, having not grown it since 2013!
 

DanniAgro

Member
The only thing I've learnt so far is that Planet has a higher recommended seed rate than most others, so I'll not be growing any, as this suggests a lower tillering rate than average.
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Midlands
I'd look at your market for the grain - a few extra premiums will outweigh a bit of extra seed many times over. Planet has a big market. For smaller markets, a few extra tonnes will have a much bigger impact on premiums, especially if you don't hit the required N spec.

I should add that Planet is an awful variety with no market, since it's a large % of my area, along with Laureate! :p
 

DanniAgro

Member
The thing that I was concerned about was cobbly seedbeds in the rougher parts of my fields - I know that from my experience with winter wheat, where a good tillering variety like Robigus after maize would tiller freely if areas of the field had a lower emergence. This has occurred many times over the years, and I assume the the same applies to spring barley.
The crop is being grown only for feed, as the chance of it making malting grade is low, and anyway the premium will probably be poor this year because most barns will be full of it this year.
Sorry to hear that you've got a lot of a variety that doesn't promise much, as purely by chance I've chosen Diablo and Cosmopolitan - will let you know if they're rubbish as well in September!
 
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T Hectares

Member
Location
Berkshire
I'd look at your market for the grain - a few extra premiums will outweigh a bit of extra seed many times over. Planet has a big market. For smaller markets, a few extra tonnes will have a much bigger impact on premiums, especially if you don't hit the required N spec.

I should add that Planet is an awful variety with no market, since it's a large % of my area, along with Laureate! :p
I'd also add that Spring Barley in general is an awful crop, best not grow any at all imo ;)
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
I would stick with planet then you will have seed to save to grow for malting next year. It’s a good proven variety. I have heard Diablo is good too but hasn’t got malting approval yet?
 

Seed&Grain

Member
Diablo has distilling approval and the breeder is hopeful that it will get brewing approval in May. Planet and Laureate seed is getting short in supply and the price reflects this. Diablo and Cosmopolitan yield better, there is more seed available and the price is approx. £30.00 a tonne cheaper. As has been said above Planet is the widest grown and unless you are on very light land or can generally get low Ns the variety that is least risky to grow for Malting. Laureate is a dual purpose variety, which offers growers higher premiums for sub 1.65N but with the protection of fall backs to 1.85n.
 

DanniAgro

Member
What do you all think about the prospects for malting premium, given that it will be filling half the barns in the country by September? I wouldn't give high chances for reasonable premiums.
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
What do you all think about the prospects for malting premium, given that it will be filling half the barns in the country by September? I wouldn't give high chances for reasonable premiums.
I'd say premiums will be very poor because theres a lot TO go in but non of it has gone in yet and it's not looking like it will for a few weeks yet so theres the possibility the premium could be huge for anyone who can get some in if the weather stays as it is.

Personally I've said sod the malsters I'll be chucking a bit extra N on mine and hope for a bit extra yield of feed grain.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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