Supplies, fertiliser, feed, etc,

I wonder what this will do for supplies, l defo think in a week or 10 days you won't be allowed to move in this country, l wonder if you will be allowed to bury dead sheep etc and what about vets etc. I was told l may not get my fertiliser that's to come next month till mid May. Maybe l will just cut what grows and buy some hay next spring, maybe cheaper anyways.
 
I’ve spoken to my main lime supply quarry this morning. They have put in place a one man/one machine policy. Only the weighbridge operator is allowed on his office so, essentially, they are self isolating before any bother.

Assuming I can get lorries with drivers I’m hoping to get some lime spread. If it ever dries up that is. Just heading into my 20th week having done nothing.
 

Will 1594

Member
Arable Farmer
I’ve spoken to my main lime supply quarry this morning. They have put in place a one man/one machine policy. Only the weighbridge operator is allowed on his office so, essentially, they are self isolating before any bother.

Assuming I can get lorries with drivers I’m hoping to get some lime spread. If it ever dries up that is. Just heading into my 20th week having done nothing.
Pete when you say you done no spreading , I take it you have paid work elsewhere to cover you
 
No, not really, it’s my only reliable income.
That said, in a normal year it keeps me busy 9 months of the year. The rest is soon spent on maintenance, repairs, various FACTS and NROSO courses and of course the sheep do take up a bit of time, although they are more a hobby than a money spinner. I do have a few days to myself too.

I could have been busy refurbishing a trailer and even a tractor but after last autumns low tonnage due to wet and windy weather I’ve put all money spending plans on hold.

My advantage is that my costs are low. I don’t buy new kit and seldom borrow money to buy what I have. My finance payments don’t worry me too much but it won’t be long until they will. I don’t have 10,000 tonnes of lime in my yard looking for a home and I don’t buy haulage until the customer asks for something, so my only real costs are kit and my wages when wheels aren’t turning.

My main worry was my own stupid fault. My order book is bursting at the seams. Work outstanding from last year and new orders make it look like a very promising season, so when my car completely imploded at Christmas I bought a pickup thinking we’ll be busy soon. Bad decision. I should have just spent £2000 on my old car. Might have to finance it soon, whereas I had just bought it outright.

We are ok for the moment. 2018 was a superb year for me and, true to form, I saved rather than spent it all. We’re chipping away at that now. An average spring will see us ok, but it’s slipping away unless I get working soon. We have had some late but good spring seasons in the past.

The next year is worrying me. Are you farmers going to have any money?
 

Shutesy

Moderator
Arable Farmer
I wonder what this will do for supplies, l defo think in a week or 10 days you won't be allowed to move in this country, l wonder if you will be allowed to bury dead sheep etc and what about vets etc. I was told l may not get my fertiliser that's to come next month till mid May. Maybe l will just cut what grows and buy some hay next spring, maybe cheaper anyways.
I did wonder about what would happen if the logistics of supplies of things we need on the farm get disrupted, so I have now got enough fert, seed, fuel to get us to harvest and chemical on the farm for at least the next 2 months.
 
I have stocked up on feed for our few pigs and chickens, but was wondering whether to get hold of a couple of dumpy bags of grain to put away and use as the basis for their feed if things were unavailable for a week or two. I still have the old mill and tanks from our dairy days, but wondered whether Mole Valley or someone would do just a few big bags either delivered or to collect? Anyone do that? :)
 
Location
Devon
I have stocked up on feed for our few pigs and chickens, but was wondering whether to get hold of a couple of dumpy bags of grain to put away and use as the basis for their feed if things were unavailable for a week or two. I still have the old mill and tanks from our dairy days, but wondered whether Mole Valley or someone would do just a few big bags either delivered or to collect? Anyone do that? :)

MVF will do tote bags, think its a 2 ton min delivery thou.
 
Location
Devon
I wonder what this will do for supplies, l defo think in a week or 10 days you won't be allowed to move in this country, l wonder if you will be allowed to bury dead sheep etc and what about vets etc. I was told l may not get my fertiliser that's to come next month till mid May. Maybe l will just cut what grows and buy some hay next spring, maybe cheaper anyways.

Farming/vets/ suppliers of feeds are seen as essential so will be allowed to carry on.

From talking to a lot of over 70's earlier I don't think any lockdown for more than a couple of weeks in the UK would work anyway, all of them said they are not staying home for at least 4 months, they will carry on like normal other than be sensible and stay away from crowded places like supermarkets etc unless they get ill.
 

Chris F

Staff Member
Media
Location
Hammerwich
Fert all delivered last month
seed in the shed or can be Collected from dressing plant 1 mile away
chemical canbe collected if need be

There are certainly no problems with ag chem orders being delivered at the moment. Most drivers aren't that busy. Some of the Farm Marketplace orders have even been delivered same day, when normally they are at least next day.
 

Yorkshire lad

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
YO42
Neighbour came today asking to top his up . Apparently fuel deliveries now are taking at least week from the order being taken A combination of people paniking and one of the refineries at Immingham having a break down
 

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham from CPM Magazine

JCB has launched new Fastrac 4000 and 8000 Series tractors with an all-new electronics infrastructure which is claimed to deliver higher levels of performance. According to JCB, the new Fastrac iCon operator environment has three key features: iConfigure – creating a bespoke control experience for every operator iConnect – integrating advanced precision agriculture technology iControl – redefining operation through new driveline software The 175hp to 348hp (133kW to 260kW) Fastracs feature the new iCon armrest console and touch-screen display to provide flexibility in operator allocation and operator information, as well as a new transmission control strategy to enhance operator comfort and powertrain efficiency, says the manufacturer...
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