Swedes - whats this rot?

Stuart J

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
What's this rot and what's caused it??
 

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neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
What's this rot and what's caused it??

Did it have a lot of N applied? I understand they can split if they grow too fast, from too much N, but always seem to get a few anyway.

The split ones don't normally rot though. Any boron applied, or could it be brown rot due to Boron deficiency, combined with splitting mentioned above? Or just a fungal infection that's been let in through a split? :scratchhead:
 

Stuart J

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
600kg/ha of 10-20-10+B applied pre sowing.

I didnt think that would be too much, but maybe it is?

It has been a growthy year in starts and stops which may have led to splitting.
An optimistic 40% affected.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
600kg/ha of 10-20-10+B applied pre sowing.

I didnt think that would be too much, but maybe it is?

It has been a growthy year in starts and stops which may have led to splitting.
An optimistic 40% affected.

I wouldn't have thought that would be too much N either, unless there was a lot of muck under it too.

A boron spray would be relatively cheap I guess, but it shouldn't need any on top of the fert, and damage already done (if it is that, I'm not convinced).

Bugger! :(
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
Slag will grow roots like nothing else - that I have proven, another good one is Limex , Puffin use tons of it
Wouldn’t mention them around here with the cauli department...
Having used limex when working near Newark and the return loads for beet I took in was limex I know the product well.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Wouldn’t mention them around here with the cauli department...
Having used limex when working near Newark and the return loads for beet I took in was limex I know the product well.

My understanding was that beet growers would take Limex back with their empty trailers as it cost bugger all, which was about what it was worth.
On that basis, I’m not sure how the figures could stack up if it has to be hauled over West from ever more distant beet factories.
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
My understanding was that beet growers would take Limex back with their empty trailers as it cost bugger all, which was about what it was worth.
On that basis, I’m not sure how the figures could stack up if it has to be hauled over West from ever more distant beet factories.
Exactly, which is how I’ve done so much with it when I wasn’t far from Newark and was delivering in.
The efficiencies of some arnt always to be admired. Look at the AD boys hauling maize 100+mile, sometimes you need to waste the money so that you can tighten down on costs when push comes to shove. Topping and ploughing in a big acreage of cauli’s on expensive rents When you havnt even picked them can’t stack up....
 
Location
Ceredigion
Exactly, which is how I’ve done so much with it when I wasn’t far from Newark and was delivering in.
The efficiencies of some arnt always to be admired. Look at the AD boys hauling maize 100+mile, sometimes you need to waste the money so that you can tighten down on costs when push comes to shove. Topping and ploughing in a big acreage of cauli’s on expensive rents When you havnt even picked them can’t stack up....
Was that the drier stuff
 
I would say the top one is a split that has got rotten and not 'healed up'. Used to see the odd split, never took much notice, often they were 'dry' and sound, they didn't seem to hurt.

The rot on the crown under the stems is usually the classic symptom of nutrient deficiency, I used to spray my beet once or twice a year when passing through the crop for just this reason. It's a big plant with a (hopefully) big root and I found foliar sprays were not that expensive considering the other costs involved. Used to throw a fair bit of foliar feed in where I could.
 
Exactly, which is how I’ve done so much with it when I wasn’t far from Newark and was delivering in.
The efficiencies of some arnt always to be admired. Look at the AD boys hauling maize 100+mile, sometimes you need to waste the money so that you can tighten down on costs when push comes to shove. Topping and ploughing in a big acreage of cauli’s on expensive rents When you havnt even picked them can’t stack up....

Always will be waste with caulie.

Hard to predict what other growers will do
Hard to predict what buyers will buy
When will the caulie mature? can't be stored more than a few days in a fridge.
Easily changes price from 20p to £1.50 per head in a few days, sometimes first loss the best loss.

Edit Just had two wholesalers ring for caulie, there is none anywhere at the moment.
Too much gotready three weeks ago.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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