TB Disease Investigation Report Visit

Discussion in 'Livestock & Forage' started by orbost, May 8, 2019.

  1. orbost

    orbost Member

    Location:
    south
    I had a some IR at a 2nd TB test and 3 cows had to be sent off , and now a vet APHA is coming out to give me advise on TB ie field maps , grouping cows farm biosecurity .

    Whats all that about just a waste of time or helpful .
     
  2. Charolais cattle

    Location:
    Ireland
    Waste of time...
     
    steveR, Tarw Coch, Moo cow and 5 others like this.
  3. 500john

    500john Member

    Location:
    Herefordshire
    Yep, waste of time.
     
  4. topground

    topground Member

    Location:
    North Somerset.
    Ask the vet what APHA and Public Health England are going to do about the likely source of the infection in your cattle, the reservoir of infection in wildlife before it infects companion animals and the human population.
    When they trot out the biosecurity line ask them how you are expected to prevent an incontinent badger leaking Tb bacilli all over your grazing land.
    No doubt others will be along shortly with other helpful suggestions!
     
  5. davidroberts30

    Location:
    pembrokeshire
    Good post(y)
     
    multi power likes this.
  6. davidroberts30

    Location:
    pembrokeshire
    Oh and apha is waste of time
     
  7. exmoor dave

    exmoor dave Member

    Location:
    exmoor, uk
    Our experience is that they will put a map on the table and ask you to mark badger setts..... even though apparently its not badgers that done it (according to APHA)
     
    JCMaloney, VMD100, Yale and 3 others like this.
  8. AGN76

    AGN76 Member

    Location:
    north Wales
    Ask them when they will be testing the setts.
     
  9. kill

    kill Member

    Location:
    South West
    I just hope they send you someone that can actually speak "ENGLISH" as the last one that came here was virtually impossible to understand as had very poor pigeon English and general understanding of my situation etc. But I almost think that was done on purpose as the English ones don't want the difficult questions being asked.
    Get yourself a visit from TBAS as I find them excellent with advice and help on getting movement licenses and general help and advice and just so approachable. All these services need using or will be lost. I went to a TBAS meeting at my local town on Tuesday and I was ashamed how poorly attended it was:(
     
  10. Werzle

    Werzle Member

    Location:
    Midlands
    Tb's a f##ker but at the end of the day the person visiting you is just doing there job. The chap that came to me was expecting a bollocking but i couldnt be bothered , just tell him where you think its coming from and play the game. Getting yourself churned/ revved up doesnt alter your situation . The best advice i would offer any farmer is to control your own wildlife
     
  11. egbert

    egbert Member

    Sorry to hear there's another new member in the club no-one wants to be in.

    I've had 'off farm' dealings with plenty of apha staff, and there are some decent intelligent folk therein,
    although the high turnover speaks volumes in itself.

    For your own sake, don't give them a hard time.
    Their hands are tied, and they're mostly going through the motions.
    (remember, the field vets are that, and didn't go through college -here or abroad- to tinker away at something which is costing the lives of so many cattle)

    They won't have much useful advice that you can't work out for yourself, but listen anyway.
     
    ollie989898, Tarw Coch, JP1 and 2 others like this.
  12. matthew

    matthew Member

    We have a big problem here, in that the top end of TeaBag (or whatever they call themselves this year) are lecturing farmers to 'own the situation'.
    Just how a cattle farmer can do that when as @topground has pointed out, highly infected, over protected and incontinent wildlife are polluting your grassland, is not explained. Territorial and hungry badgers are very determined.

    The other angle that T-Bag's members are (still) promotoing is badger vaccination - that despite the accumulated evidence of trials over the last 9 years that indicate not an iota of benefit is seen by cattle restrictions in areas where it has been widespread. See links in this posting:

    https://bovinetb.blogspot.com/2019/03/new-year-new-lies.html

    I'm afraid that I have no time at all for this merry go round of misery, foisted on to us, along with a shower of blame from many different agencies, sources and assorted hangers on. They are not a solution. They are a very big problem.

    The only thing found to get herds clear of TB long term is to get rid of the badgers up spilling infection. That was made crystal clear in our PQ's. The alternative is to get rid of your cattle. So, keep focussed and read some history of TB eradication. If we don't understand that background history, we are condemned to repeating it.

    https://bovinetb.blogspot.com/2018/02/zoonotic-tuberculosis-and-straw-men.html
     
    Tarw Coch, roscoe erf, Angus and 7 others like this.
  13. Could the OP gather relevant evidence then apply for a licence to trap badgers and have them tested for TB. That could actually push the issue.....
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
    Treg likes this.
  14. AGN76

    AGN76 Member

    Location:
    north Wales
    I've just reported a 3rd roadkill badger of the year as per the WAG request. Does anyone else in Wales do this? There seems to be a great apathy around these parts that p1sses me off, typical divided we stand, United we fall attitude. I bet I'm the only one that reports them. I know the vets collect them and I assume test them for tb, and then produce some data? @matthew , different country I know, but any idea?
     
    Treg and holwellcourtfarm like this.
  15. matthew

    matthew Member

    People have done that in the past with a very good, validated PCR test for badger latrines. Problem there is that the chief scientist who developed the test does NOT want it used to cull badgers.
    Another one ‘following the money’.

    Three farmers I know who paid to do this non invasive test, found about one third of their setts to be infected.
     
  16. matthew

    matthew Member

    Roadkill is an indication of the level of infection in the badger population.
    When Cheshire examined roadkill they found about 3 % positive.
    A deeper collection including farmland etc. found 20%.

    https://phys.org/news/2018-12-survey-reveals-bovine-tb-roadkill.html

    My own feeling is don’t look, won’t find. But we want more research cash to confirm.
     
  17. AGN76

    AGN76 Member

    Location:
    north Wales
    Then what?
     
  18. MiJ

    MiJ Member

    Location:
    w.mids
    and why OUR cash was wasted on a certain Prof’s research at Warwick Uni. PCR. Proven to be more than useful and use of - denied.
     
    Angus, matthew, wrenbird and 2 others like this.
  19. matthew

    matthew Member

    Nothing.
    APHA said it was an unreliable test (it wasn't)
    Warwick Uni don't agree with culling infectious golden geese (badgers)
     
  20. Surely they could then apply for a licence to kill the badgers in those setts as they meet the criteria for the economic impact under the licence. Push the issue public.
     
    som farmer, Dry Rot and Treg like this.

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