TED20 Engine Refurb.

Discussion in 'Classic Machinery' started by DrWazzock, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    If my memory is correct, they are wet liners sealed at the bottom with paper gaskets, and not a tight fit at all. I am sure that it was standard practice to put a couple of bolts and washers to hold the liners down before you turned the engine with the head off, otherwise they would pop up with the pistons and tear the bottom gaskets. That being the case,I dont think there is any real danger of the block cracking if they are removed, and in fact it would be a good idea to pull them out, god knows what those paper gaskets are like now!
     
  2. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    I'd put it back together and put a flush in, what is it going to be doing?
    You have to keep things in proportion, not careful it will be a full rebuild.
    Can't get a new oil pump, no?
     
  3. John 1594

    John 1594 Member

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    As i said before, if it hold water, leave well alone

    Seen more than one engine block ruined by dragging liners out and half the liner seats came with them

    they might be a slip fit when new, but 60 years worth of sediment and rust may not let them go so easily
     
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  4. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Knocked the liners out easily with a block of wood and a rubber mallet. Severely corroded. Liner seats look OK though it was a bit of work scraping the remnants of the seals off of them and bits of flaky rust cast that had encroached round the edge of the seats. Looks like there should be enough clean uncorroded cast to reseal against the new liner seals. Released about a shovelful of rust flakes. Scraped and hosed the inside of the block out. Looks much better.

    The crack along the side of the block extends from the drain hole along two cylinders. Somebody had bodged it with putty but missed most of the crack and there is evidence it's been leaking slightly so have ground it off and will give it a dose of JB weld high heat putty. Should hold water.
     
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  5. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    Yet another repair technique, I wasn't aware of until recently
     
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  6. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    It's a complete rebuild now.
     
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  7. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    If you have all this rust to contend with, I would recommend a Bilt Hamber de-ox c bath. It really is magic stuff, and biodegradable when finished with.Overnight soak should bring those liners up like new. saved hours of cleaning on the model N I did for my neighbour, and that had been outside for 20 years!
     
  8. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    That's useful to know, but I reckon I'll fit new liners as I can feel a bit of a step in them.

    Manual recommends heating the Pistons in boiling oil to fit the gudgeon pins. Wondering if they'll just press in, when I get to that stage, or if I need to borrow the deep fat frier.
     
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  9. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    Modern version of chain studding .Metaloc came out to Hong Kong and used a similar method to put the side of a generator crankcase back in, after it had thrown a rod.Broken bit weighed around 3/4 of a ton!
     
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  10. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    Couple of kettles of water will do, or a hair dryer. Dont press them in cold, they could be slack when the engine warms up.
     
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  11. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Wondering about some Loctite 510 to help the cylinder seals at the bottom end. Or will it cause more problems than it solves by setting and not letting the cylinders bed down properly or causing the seals to squeeze out. No, maybe best leave the gaskets dry. The surfaces in the block aren't too bad, except round the periphery where the old gaskets didn't cover the cast iron and a bit of flaking intruded in.
     
  12. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    Hylomar should be fine, but, dont forget to clamp the liners down as soon as they are fitted.
     
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  13. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Thanks.

    Hylomar blue, or Hylomar Hylotyte Red?

    I like the idea of the blue being non setting. The red is supposed to stand a higher temperature but don't know if it's non setting.
     
  14. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Reading a bit further it looks like blue will be quite satisfactory.
     
  15. Ley253

    Ley253 Member

    Location:
    Bath
    Yes, blue.
     
  16. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    A few dilemmas.

    Governor shaft that runs through timing case feels stiff if you move it slightly off centre and try to rotate it. What sort of bearings does it run in through case? Are they a standard size? Can't see any available via sparex etc.

    One of the cylinder head nut washers appears to be nylon. Can't remember if it came from the nut that has the steel tab under it half way along head and if it performs some sort of sealing function?

    Oil filter canister has a spring loaded plate in the bottom held against a spring with a round circlip. Can't get my hand down the canister to remove the clip to investigate whether felt washer is still intact between spring and plate. Tried releasing the clip with a screw driver but it feels tight on as if it's been welded somehow. Is it worth trying any more to see if felt washer has gone or best leave it alone as leakage won't be a lot. Top end felt washer had disintegrated so replaced it with an o ring.
     
  17. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Somebody had wound the governor shaft retaining bolt through the LH bearing. Presumably the bearing had been knocked or slipped across a bit. The end had been broken off the retaining bolt as well.
    brg1.jpg brg2.jpg

    Torrington BH78X bearings.
     
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  18. DrWazzock

    DrWazzock Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    The old manual recommends soaking the felt seals in shellac before pushing them into the groove each side the bearing cap at flywheel end.

    Is shellac still available or is there a modern alternative?

    Thanks.
     
  19. Db880

    Db880 Member

    Location:
    Norfolk
    Please excuse my ignorance, what is shellac?
     
  20. MrNoo

    MrNoo Member

    Location:
    Cirencester
    I thought it was a type of resin but Ladies now have "shellac nails"
    Who knows, I am surprised they haven't made some rubber seals for it by now.
    But I guess it must do the job as my 1948 TEA must still be using the old felt seals as not had it apart and it's never been apart bar the head coming off for a check over.
     

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